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  1. #1
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    pocket chainsaw

    anyone have any recommendations for a pocket chainsaw for trail maintenance? are they actually useful?
    I'm never gonna be a Rock Star

  2. #2
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    You mean like this one that was roundly mocked about 10 months ago?

    EDIT- actually as I skim that old thread I see someone posted a loose chain with handles and referred to it as a pocket chainsaw. So... maybe?

  3. #3
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    You'll likely do better with a SILKY Katanaboy/Bigboy etc.
    Pricing is all over the place on SILKY saws = good deals to be had by looking around.

  4. #4
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    pocket chainsaws with loops, (actual chains)
    you put a stick in each loop as a handle and then start sawing ?

    they work, but will rip your arms and shoulders, and takes forever to cut something big. takes forever to cut something small too. just too much time and way too much effort.

    I categorize them as very useless...

    recommend: get a folding silky bigboy which will fit in most camelbaks, now you can cut a ton of stuff fast. if not a bigboy (14 inch) then any folding silky. these things rip through wood very fast.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  5. #5
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    i've got a folding saw which is an awesome tool, i just have some bigger stuff that's too big for the folding saw. the chainsaw chain with the two handles is what i'm looking for.
    I'm never gonna be a Rock Star

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    pocket chainsaws with loops, (actual chains)
    you put a stick in each loop as a handle and then start sawing ?

    they work, but will rip your arms and shoulders, and takes forever to cut something big. takes forever to cut something small too. just too much time and way too much effort.

    I categorize them as very useless...

    recommend: get a folding silky bigboy which will fit in most camelbaks, now you can cut a ton of stuff fast. if not a bigboy (14 inch) then any folding silky. these things rip through wood very fast.
    good to know. thanks.
    I'm never gonna be a Rock Star

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megashnauzer View Post
    i've got a folding saw which is an awesome tool, i just have some bigger stuff that's too big for the folding saw. the chainsaw chain with the two handles is what i'm looking for.
    Quote Originally Posted by 11053 View Post
    You'll likely do better with a SILKY Katanaboy/Bigboy etc.
    Pricing is all over the place on SILKY saws = good deals to be had by looking around.
    A Katanaboy will tackle anything you're likely to run into outside of monster old growth in far less time than a pocket chainsaw. Using one of those by yourself sucks, it's only marginally better if there are two of you. A Bigboy is my go to on rides where I might have to clear deadfall, the Katanaboy when I'm planning on it. As was noted, a Bigboy fits in a pack and is easy to carry, I strap my Katanaboy on the outside.

    A Katanaboy cut this tree in 4 minutes.
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  8. #8
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    for pocketchainsaws...

    ok I will tell you

    this one specifically,
    because it packs the smallest (but see mods below you may need to do)


    now, toss the two metal loops out...those are to use two found sticks as dowels for handles.

    problem is I ripped those welds open after three trees

    so, get an old bicycle chain, that uses wider pins (think 7-9 speed chain) and
    connect about 6-8 links on each end in a loop, so a chain pin is connected to
    the saw on each end and you have two loops made from bike chain to insert sticks as handles and now you can rrr-iii-ppp thru with far less risk of a handle blowout

    done right it can still curl up into the can and close the lid with the bike chain loops installed.

    forget these handles as seen below, I'd rip those apart or the metal rings would rip, either way 'tis a weakness in this saw...hence bike chain beefification
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryman View Post
    A Katanaboy cut this tree in 4 minutes.
    The XL Katanaboy looks awesome.

    Unless you need something to fit in your backpack while you ride, nothing wrong with a sharp, quality ax. With some practice you can cut through a 24" tree in a couple minutes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapva View Post
    The XL Katanaboy looks awesome.

    Unless you need something to fit in your backpack while you ride, nothing wrong with a sharp, quality ax. With some practice you can cut through a 24" tree in a couple minutes.
    I would be really impressed to see a video of you chopping through a 24" bole in a few minutes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ki5ka View Post
    I would be really impressed to see a video of you chopping through a 24" bole in a few minutes.
    Yeah you're right, could be closer to 2 1/2 minutes...
    https://youtu.be/0vtMsH6KhK4

    I'm not quite in that class, and a bit slower than I used to be. But up against a pocket chain, it's no contest.

  12. #12
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    Katanaboy 650mm...
    https://youtu.be/_KryxktLOqE

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapva View Post
    cool!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapva View Post
    Yeah you're right, could be closer to 2 1/2 minutes...
    https://youtu.be/0vtMsH6KhK4

    I'm not quite in that class, and a bit slower than I used to be. But up against a pocket chain, it's no contest.
    Ok but at the beginning your chain is going to be in contact with about half the circumference of the tree, which would be about 3 feet of wood. That's a lot of friction and you gonna get tired. But you may be a manly man.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Ok but at the beginning your chain is going to be in contact with about half the circumference of the tree, which would be about 3 feet of wood. That's a lot of friction and you gonna get tired. But you may be a manly man.
    Think you misunderstood that comment. I'd bet on the ax being at least 4x faster than a pocket chain.

