Looking for a "wheelbarrow"- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    aka: SpeedyChix
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    Looking for a "wheelbarrow"

    Looking for a good solution for moving prebuilt bridge sections, dirt, rocks, etc. on the trail. Have a large 10 cu ft. dual wheel wheelbarrow but the width of the wheels often exceeds the width of the trail bed. Thought I'd seen a dual wheel unit where they were right next to each other. Not finding it. Any suggestions? Thanks.

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  2. #2
    beater
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    Game cart.

  3. #3
    aka: SpeedyChix
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    Quote Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    Game cart.
    Good suggestion. For our trail surfaces, the narrow wheels would be problematic. Also want to be able to haul rocks and dirt.

  4. #4
    beater
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyChix View Post
    Good suggestion. For our trail surfaces, the narrow wheels would be problematic. Also want to be able to haul rocks and dirt.
    Canvas buckets/totes work for that. What type of trail surface?

  5. #5
    aka: SpeedyChix
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    Midwest dirt with some clay. The areas for this work are frequently marshy to wet/muddy. Moving small rocks from 500-750' and not via trail but overland. Working on a "cobbles" line to cross over a chronic area while not making it look inviting to the ATVs that trespass. Frequently our "borrow pits" for dirt are also coming from a distance. That's why we have been using a wheelbarrow. Would like an even wider track up front for stability.

  6. #6
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    One of our " solutions" was using the HS football team to move stuff. They needed some community service credits, all good. Seen a powered wheelbarrow? Rent?

  7. #7
    aka: SpeedyChix
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    One of our " solutions" was using the HS football team to move stuff. They needed some community service credits, all good. Seen a powered wheelbarrow? Rent?
    Had a local wrestling and softball team help in an area this spring. They were motivated and moved a lot of material. We hope to repeat that next spring.

    Renting a powered wheelbarrow could be the solution for this round. Thanks!

  8. #8
    since 4/10/2009
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    I've used one of those two-wheeled wheelbarrows for trail work. It sucks. Sure, the wheelbarrow has a great capacity, but the stupid things get hung up on itty bitty roots, small undulations in the ground, and in your case, will get hung up in the brush.

    IMO, you'd be better off with a 4-wheeled garden cart.

    I have pretty much abandoned using a wheelbarrow for home use since I got a fairly light duty garden cart with fat tires and a dump bed.

    For pre-built bridge sections, just bolt a couple of wheels onto them and pull them out to the install site. Remove wheels and install. That method works great. I've also floated pre-built bridge sections across a lake, towing them with a canoe, to reduce the distance they needed to travel overland.

  9. #9
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    I have found dual-wheeled wheelbarrows with 2 wheels close to the center much more difficult to steer than a regular 1-wheeled wheelbarrow. Especially when the trail is uneven or rocky. I wouldn't recommend it.

    For moving bridge sections, one of our trail crew members knows how to weld, and he fabricated a device that is basically a unicycle with a bracket and straps for holding 2 prefab bridge sections. The unicycle wheel, balanced in the middle, takes the brunt of the weight, with a crew member in the front and back to guide it. That works well, as long as the prefab bridge sections are about the same width & length.

    When the terrain is too uneven to use that device, we use mover's carrying straps to take the weight off the arms and put it on the shoulder's of the carrier.

    For moving small rocks or dirt over uneven terrain, I bought a canoe yoke, drilled one hole in either end, fed about 2-3' of rope though the holes, and tied the ropes to 2 buckets. Fill up the buckets with rocks or dirt, and carry using the yoke. You carry the weight on your shoulders, your arms don't get tired, and the buckets don't constantly bang against your legs as they would if you were carrying them by hand.
    Mountain bikers are generally a rational bunch...until someone moves a rock on our favorite trail and we lose our minds - LMN

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    For moving bridge sections, one of our trail crew members knows how to weld, and he fabricated a device that is basically a unicycle with a bracket and straps for holding 2 prefab bridge sections.
    Kinda sounds like one of these rescue litters.

  11. #11
    trail gnome
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    Yes, same principle.
    Mountain bikers are generally a rational bunch...until someone moves a rock on our favorite trail and we lose our minds - LMN

  12. #12
    K&K
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    ... I've also floated pre-built bridge sections across a lake, towing them with a canoe...
    Harold, I hope to meet you some day!

  13. #13
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by ki5ka View Post
    Harold, I hope to meet you some day!
    Would be cool to ride together. I've met a bunch of people from mtbr over the years. but we live kinda far apart. Lol.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    aka: SpeedyChix
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    Thanks for some additional ideas to work with!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyChix View Post
    Looking for a good solution for moving prebuilt bridge sections, dirt, rocks, etc. on the trail.
    I've used pre-built bridge sections as a sled to haul other stuff (mattock, drill, screws, floaters). Have also used a dolly to haul pavers after my forearms gave out. Easiest solution I have seen is an ATV pulling a sled.

    Personally, don't see any wheelbarrow as practical unless it is exceptionally smooth and flat where you are. Even if you have two wheels for stability, the fact that is has zero resistance going downhill tends to be a problem, and going up it gets stuck on everything.

  16. #16
    Rides like a girl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I've used one of those two-wheeled wheelbarrows for trail work. It sucks. Sure, the wheelbarrow has a great capacity, but the stupid things get hung up on itty bitty roots, small undulations in the ground, and in your case, will get hung up in the brush.

    IMO, you'd be better off with a 4-wheeled garden cart.

    I have pretty much abandoned using a wheelbarrow for home use since I got a fairly light duty garden cart with fat tires and a dump bed.

    For pre-built bridge sections, just bolt a couple of wheels onto them and pull them out to the install site. Remove wheels and install. That method works great. I've also floated pre-built bridge sections across a lake, towing them with a canoe, to reduce the distance they needed to travel overland.
    Oh Harold. You're so smart!
    17 Kona Hei Hei Trail 27.5
    15 Framed Minnesota 3.0XWT

  17. #17
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotHead View Post
    Oh Harold. You're so smart!
    None were my idea, but I happily went along with them.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  18. #18
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    I find a wheelbarrow can be very useful in the right circumstance. But they don't work well to haul bigger loads longer distances on rougher trails. They tend to shine in spots where I'm trying to move a lot of dirt over a distance that is too long to scrape or throw. Like making an in-sloped turn, or a roller behind a tree to cover roots and make the grade reverse. Or hauling fill to make the back side of a rock shelf into a rollable feature. Or gathering rocks to construct a wall for the bottom leg of a switchback. It really helps if there is a close by access point to drive the wheelbarrow to, as opposed to rolling it over singletrack for an extended distance.

    Not so much for moving timbers.

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