Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 113 of 113
  1. #1
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
    Reputation: NEPMTBA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    8,466

    Idea! Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...

    Rock chokes, shoots, plates, gaps, Rock gardens, or Rock features here!

    Here's one...

    ... we designed and called it "The Angle Straight Angle, a very unique rock assembly we found on the property. It took two of us 4 hours to pull and tug these into place using a quad wedged against a tree with a winch and strap, then using pry bars to move to the locations you see in the pic!

    There are 3 lines, the left has a squeezer tree in the entrance, but is more beginner friendly, while the middle is the actual Angle Straight Angle and the right line is a gap climb that requires trial skills! Really happy when a section has multiple lines, something for everyone! Riding it backwards makes for 6 different lines!

    I will check back, hope to have a pic with a rider to give more perspective.

    Hope you enjoy!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-imag0013_900x900.jpg  

    Last edited by NEPMTBA; 11-20-2011 at 07:37 PM.

  2. #2
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    The Wave

    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  3. #3
    Big B's Trails
    Reputation: ImaFred's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,762
    Here's a couple of features that have yet to be introduced... Should be a good Christmas...shhh


    I dig dirt!

  4. #4
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
    Reputation: NEPMTBA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    8,466

    Good job!

    slocaus:

    How are the wooden runners attached to the trees? Are they bolted through, or nailed? I see a piece of steel just can't tell.

    It must have been mind boggling to get that patch of trees lined up to build that great feature!

  5. #5
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    Cross members lagged to the trees; we know we will have to redo them in a year or two as the trees grow. These are non-native Eucalyptus, which was the primary reason we were able to get approval to build in an Open Space Reserve; we will remove many Eucs, and it is hidden somewhat from view.







    We were fortunate to have two long term professional wood butchers, a carpenter and cabinet maker, plus the City guy who has built many bridges for City trails that we have done the dirt work. Here are just a couple of dozens in four different areas, that Dan has built.



    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  6. #6
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Here's one from today - Hennessey Hill DH trail Beerburrum, Qld Australia.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-p1030432-1.jpg  


  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    85
    Rocky Knob, Boone N.C.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-p6091261.jpg  

    Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-p6081251.jpg  


  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    24
    Here are some pics of log skinny's and bridges we built on my buddies property.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-log-skinny-4.jpg  

    Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-teets.jpg  

    Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-bridge-over-marsh.jpg  

    Post up your "Rock" gardens or features...-bridge-over-fence.jpg  


  9. #9
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,577
    We don't build artificial "features" on our trails. If the terrain is rocky, then there will be a rocky trail. If the terrain is more dirt then we'll have a fast, buff trail.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swingset's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    349
    Quote Originally Posted by zrm View Post
    We don't build artificial "features" on our trails. If the terrain is rocky, then there will be a rocky trail. If the terrain is more dirt then we'll have a fast, buff trail.
    Thanks for contributing.
    "Wait, this thing doesn't have a motor?" - Socrates

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    We have an abundance of rock, a dearth of dirt and pretty rough terrain so we have lots of rock features. There are plenty of instances where considerable rock work is needed to make a trail even passable. Building rock features is more labour-intensive than say wooden ones, but the advantage is that rock lasts forever. Here are a few pics of rock features on trails around St. John's, Newfoundland:


    Natural rock spine. I added the rocks in the foreground to make it possible to go up the middle of the spine. Note the cheater lines (grr) on the left:


    Rock bench leading into double rock step-up.


    Rock bridge in progress:


    Rock berms






    Rock garden? More like a rock farm! This was a natural outcrop of jagged and jumbled rocks. We added rocks to make it passable.


    More rock bridges and benches:









    The lack of dirt means we have to be very particular with how we build the rock work so that everything stays put. Sometimes it takes multiple attempts to get a feature exactly right in that regard.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    We have an abundance of rock, a dearth of dirt and pretty rough terrain so we have lots of rock features.
    Holy crap! My arms hurt just looking at that!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by BonkedAgain View Post
    Holy crap! My arms hurt just looking at that!
    Arms, back, knees, everything hurts after a day of that work.

    Worth it though.

  14. #14
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    We have an abundance of rock, a dearth of dirt and pretty rough terrain so we have lots of rock features. There are plenty of instances where considerable rock work is needed to make a trail even passable. Building rock features is more labour-intensive than say wooden ones, but the advantage is that rock lasts forever. Here are a few pics of rock features on trails around St. John's, Newfoundland:

    The lack of dirt means we have to be very particular with how we build the rock work so that everything stays put. Sometimes it takes multiple attempts to get a feature exactly right in that regard.
    That is incredibly well done! It takes serious vision and commitment to do that and make it look so natural. I am in awe! (We are the opposite, sand and chaparral, with very little rock and what there is is crumbly.)
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  15. #15
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,328
    Here's some LIMITED rock work on my local trails. They are in a sand pit so rocks are a rare commodity. These were some smallish rocks donated by a local landscaping company that became a few small rock gardens.

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5045715144/" title="SFA Recreational Trails by mtbikernate, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4131/5045715144_31cc60dd36.jpg" width="334" height="500" alt="SFA Recreational Trails"></a>

    And this big 'ol hunk of concrete was already in the woods for us to use.

