i10 cargo trailers- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    i10 cargo trailers

    looking at building a tool trailer and know the BOB trailers seem to be the standard...but anyone try out the i10direct version?

    Single Wheel Bicycle Cargo Touring Trailer

    amazon has them for $149
    Riding: '91 Carbon Epic Stumpjumper w/a rack on the back

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    looks like it'd be noisy and somewhat shaky (especially over time) with those bolts as attachment points. is the thing supposed to be collapsible or something? any reason it wasn't welded there instead?

  3. #3
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    I don't own an i10 cargo trailer but I did look at the link provided. I agree with Natehawk that it looks it would be great for hauling groceries on the road but I don't see it holding up to trail duty.

    I used a Bob trailer for an extensive overseas road tour in 2000, and after the tour converted it over to trail duty. It's had only one support in the front similar to this one and it eventually had failure of welds. More recent models all have two supports and the newest ones I have also have an additional piece of support metal.

    I know it is considerably more money but my recommendation is for the full suspension BOB model. The suspension really helps protect the BOB frame itself and it actually is a lot easier to tow since it tracks better instead of bouncing all over the place.

  4. #4
    Off the back...
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    The i10 does look a little light for hauling much more than bread and cabbage. After using the BOB trailers for the last couple of years, I am quite pleased with their ability to carry loads on singletrack. I don't like their tendency to handle poorly when fully loaded. The weight limit on mine is 65 lbs, and going over that makes the bike and trailer unstable. If I need to handle bigger loads, I'll use a two-wheel trailer. I picked up a used chariot-style trailer, stripped off the kid carrier part and bolted on some angle aluminum - Maybe $50 all in. 125+ pounds was no problem, even over rough ground. The downside is that it gets caught in narrow gaps. Small price to pay for not having to walk that stuff in to the build site.

  5. #5
    trail rat
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    I would not trust it for real loads.

    Here is a break down hedger, fuel, blade lube, helmet, gloves, boots, pants, shirt, pack, water, and food, massive u-lock and 15 foot cable for 8 hours of clearing brush. I towed it 15 miles on the pavement, then about 2 miles of dirt road, and a couple hundred yards of single track. Hid it behind a huge bush, locked up, and cleared about 2 miles of trail.



    I doubt the i10 would have lasted the day.

    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  6. #6
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    well then, here's to the BOB trailer, thanks for making that decision a confident one...
    Riding: '91 Carbon Epic Stumpjumper w/a rack on the back

  7. #7
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    BOB FTW...

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