  16. #16
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    Oh yeah, I did. Axe for sure. Also would be super cool to carry an axe on your back riding around. Viking style.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Oh yeah, I did. Axe for sure. Also would be super cool to carry an axe on your back riding around. Viking style.
    Lol! Add to that the 1000mm Katanaboy and you might have the trails all to yourself no questions asked

  18. #18
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    I've got some Black&Decker 20v tools, including a small chainsaw. I love the leaf blower and hedge trimmer, but the chainsaw is useless (the hedge trimmer is amazing for trail maintenance). I have a lot of experience with real chainsaws, and other handsaws (but not the Silky that everyone loves). The chain removes a 3/16" or whatever width of material, which takes a lot of energy, and it barely works at all, almost any saw or ax would be faster. The thinner (and sharper) the blade means less material to remove, and less required energy.
    For trail maint I have a small backpack that I carry a 10" ish bow saw in, the bow saw blade if very thin, and cuts pretty fast, WAY faster than the chainsaw, the electric chainsaw would have to be much more than 20v to work well imo. My saw is very effective on blow-downs up to about 6". I've carried a small ax in my pack on occasion, the handle sticks out 10" or so, which was not a problem until it somehow got caught in a chain link fence adjacent to the trail while descending in one spot; it caught and I pitched over and landed on my side, injured my hand and bruised a rib, so be careful riding with something sticking out of your pack. In softer or partially rotted logs the ax can be really fast. The old-timers with a good double bitted ax were really fast.
    If I were doing a lot of small blow-downs, I'd be interested in trying a cordless electric sawz-all.
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimPacNW View Post
    If I were doing a lot of small blow-downs, I'd be interested in trying a cordless electric sawz-all.
    For anything less that 10", I've found it easier and faster to remove the limbs and just drag it off the trail in one piece. A lot depends on what kind of terrain and how wet the log is, but on a bed of wet leaves it is surprising how much weight you can pull.

  20. #20
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    To each their own. I keep this pocket chainsaw in my backpack on every ride - https://www.amazon.com/Sportsman-Poc...chainsaw&psc=1

    I find it worth the size and weight addition to my back pack for those times I find a tree down while I was intending to 'just ride'. I have had several folding saws that are better for small branches. I prefer the pocket chain saw for anything over about 2" diameter.

    The greener the wood is, the better the pocket chainsaw cuts. Old dead dried oaks take a lot of time and effort.

  21. #21
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    For $20 this is great to have. I've used this for the last year or so it works great for anything up to about 10-12". Light and easy to throw in pack. Fall and Spring we get lots of small to mid sized blowdowns and it handles most stuff we come across during a ride. Anything bigger I pass...not the right tool!

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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    for pocketchainsaws...

    ok I will tell you

    this one specifically,
    because it packs the smallest (but see mods below you may need to do)


    now, toss the two metal loops out...those are to use two found sticks as dowels for handles.

    problem is I ripped those welds open after three trees

    so, get an old bicycle chain, that uses wider pins (think 7-9 speed chain) and
    connect about 6-8 links on each end in a loop, so a chain pin is connected to
    the saw on each end and you have two loops made from bike chain to insert sticks as handles and now you can rrr-iii-ppp thru with far less risk of a handle blowout

    done right it can still curl up into the can and close the lid with the bike chain loops installed.

    forget these handles as seen below, I'd rip those apart or the metal rings would rip, either way 'tis a weakness in this saw...hence bike chain beefification
    ^^^I have one of these and I really wanted it to work, but they are pretty sucky. I even reground the teeth with my Dremel which helped a lot, but I still prefer my $10 Flexrake folding saw. I knocked every 4th tooth off of it and widened the kerf just a tad, so it really hogs through some wood now.

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  23. #23
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    I have this one from REI: https://www.rei.com/product/775079/u...s-sabercut-saw
    Honestly it sucks and I rarely use it. It's hard to use by yourself on bigger trees and works best as a two man saw. As stated it works better on fresh green wood than old dry wood. I could only see it being of use if you ride or maintain very remote trails where carrying in a larger saw or powered chainsaw would be difficult.

    For anything 6-8" or less my Silky saw is the best easily portable option: https://www.amazon.com/Silky-Profess.../dp/B00B19ICM2

    Anything over 8" I just go home and get my electric chainsaw carried in my Evoc Trail Builder pack, as the parks I work in are generally easily accessible and it's never more than a 20-30 minute hike to a fallen tree.

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