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5045108325/" title="SFA Recreational Trails by mtbikernate, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4129/5045108325_24e75fd716.jpg" width="333" height="500" alt="SFA Recreational Trails"></a>

    We have a couple tiny exposures of native bedrock, but it's a VERY soft rock (a geology prof I had calls it "half-rock" - it's a glauconite from the Weches Formation) and so anywhere it gets exposed becomes very smooth and somewhat slippery in short order with bike tires on it.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    That is incredibly well done! It takes serious vision and commitment to do that and make it look so natural. I am in awe! (We are the opposite, sand and chaparral, with very little rock and what there is is crumbly.)
    Wow! Thanks for the kind words about our rock work! We still have a lot to learn but we're getting there. I'd love to get down your way to ride sometime for something completely different. One of my favourite manufacturers related to my other passion (music) is based in SLO (Ernie Ball/Musicman) as well.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BacDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    665
    Some great artistry in these trail building shots!

    Thanks for posting!

  18. #18
    ~*~*~*~*~
    Reputation: oldbroad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    590
    Just amazing L. Ron Hoover. Do you move all those rocks by hand, or do you have a rope & pulley system?
    The rocks in pic #7 look huge, and there are no tall enough trees for r&p!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rob_co2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    Arms, back, knees, everything hurts after a day of that work.

    Worth it though.
    My butt hurts from thinking about trying to ride it on a hardtail

    So is this more of a gravity-oriented trail, or do Newfoundlanders just do XC at a more technical level than most?

  20. #20
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    We have an abundance of rock, a dearth of dirt and pretty rough terrain so we have lots of rock features. There are plenty of instances where considerable rock work is needed to make a trail even passable.

    The lack of dirt means we have to be very particular with how we build the rock work so that everything stays put. Sometimes it takes multiple attempts to get a feature exactly right in that regard.
    Quote Originally Posted by rob_co2 View Post
    My butt hurts from thinking about trying to ride it on a hardtail

    So is this more of a gravity-oriented trail, or do Newfoundlanders just do XC at a more technical level than most?
    Seems clear to me! Almost no dirt, plenty of rock, rough terrain that can be unrideable, they make a way to ride with rock. Beautiful, passionate, dedicated work with a humongous helping of love for mother nature thrown in!
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by oldbroad View Post
    Just amazing L. Ron Hoover. Do you move all those rocks by hand, or do you have a rope & pulley system?
    The rocks in pic #7 look huge, and there are no tall enough trees for r&p!
    We move the rocks by hand with the help of steel drawbars. The larger rocks in pic #7 are pieces of a very weathered bedrock outcrop so we didn't have to move them. We added rocks to the naturally occurring ones to get a workable piece of trail. It rides surprisingly smoothly. Most of the rocks in any of those features were probably transported less than 20 feet. They're everywhere so it makes sense to use them in trail building.

    Quote Originally Posted by rob_co2 View Post
    My butt hurts from thinking about trying to ride it on a hardtail

    So is this more of a gravity-oriented trail, or do Newfoundlanders just do XC at a more technical level than most?
    People do ride these trails on HTs. Not me though, my old guy back and knees hurt too much for that. The pics are all from a system of "XC" trails. The terrain makes for very technical, generally low speed riding, there aren't many sections of smooth, fast hardpack around here. The terrain rewards FS for sure. The added traction afforded by rear suspension outweighs any pedaling efficiency issues.


    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    Seems clear to me! Almost no dirt, plenty of rock, rough terrain that can be unrideable, they make a way to ride with rock. Beautiful, passionate, dedicated work with a humongous helping of love for mother nature thrown in!
    Thanks again! Kind words indeed.

  22. #22
    The White Jeff W
    Reputation: jeffw-13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,674
    Here's a pic of a of a piece of a short trail I built through a rocky area. We have a serious lack of tech riding at the local trails so Ive had my eye on this area for awhile.

    No moss...

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    419

    O'Bannon Woods

    Lots of ravines at O'Bannon, but also lots of rocks.







    This one is waiting for next month's work session


  24. #24
    Delirious Tuck
    Reputation: thefriar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,442
    Indy what's that cart? Looks handy!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    553
    Fun stuff everyone. Here's a link to a video of a trail we, the Colorado MTB Assn. (COMBA.org), finished earlier this year. Raspberry Ridge and Blackjack trails are 3.5 miles of rockin' fun about an hour southwest of Denver. This video just gives you a taste of some of the work that we did. There are other videos on You Tube and Vimeo that show more. Hope you enjoy.

    Blackjack - YouTube

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    419

    Tree Dolly

    Quote Originally Posted by thefriar View Post
    Indy what's that cart? Looks handy!
    It's a Tree Dolly. We use it as a poor mans grip hoist. We often and source rocks up hill from the trail and you can move some big rocks with it when gravity is on you side.



    Most Landscapers have them. We borrowed one from a landscaper who mountain biked and then bought one.

    Here is one source.

    Search results for 'tree cart' (3 found) | Gempler's

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BacDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    665
    Quote Originally Posted by casey View Post
    Fun stuff everyone. Here's a link to a video of a trail we, the Colorado MTB Assn. (COMBA.org), finished earlier this year. Raspberry Ridge and Blackjack trails are 3.5 miles of rockin' fun about an hour southwest of Denver. This video just gives you a taste of some of the work that we did. There are other videos on You Tube and Vimeo that show more. Hope you enjoy.

