Logging in Robinson State Park - Agawam MA- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Steam Donkey
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    Logging in Robinson State Park - Agawam MA

    Hello,
    Logging is planned for Robinson State Park in Agawam, Massachusetts. Concerned users are organizing to STOP this unnecessary and destructive logging operation. You can help. Please see below...


    The first stages of a Logging operation (Timber Sale) in Robinson State Park are underway. The forest will be clear-cut in places, and be left all-but leveled in others. Damage from heavy equipment will be extensive. There is blue and yellow paint on numerous trees. Trees painted blue are to be cut for lumber. Trees painted yellow mark the future road for heavy equipment access, and will also be cut for lumber.

    The reason for the logging is a "shoe string fungus" affecting some of the Red Pines. The Red Pines were planted in the 1930’s by the CCC and are not native to this area. Mother nature is in the process of correcting this problem, without MORE human intervention. Whether these trees are cut or not, shoe string fungus is ever present in the forest floor (everywhere) waiting to take over weakened trees. Further, the problem is that much other hardwood will also be harvested in order to make this Timber Sale profitable and more attractive. The sale (appears) to need to be attractive toward both, the private logging companies (that will be bidding on our forest) and the quotas/tallies for in-state harvested wood (for the paper product industry).

    Chicopee State Park and Chester State Forest were logged during the last two years. The condition they were left in is unacceptable. This logging is being carried out in an irresponsible manner with disregard for wildlife, plant life, land usage, and most of all, the condition in which it is left. We do have pictures, but please go see for yourself.

    Massachusetts presently holds some 285,000 acres of forest throughout the state. With this Timber Sale, the state is attempting to sell 130 acres of our small 852 acre park (approximately 15.26%).

    The Friends of Robinson State Park are in the process of trying to stop this excessive, unnecessary and destructive logging activity. We need all the support we can get. Your support at this meeting would be greatly appreciated. Attend and show your concern.

    Please join us at the Agawam Public Library, Monday evening, May 22nd at 6:30PM.

    Ways you can help:
    • Write your legislators: An easy to use form-letter can be found at www.gravitywarehouse.com
    • Write the Governor and Lt. Governor – Mitt Romney and Kerry Healey
    State House - Office of the Governor – Room 360 – Boston, MA 02133 888-870-7770
    • Write your State Representative - Daniel F Keenan (Resigned) Legislative Aide Running Office
    [email protected] - 375 Walnut Street Extension-Agawam, MA 01001 413-786-4545
    • Write Your State Senator - Stephen J. Buoniconti
    [email protected] - 150-B Bridge Street Springfield, MA 01103 413-733-9991 Fax: 413-733-9998
    • Write the Mayor of Agawam - Richard A. Cohen
    [email protected] 36 Main Street Agawam, MA 01001 413-786-0400 ext. 200
    • Sign the Petition to Stop the Logging
    • Attend this meeting
    • Write to local news outlets with your opion (letters to the Editor)
    • Share this information with others.
    • Post on Community Websites

    Robinson State Park is a small park that many people enjoy in many ways.
    Logging our park will ruin it!!!

    Get involved!!!

    For more information:
    Friends of Robinson State Park (Steve) 786-3744

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    I saw the destruction at Chicoppee State Park...The dang bulldozers followed that great trail that had all those nice berms through the tall pines that reminded me of the ewok forest in Star Wars movie...now it's totally wrecked and un-rideable.

    They also did logging at the Batchelor St trails in Holyoke/Skinner but because NEMBA negotiated with the forest service to preserve the single track...they did minimal damage...they did not follow the single track with their skid roads but just intersected it at various spots.

    I don't think you can stop the logging but you can try to preserve the trails and minimize the impact...contact NEMBA if you haven't already done so.

    www.NEMBA.org

  3. #3
    Steam Donkey
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    Thanks for the response.

    Yes, Chicopee is a total mess and that is one of the areas we are basing our concerns on. Recent forestry done around this area displays irresponsible practices and is unacceptable. Between Chicopee, Chester and Toby, we have some good examples to support our concerns.

    NEMBA has NOT been very helpful on this issue. I would think there would be some serious interest and support. I have forward information and meeting announcements to them and haven't seen anything on the website or even heard that it went out to any distributions. Considering the largest user group in Robinson SP is MTBs (by far), I am very disappointed. I have contacted NEMBA a few times and the response has been minimal and discouraging.

  4. #4

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    robinson logging

    Hello Herr Hare,

    I attended your informational meeting on May 22 regarding the logging and have some thoughts. It strikes me that there may be a real need to thin some of the red pine that might be sickly and dangerous. The problem with the state's plan is it is for too heavy handed and the short and medium term damage to the park will be profound. The state's plan to harvest healthy trees to pay for the red pine "repair" is simply unacceptable. I'm not qualified to have an opinion on the ecological damage that would result, but it's clear from the folks in the know at the meeting that that damage would also be substantial.

    My proposal, if I were allowed a choice, would be to selectively remove the minimal number of red pines necessary that would help new growth take root and grow. It strikes me that that state should be willing to pay for a careful, minimally invasive, very selective cutting that would not ruin the usefulness to the general public for the next 10 or more years. This selective cutting could be spread across several years to minimize it's visual impact. Has an idea like this been considered at any point?

    I was clear from the presence of the logging contractors and their heartfelt but not very persuasive arguments, that there must be some very good money to be made by harvesting the all the hardwood the state has targeted for cutting. The idea that state wood harvesting quotas and good old greed is responsible for the horrific plan the state is sponsoring is, well, sickening. I am going to contact my local reps to see if an official inquiry into the need for such drastic cutting.

    Good luck with the fight and please let me know if there is anything I can do to help.

    Regards,
    Jack

  5. #5

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    logging in Robinson

    If anyone cares to send a letter to their local state reps about this issue, here is a copy of a letter that I've sent if it helps anyone write one of their own. You're also welcome to copy this one in it's entirety.

    Regards,
    Jack

    To your local State rep:

    I’m writing to express my extreme displeasure with the proposed harvesting of lumber at Robinson State Park in Agawam. The State is proposing a major, invasive, and destructive cutting plan that will result in a marked loss of the park’s beauty and usefulness to the citizens that make use of it. It appears that the driving forces behind the State’s plan are pressures to meet quotas for in-state wood harvesting and profit for the State as well as the contractor that is awarded the contract for this harvesting.

    The proposed harvest will cut acres of trees--healthy vibrant hardwood trees--in order to support the cost of removing some red pines that are reported to be sick. The State’s proposed plan will make several frequently used parts of the park essentially unusable for several years and it will take decades for the park’s beauty to be restored. If there are sick trees, the common sense answer should be to remove the trees that are a problem, but only in a way that does not cause such a major impact on the public’s use and enjoyment of the park. There may not be profit or help in meeting harvesting goals in this approach, but with the billions spent on other projects that have little or no effect on our immediate lives, spending a few hundred thousand on careful, minimally intrusive, selective cutting seems a much better way to deal with a problem that does directly bear our the quality of our lives.

    I am not qualified to discuss the environmental aspects of this harvest, but scientists present at an informational meeting spoke volumes about the dangers to animal and plant life as well as to some critical historical and archeological aspects of the park.

    It seems a genuine violation of the public trust to destroy this beautiful environment in the sake of quotas and profit. I urge you to use whatever means you have at your disposal to stop this seemingly wanton destruction of a public park and help find a better solution. The people that use Robinson State Park are relying on you in helping to stop this careless destruction of our local State Park.

  6. #6
    Steam Donkey
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    Jack,
    In my opinion... You are dead on!!! Thanks for your thoughtful response and your letter is great! Steve

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