Equestrian Barriers...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Equestrian Barriers...

    One of our Land Managers has asked us to look for some sort of natural barriers designed to encourage horse riders to stay on horse trails and stay off the hiking/biking trails in one of their parks. These would be located where equestrian and hiking/bike trails intersect.

    Does anyone have any experience with this?

    Ken

  2. #2
    sunnyside up
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    narrow opening between posts

    We have a lot of trails protected from horses in our area by two posts set in a short open rail fence, where the posts are wide enough for you to walk your bike and your body through, but too narrow to get a horse through. Usually they put the fence in where there are natural barriers to keep people from going around (slopes, rocks, etc).

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  3. #3
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    I'd say a version of a texas gate, but I know horses smart enough to step carefully and get across.

    I'd agree that posts / bollards with the right spacing / "twist" is the way to go.
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  4. #4
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    A few ideas

    I've seen some horse and motorcycle barriers that consist of a sort of walk through maze with 90 degree turns. The turns are no problem to walk through, and maybe even manuever a bike through, but too tight and short for a horse or motorcycle.

    I've also seen wooden step through barriers that consist of parallel vertical wood posts, 6"x6", combined with a wood cattle guard type arrangement.

    Lastly, I've seen a few different formal fence crossing arrangements.
    The simplest is just a woodent crossbar section in an otherwise barb wire fence. You dismount, lift your bike over, and climb over after it.
    Next in simplicity, but not so bike friendly, is an A frame type crossing, basically an oversize step ladder built over a barb wire fence.
    Lastly, I've seen full blown stairs that straddle the fence. These look something like my barrier pictured above. You climb stairs parallel to the fence to a platform over the fence, then climb back down, again parallel to the fence on the other side.

  5. #5
    featherweight clydesdale
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC
    One of our Land Managers has asked us to look for some sort of natural barriers designed to encourage horse riders to stay on horse trails and stay off the hiking/biking trails in one of their parks.
    Ken
    Natural as in rock or built out of blown down tree material??

    Something that would require the horseback riders to dismount should be effective because climbing on and off the horse is a pain. Some riders can't do it without something to stand on. I think a 30 inch wide by 6 foot tall door frame fabricated out of logs with a 4 foot high timber rail fence (zig zag stacked logs) on either side might work. That wouldn't slow the bikes down at all, and its too narrow/short for a horse rider combo to fit through. Take it down to 28 inches by 5 feet and I doubt a dismounted horse would fit through it. You might measure a horse just in case...

    Whatever you get, post some pics!

  6. #6
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    Gateways

    Here are photos of gateways that show some ideas for filtering certain types of visitors.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
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    More Photos

    More Photos.
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  8. #8
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    More Photos

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  9. #9
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    That is on the McKenzie River Trail. Built more to keep the log stable than as a gateway.
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  10. #10
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    A labyrinth pass-through is the easiest and most effective. As the former owner of an escape-artist trail horse it is about all he could not get through/over/around. Needs to be fairly narrow and tight turns.
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  11. #11
    "I thought you were dead"
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    The most important idea = if you have not already pre-determined the intersection, and still have the ability to select the trail intersection waypoint, go for the choke. Rocks, a tight squeeze, a super narrow thread across a steep cross-slope, a portage.... anything that might deter equestrians without having to buy and build a gate. The problem with a gate is that you'll have to add drift fence to both sides all the way back to a feature such as a really big rock, grove of tight trees, etc.

    Rocks, and many jagged varieties there of, would be the best. Only the best equestrians (and the best horses) know how to lead their steeds through a tight spot. Really good equestrians are far and few, unless you are in the Cordillera. Plus, an inexperienced equestrian would not want to lead her/his multi-thousand dollar living and breathing horse through something we'd drag or carry our multi-thousand dollar bikes across.
    Last edited by barnstormer; 11-14-2006 at 08:17 PM.

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