    Blackjack - YouTube
    casey,

    That was awesome! some pretty sweet tech rock riding - great video!

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    25
    My latest trail feature build...


  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by casey View Post
    Fun stuff everyone. Here's a link to a video of a trail we, the Colorado MTB Assn. (COMBA.org), finished earlier this year. Raspberry Ridge and Blackjack trails are 3.5 miles of rockin' fun about an hour southwest of Denver. This video just gives you a taste of some of the work that we did. There are other videos on You Tube and Vimeo that show more. Hope you enjoy.

    Blackjack - YouTube
    Wow, awesome! That's my kind of trail.

  30. #30
    I need skills
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,067

    video from WI

    an XC trail. We've put a lot of effort to incorporate the rocks.
    Roche sample Video - Pinkbike.com

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BacDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    665
    Quote Originally Posted by cjohnson View Post
    an XC trail. We've put a lot of effort to incorporate the rocks.
    Roche sample Video - Pinkbike.com
    Cool vid and music! Gives me some great ideas for my trail.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44

    New Switchback underway at Cherokee Park in Louisville

    Construction started on a tight 9' switchback with dry stack back wall. Will update when we get this one done.





    Material Slide in action:




    Entrance is steep so we are putting in armor on the tread coming up:




  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Davis View Post
    Construction started on a tight 9' switchback with dry stack back wall. Will update when we get this one done.





    Material Slide in action:




    Entrance is steep so we are putting in armor on the tread coming up:




    Wow! Seriously nice rock work here. Looks awesome and it must be nice to have all those nice square-edged rocks.

  34. #34
    LMN
    LMN is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,251
    Wow. You just gave a reason to head to Newfoundland. Awesome.

    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    We have an abundance of rock, a dearth of dirt and pretty rough terrain so we have lots of rock features. There are plenty of instances where considerable rock work is needed to make a trail even passable. Building rock features is more labour-intensive than say wooden ones, but the advantage is that rock lasts forever. Here are a few pics of rock features on trails around St. John's, Newfoundland:
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,417
    Really nice looking rock work. I have been in Cherokee Park, but have never seen this. I will need to get out for an inspection next time I am over, am working a lot on trail design in Floyds Fork project.

    Woody Keen
    Trail Dynamics LLC

  36. #36
    I4NI
    Reputation: S_Trek's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1,222
    Quote Originally Posted by BonkedAgain View Post
    Holy crap! My arms hurt just looking at that!

    LOL, I was thinking the same when looking at the pics
    There....Are... Four...Lights!

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodman View Post
    Really nice looking rock work. I have been in Cherokee Park, but have never seen this. I will need to get out for an inspection next time I am over, am working a lot on trail design in Floyds Fork project.

    Woody Keen
    Trail Dynamics LLC
    Thanks Woody, let me know the next time your in town, I will give you a tour of the work we did in 2011 at Cherokee and Waverly....here are few more pics from 2011 work

    Cherokee:








    Waverly Flow Trails








  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,417
    Super sweet looking work. All that has been done since I last visited Waverly and CP. WE have 2 staff over for the next 2-4 weeks working on horse trails in Jeff Mem, I will tell them to bring bikes. That will be WaterBob and Shrimper.

    Not sure when I will be back again, but spring for sure. More design work at Floyds Fork and we are getting south in the that project where we plan for a full bike park. Yes, a bike park in Lville.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Woody we are betting on it! And planning to leverage the work being planned out there to create a destination urban trail system here in Louisville.

    L. Ron thanks, we are working with reclaimed 18"x18"x9" and 9"x18"x6" stones from a demolished wall at the Speed Museum in downtown L'Ville courtesy of Metro Parks and The Olmsted Conservancy.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Wow. You just gave a reason to head to Newfoundland. Awesome.
    If you (or anyone else) ends up coming out here, drop me a PM and I'll show you the trails or if I can't, I'll connect you up with some other locals.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Davis View Post
    Woody we are betting on it! And planning to leverage the work being planned out there to create a destination urban trail system here in Louisville.

    L. Ron thanks, we are working with reclaimed 18"x18"x9" and 9"x18"x6" stones from a demolished wall at the Speed Museum in downtown L'Ville courtesy of Metro Parks and The Olmsted Conservancy.
    That's awesome! Looks like those stones are great trail building materials.

    Those trails look like a lot of fun. Great berms!

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    260
    If yer one of them people what sticks their tongue out when concentrating or in a "strain" you're in big trouble on some of them trails.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    26
    some nice sections in this video
    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/9_mclE7if8E?hd=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by Lewisnott View Post
    some nice sections in this video
    Where's the rocks?

  45. #45
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    Video borders on being bike shop spam, certainly NOT relevant to this discussion.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BacDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    665
    [/QUOTE]

    That is one sweet berm! The slope, radius and pitch look perfect - nice work guys.

  47. #47
    Hermit
    Reputation: swampboy62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    990
    Rock garden at West Branch, OH.





    Steve Z
    Pedaling when it's dry
    And paddling when it's wet

    My insignificant blog:
    http://swampboy62.blogspot.com/

  48. #48
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Bike shop spam? I don't follow that. Seems being a 20 poster he misunderstood the thread though.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    48
    Awesome stuff from everybody! Not a whole lot of trails like that around me, but you guys are making the most of it. Riding in that terrain regularly must really improve your technical skills.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    598
    For us rocks are everywhere. Dirt is actually harder to find. The past few years we have been rerouting an old hiking trail that runs through some extreme grades and numerous talus areas and water spillways. You are probably thinking 'why put a trail there?' ... It just so happens that this thin corridor is our only legal option, so we agreed to work with the hikers on this, and the result has been amazing for technical XC riders. I would not say that we build rock features, but aim to construct the best possible route which ends up being almost all rock gardens.

    We have used come alongs, sparticus (chain basket) and mostly manual labor. No machines able to get this far in to work b/c of the location, steep grades and rocks.

    Rock movers video:
    Jorba Rock Movers - YouTube

    Last years work:
    Ringwood Ramapo Trail Project - YouTube

    I went out for a ride a week ago and ran into dozens of people riding the trail and stoked on the new route. It is so rewarding when you are part of building something and it is well received by so many.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-warm-1.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-warm-2.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-wrm-turn.jpg  


  51. #51
    ~*~*~*~*~
    Reputation: oldbroad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    590
    Quote Originally Posted by pixy View Post
    ......

    I went out for a ride a week ago and ran into dozens of people riding the trail and stoked on the new route. It is so rewarding when you are part of building something and it is well received by so many.
    Beautifully done! And, nicely said. :-)

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by pixy View Post
    For us rocks are everywhere. Dirt is actually harder to find. The past few years we have been rerouting an old hiking trail that runs through some extreme grades and numerous talus areas and water spillways. You are probably thinking 'why put a trail there?' ... It just so happens that this thin corridor is our only legal option, so we agreed to work with the hikers on this, and the result has been amazing for technical XC riders. I would not say that we build rock features, but aim to construct the best possible route which ends up being almost all rock gardens.

    We have used come alongs, sparticus (chain basket) and mostly manual labor. No machines able to get this far in to work b/c of the location, steep grades and rocks.

    Rock movers video:
    Jorba Rock Movers - YouTube

    Last years work:
    Ringwood Ramapo Trail Project - YouTube

    I went out for a ride a week ago and ran into dozens of people riding the trail and stoked on the new route. It is so rewarding when you are part of building something and it is well received by so many.
    Pixy nice work looks like a lot of fun.

    Thanks to all the KyMBA Louisville volunteers our current trail is coming together. This 9' diameter turn is complete and challenging staying true to this trails' character.












  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    66
    ^ that's beautiful work.

  54. #54
    Hermit
    Reputation: swampboy62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    990
    Here's a picture of a rock tread we started building this weekend at Beaver Creek State Park in eastern Ohio. There were so many big round rocks there one trail worker dubbed the area "the cannonball farm".



    Next time we'll finish off the rock and pack some dirt in.

    Lots more rock work to do, including two stream crossings...

    Steve Z
    Pedaling when it's dry
    And paddling when it's wet

    My insignificant blog:
    http://swampboy62.blogspot.com/

  55. #55
    Builder of Trails
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    797
    Here's a boulder ride I built about 3.5 years ago. A before and after picture, each from a slightly different angle than the other. I built three lines, the main one, one over the boulder on the right in this picture, and a bypass with racks to avoid.

    D

    Post edit: I don' t know why these attached pictures format side-by-side instead of on top of each other.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-before.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-after.jpg  


  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Nicely done gentleman. Rock work is rewarding for sure. We have to deliver all of our rocks a torn down stone wall or other donors from the "rock lot". Most of our rock work is hardening fall lines. Wish I could figure out how to build a steep climb that's sustainable without all the rock work?

  57. #57
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    Let's see if this image link works....



    A stone bridge I installed two weeks ago. The stone on top was a few (3, 4?) hundred pounds easily. Moved it into place with a rope puller, rock bar, improvised levers, log rollers, and 3 extra pairs of hands.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    636


    ^ This is a work of art

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cheezecake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by RaveOn View Post


    ^ This is a work of art
    That looks really awesome! Is that also a hiking trail? im assuming it is because that turn is nice and flat.

  60. #60
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    Let's see if this image link works....



    A stone bridge I installed two weeks ago. The stone on top was a few (3, 4?) hundred pounds easily. Moved it into place with a rope puller, rock bar, improvised levers, log rollers, and 3 extra pairs of hands.
    That is a work of art to me. What a magic arch. Doing that without machinery - not for the faint hearted. How many attempts did it take to get the bridge to lock into place? Also like the B line skinny option - nice touch

  61. #61
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    How many attempts did it take to get the bridge to lock into place? Also like the B line skinny option - nice touch
    I had a hell of a time getting it out of the ground where I plucked it from. I didn't expect it to be that thick or rounded on the bottom. Once it was out of the ground and on the log rollers and with some extra hands, it was an easier task. The pie shaped rock on the left just happened to be in the right place at the right time. Someone jammed it in there as we were nudging the big rock into place and it worked.

    It didn't occur to me that the root in the foreground could be ridden as a B line, but now that you've mentioned it, I will have to try it.

    There are some amazing, epic stone bridges in this area, not my work but the work of others, all done by hand and most not even with the aid of a rope puller or winch. I will take some pictures this weekend and post.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Yup nice fit on that bridge Ray Looks like art work!

    Thanks for the props cheesecake, rave, and deezler.

    Yep multiuse trail with texbook drainage out the back. The tight radius makes a nice challenge with the ledge so close but the flatness balances the difficulty for those who dab. Nice vista there of the creek as well.

    BTW all hand built by the KyMBA volunteers.


  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    Let's see if this image link works....



    A stone bridge I installed two weeks ago. The stone on top was a few (3, 4?) hundred pounds easily. Moved it into place with a rope puller, rock bar, improvised levers, log rollers, and 3 extra pairs of hands.
    Very nice! Is this at SMH?

  64. #64
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    Very nice! Is this at SMH?
    Yes, at intersection #53, (Cannonball/Ridgetop/Outback)

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    Yes, at intersection #53, (Cannonball/Ridgetop/Outback)
    I have a vague idea of where that is. Definitely been through there though. I only get to ride SMH once a year these days so I'm not really familiar with where everything is these days. Outback didn't even exist when I left Ottawa. Ridgetop did but it was only a year or two old. We used to ride in directly across from the GFR parking lot to the hydro cut and across the tracks to get into Ridgetop and such. Love those trails, though and there is a lot of really nice rock work and general trail work done in there. Are you affiliated with OMBA?

  66. #66
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    I have a vague idea of where that is. Definitely been through there though. I only get to ride SMH once a year these days so I'm not really familiar with where everything is these days. Outback didn't even exist when I left Ottawa. Ridgetop did but it was only a year or two old. We used to ride in directly across from the GFR parking lot to the hydro cut and across the tracks to get into Ridgetop and such. Love those trails, though and there is a lot of really nice rock work and general trail work done in there. Are you affiliated with OMBA?
    Yes, I've been with OMBA since 2008. You are in for some surprises next time your ride, some pleasant, some not as much. On the plus side, there was a lot of maintenance work done last year, a new boardwalk installed, new signs, and a new shortcut trail option added to Outback. On the negative side, most of the area south of the new highway is slated for development. You may still be able to enter from GFR, but not for long.

    There is a lot of beautiful rock work done in there. I will take some photos tomorrow and share.

    I like looking at photos of other people's trail work. I call it trail porn.

    Thanks to the original poster for starting this thread. It should be made a sticky.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    Yes, I've been with OMBA since 2008. You are in for some surprises next time your ride, some pleasant, some not as much. On the plus side, there was a lot of maintenance work done last year, a new boardwalk installed, new signs, and a new shortcut trail option added to Outback. On the negative side, most of the area south of the new highway is slated for development. You may still be able to enter from GFR, but not for long.

    There is a lot of beautiful rock work done in there. I will take some photos tomorrow and share.

    I like looking at photos of other people's trail work. I call it trail porn.

    Thanks to the original poster for starting this thread. It should be made a sticky.
    I've seen a good bit of the new stuff, I rode there in September. Awesome work for sure! Back again quickly in June, hopefully get a ride in out there. John O'Dea is one of my best friends in the world, so I ride with him whenever I'm in Ottawa.

    I love trail porn as well. It's always great to see the work other people are doing and to steal ideas for our local trails.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    27
    Built this yesterday with some friends. It is a seasonal wet spot at the start of a causeway with a culvert for the primary stream. It was a treat to have 3 big, flat stones near at hand, most of our local rock is rounded granite stones & boulders. We added another couple of rocks on the near side to cover a bit more of the drainage and form a ramp onto the flat.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-hl-stone-causeway.jpg  


  69. #69
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    Some stuff I've worked on...

    I don't know how to place the images one under the other. Please forgive me!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-002.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-003.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-006.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-007.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-008.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-035.jpg  


  70. #70
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    Stuff others have built at SMH....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-078.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-076.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-064.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-066.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-028.jpg  


  71. #71
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    More work by others at SMH....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-063.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-031.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-029.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-020.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-011.jpg  


  72. #72
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    Building a rock bridge on Rockhopper at South March Highlands....

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/OvEEIhrOBL8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  73. #73
    trail gnome
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    683
    Finally, a small sampling of what the last ice age left behind for us. I believe this section is called "The Wall". We are lucky to have lots of rock outcroppings like this to route trails over.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-069.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-may-2012-072.jpg  

    Last edited by ray.vermette; 05-17-2012 at 08:44 PM.

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Good looking work Ray

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    97
    Some beautiful work by all! Ray that rock bridge is killer! Looks like some great country to ride in. Here's a sweet little spot on my local trail....I didn't build it but sure would love to buy a beer for whoever did!


  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    Finally, a small sampling of what the last ice age left behind for us. I believe this section is called "The Wall". We are lucky to have lots of rock outcroppings like this to route trails over.
    A lot of the pics you posted are familiar to me, but I'm intimately familiar with this section...
    A bunch of years ago I had a bad g-out at the bottom of the rock there, the bike went out from under me and I landed on my tailbone and slid into that tree in the foreground of the first pic. Ow. There is lots of excellent rock work at SMH. It's an awesome trail system, keep up the good work!

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44

    How about berms

    We just put this berm over a half culvert in at Waverly Park in Louisville





    And a rocked line at Cherokee No Net


  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    66
    Sweet. This thread is rad. I need to do some rock work.

  79. #79
    boxcar
    Reputation: mtn.skratch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    564
    Here are some shots of rock sections on the first trail I am building on my property:

    The First is about 125 yards into the trail and is a short, steep rock garden into a left which goes into the switchback in the second photo and then into the roller/drop in the third photo.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-otter-rd-bungalo-2012-252-sm.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-otter-rd-bungalo-2012-257-sm.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-otter-rd-bungalo-2012-260-sm.jpg  


  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    66
    ^ wow. That's a lot of rocks. You have your work cut out for ya!

  81. #81
    boxcar
    Reputation: mtn.skratch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by deezler View Post
    ^ wow. That's a lot of rocks. You have your work cut out for ya!
    Yeah I'm sure it will be a continuous effort for quite some time

    It took me a few days of finding the right rocks and fitting them together for the first garden. The terrain is very rocky; like every shovel stroke hits rock, rocky but there is some good dirt too. I've packed a couple lips and tranny's too. Here is a different photo of the rock garden from Pic 1 that better shows the run out and some dirt trail...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-img_1400-sm.jpg  


  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    54

    Rock Garden for Handcycle trail

    I helped build this last year for a local hand cycle club. I have a new appreciation for how difficult it is to build a proper rock garden.










  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Awesome work! Excavator is a good helper.

  84. #84
    Zach Attack
    Reputation: zachi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    174

    Rock Gardens and other Stoned work

    Here is a elevated turnpike adjacent the main trail. This B route is 5 ft off the ground at highest point.

    Bridge in background utilized four types of native stone sorted for color.

    More photos on site.

    cheers...

    z

  85. #85
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    zachi, any chance of you posting a larger version of your turnpike pic? It looks really interesting.

  86. #86
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    zachi, any chance of you posting a larger version of your turnpike pic? It looks really interesting.
    The rockmeister zachi is on dialup, so let me help.



    Look through the FTA Gallery for amazing rock work.
    Forest Trails Alliance

    There is a video on the main page that has some guys riding it too, cannot remember how far in.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    336
    Wow! The turn is beautiful and the bridge is absolutely stunning! Love it.

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Yep that tops em all right there....that took some time

  89. #89
    Zach Attack
    Reputation: zachi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    174
    Here is another stone turnpike at another creek crossing we just built Saturday. The thumb on the exc makes moving 3000lb stones a breeze...fitting them is another story...


    I have not updated photos on the website gallery for two years...sorry. More stuff at our facebook..so much easier...

    Thanks Slocaus for getting a larger photo

    z

  90. #90
    Machine Trail Builder
    Reputation: Fletcher-Love's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by zachi View Post
    Here is a elevated turnpike adjacent the main trail. This B route is 5 ft off the ground at highest point.

    Bridge in background utilized four types of native stone sorted for color.

    More photos on site.

    cheers...

    z
    Its pictures like this that keep me checking this website. Nicely done! The bridge is amazing, but its the sense of flow I get from the shape of the rock wall and ride around that really does it for me. Cool!

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    97
    Wow Zachi that's phenominal! Beautiful work

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    88
    10-4 to that. I snip the branches out of the way and let bikes pack the trail down. I leave the logs and rocks in the way as obstacles. Way nicer looking and way more interesting. If need be I rake the leaves off to the sides.
    Bill

    '95 Raleigh 400, STX-RC (road, touring)
    '00 Santa Cruz Superlight, XTR (Cross Country Mtb)
    Northern N.J.

  93. #93
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Something a little different with tiny rocks. There are great views through the trees from this spot. There's 2 logs and a number of rocks to sit on or rest bikes on on both sides of the trail. Each spot has a different view of river, ocean, highrise skyline, valley etc. The one under the little stone wall has a recliner chair backrest; nice. All the embedded rocks have buttock-shape contour surfaces
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-p1060364-1.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-p1060329-1.jpg  


  94. #94
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    Rock bench.
    Last edited by slocaus; 08-14-2012 at 03:39 PM.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  95. #95
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Nice bench, thinking throne
    Last edited by Ridnparadise; 08-15-2012 at 12:39 AM.

  96. #96
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,824
    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    Aww, don't be mean. One bench would miss multiple views. Also we don't take any materials in to build with. I'm sad now
    My sincere apologies, I did not even read your post when I put that one up there. I did not build it, part of a huge project that we are working on, bring zachi and his machined in for a massive reroute. I change the wording in mine so it does not appear to refer to your post.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  97. #97
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Thanks mate - I wasn't offended, just kidding really

  98. #98
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,923
    Resurrecting an old thread rather than starting a new one to ask a question that hopefully some people with some experience can answer for me. I'm in the (fortunate, enviable) situation of building a trail that is being supported by metro government. As such, they have an agreement with a materials supplier who will provide us with Rip Rap we can use to supplement natural rocks, to build rock gardens. Now, our natural rock has a much more weathered, rounded feel to it than the rip rap. So here's the question:

    Should we take some of the sharp edges off the rip rap as we're building to blend it better with the natural rock? Leave it alone and mix it up, so some rocks are smooth and others are sharper? Completely ignore it? What's the done thing, and how do people feel about it?


    I promise I'll pay everyone back for answers by posting pictures when we're done. Heck, maybe people have some new pictures of stuff they can post. This thread is freaking awesome.

  99. #99
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LewisQC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    562
    The pic doesn't show it but pretty steep with small stream running there so muddy and slippery...



    Easy one but beautiful with leaves...

  100. #100
    Builder of Trails
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    797
    I took a baby head section and turned it into this:

    Before:

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-before.jpg

    After:

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-after.jpg

    D

  101. #101
    beer thief
    Reputation: radair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,901
    Building a new trail in an old quarry means lots of great rock to work with. A couple of us finished this feature yesterday.

    The trail also runs through an historic latrine building - not really a rock feature but the floor is concrete...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-micah-stone-10-23-13-medium-.jpg  

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-m-ghost-latrine-medium-.jpg  


  102. #102
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    Building a new trail in an old quarry means lots of great rock to work with. A couple of us finished this feature yesterday.

    The trail also runs through an historic latrine building - not really a rock feature but the floor is concrete...
    You could really get yourself into $#!t on that second line

  103. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    372
    All the mortar dirt has wasted in the the cracks and has set the rock in nicely. Not one rock has dislodged it the 80' of rock in over a year of 80,000+ tire tracks. It's a road crossing heads up. We do these at every road crossing.

    Last edited by mtbty; 11-06-2013 at 06:27 PM.
    Epic trails get built in the Northwest by epic people!

    Sustainable quality trails please.

  104. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation: slop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    641
    Hah, we built a trail on an old army base once. We added a jump that went through an old latrine. One of the builders was named Ken, so of course we called it Ken's Crapper.
    Then they decided to demo the latrine and all the trails in the area.

  105. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    96
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-llf-chunder-tech.jpg

    Unfortunately I don't take very many pictures. There is some incredible stuff in MA and more keeps springing up every year.

    The trail system that this picture is from is notorious for having features that don't look as though they were altered by humans but once you look closely you realize that theres no way mother nature paved the way so perfectly for a set of wheels.

  106. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,708
    i know this aint much to look at. actually wish there were some much bigger boulders to do this to. pack some dirt in front and back for some up and over....


  107. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    56

    Rock Features

    Locally we don`t really "build" trails, but do damage repair and trying to make them more sustainable. That includes rerouting and hardening the surface. That being said, after a little bit of effort the new sections actually do stand up to abuse, but trying to keep the local "freeriders" from cutting the corner of every bend and straightlining everything
    is a constant pain. Many obviously don`t share the joy of clearing a rooty, rocky traverse and switchbacks.

    I have found that using natural rock features do allow for more "sustainable" straightlining and keeps the "freeriders" and the freerider in you more satisfied. We receive an annual of 7 feet of rain, and with only 5-10 inches of soil, the rain can be used to our advantage to dig out rocky trail, as long as you make sure to dig a ditch that leads the water out of the trail after you are done.
    New reroute after logging on our initial, soggy trail:

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0389.jpg
    Moss-covered slab. A chicken line around the back of the outcropping, not visible. (slab has about 15-20 feet of drop, so you pick up speed)

    Same section after cutting the soil away with an old mountaineering axe (lightweight bacpack-size mattoc):
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0414.jpg

    Same section after a few rainfalls and 3 months of use:
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0021.jpg

    New reroute of an unsustainable straightline. New traversing section is really boggy: (about 6 feet of climb)
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0331.jpg

    but the pointy end of the axe reveals rock underneath, and after some digging and rockwork, the new "curch`s stair":
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0386.jpg

    The section now clears water well and the 6 feet climb is doable for most riders not on a heavy bike.
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0388.jpg
    It does look a little bit untidy, but the scars will probably grow over next summer.

    Further rockwork on the continuing traverse:
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0038.jpg

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0009.jpg

    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0037.jpg

    A muddy straightline has a slab underneath. Trail turns to the right imidiately after the slab and water is cleared straight ahead.: (about 8 feet of drop)
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0514.jpg

    Luckily, a lot of the local rock bed is made up of porous slab that can be broken up and used for armoring. In this section a small drainage ditch will probably also be required.
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dsc_0010.jpg

    I feel that using rock features creatively will enable you to build "sustainable" trails in an environment that otherwise would not enable that.
    Tyre marks on rock surfaces are not so obtrusive to hikers and land managers as tyre marks over soggy sections, and increases the acceptance of mtb`rs. Clearing vegetation and debris off rocks and slabs makes the trail look tidier, and less "wrecked by mountainbikers", the psychological benefit is tantamount.
    Interesting features makes the trail challenging and keeps the adrenaline running for the "freeriders".

  108. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,411
    Ynot where are your trails located?

  109. #109
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,923
    We put this in this past weekend on a new trail system being built. It's more of a playground than a rock garden, with a play line (techy) fast line, and a chicken line. Coming back up it looks absolutely mental, but cleans pretty easily.


    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-2013-11-09-11.21.36.jpg

  110. #110
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,187
    Quote Originally Posted by YnotGorilla View Post
    Locally we don`t really "build" trails, but do damage repair and trying to make them more sustainable. That includes rerouting and hardening the surface. That being said, after a little bit of effort the new sections actually do stand up to abuse, but trying to keep the local "freeriders" from cutting the corner of every bend and straightlining everything
    is a constant pain. Many obviously don`t share the joy of clearing a rooty, rocky traverse and switchbacks.

    I have found that using natural rock features do allow for more "sustainable" straightlining and keeps the "freeriders" and the freerider in you more satisfied. We receive an annual of 7 feet of rain, and with only 5-10 inches of soil, the rain can be used to our advantage to dig out rocky trail, as long as you make sure to dig a ditch that leads the water out of the trail after you are done.
    New reroute after logging on our initial, soggy trail:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0389.jpg 
Views:	223 
Size:	46.3 KB 
ID:	846791
    Moss-covered slab. A chicken line around the back of the outcropping, not visible. (slab has about 15-20 feet of drop, so you pick up speed)

    Same section after cutting the soil away with an old mountaineering axe (lightweight bacpack-size mattoc):
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0414.jpg 
Views:	158 
Size:	41.3 KB 
ID:	846792

    Same section after a few rainfalls and 3 months of use:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0021.jpg 
Views:	149 
Size:	49.8 KB 
ID:	846793

    New reroute of an unsustainable straightline. New traversing section is really boggy: (about 6 feet of climb)
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0331.jpg 
Views:	152 
Size:	37.0 KB 
ID:	846794

    but the pointy end of the axe reveals rock underneath, and after some digging and rockwork, the new "curch`s stair":
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0386.jpg 
Views:	266 
Size:	53.6 KB 
ID:	846795

    The section now clears water well and the 6 feet climb is doable for most riders not on a heavy bike.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0388.jpg 
Views:	177 
Size:	45.6 KB 
ID:	846796
    It does look a little bit untidy, but the scars will probably grow over next summer.

    Further rockwork on the continuing traverse:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0038.jpg 
Views:	176 
Size:	55.5 KB 
ID:	846799

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0009.jpg 
Views:	152 
Size:	56.8 KB 
ID:	846800

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0037.jpg 
Views:	170 
Size:	63.7 KB 
ID:	846798

    A muddy straightline has a slab underneath. Trail turns to the right imidiately after the slab and water is cleared straight ahead.: (about 8 feet of drop)
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0514.jpg 
Views:	264 
Size:	38.9 KB 
ID:	846797

    Luckily, a lot of the local rock bed is made up of porous slab that can be broken up and used for armoring. In this section a small drainage ditch will probably also be required.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0010.jpg 
Views:	654 
Size:	62.6 KB 
ID:	846801

    I feel that using rock features creatively will enable you to build "sustainable" trails in an environment that otherwise would not enable that.
    Tyre marks on rock surfaces are not so obtrusive to hikers and land managers as tyre marks over soggy sections, and increases the acceptance of mtb`rs. Clearing vegetation and debris off rocks and slabs makes the trail look tidier, and less "wrecked by mountainbikers", the psychological benefit is tantamount.
    Interesting features makes the trail challenging and keeps the adrenaline running for the "freeriders".
    That's a really good explanation. I like the idea you can trick riders into enjoying something they would normally ride past. That's good trail management. We have too many people locally who continue to close logical braids believing the original line must be the only line. In addition, using natural features cannot be overstated.

    I only wish we had more bedrock here. We get less rain than you do - about 1800mm vrs your 2100mm, but unfortunately there is usually up to half a metre of soil with floating stones over bedrock broken by roots and therefore prone to subsoil water movement. Under that is clay. It is very hard to naturally armour and we are not able to bring rock in. Therefore we tend to have to bench heavily and it does not look natural. I think that has something to do with the locals feeling it is overkill.

    Thanks for a good post.

  111. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TORQUE-29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    189
    Not sure which I like working with more.. rocks or wood.

    Here's a rock line transiting onto a large boulder.
    Post up your &quot;Rock&quot; gardens or features...-dscf3067.jpg

  112. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DeftJester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by DhRoadStar View Post
    I helped build this last year for a local hand cycle club. I have a new appreciation for how difficult it is to build a proper rock garden.









    Omg that looks amazing. The stuff trail dreams are made of.

  113. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,708
    Some buddies and I took a trip to the Northeast and hit Highland MTB park in New Hampshire.

    Here were two natural-rock-wall features:

    Highland MTB Park - New Hampshire by austinmtbbmxalliance | Photobucket






Similar Threads

  1. Can a Clyde "flow" through rock gardens?
    By SWriverstone in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 10-23-2010, 01:34 PM
  2. Gurls who Ride "ROCK" Post Pics here!
    By NEPMTBA in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-25-2008, 08:40 PM
  3. Roots, and other "traditional" advanced features
    By jmurray in forum Trail Building and Advocacy
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-03-2007, 08:55 PM
  4. commuters: tail lights with "features"
    By hmann_48823 in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-16-2005, 04:37 PM

Members who have read this thread: 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.