Chainsaw 101: proper way to plane a log- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Chainsaw 101: proper way to plane a log

    I got the ok to plane a log on one of our trails to turn it into a skinny. What's the best way using a chainsaw? I've seen some logs that looked like they were "X'd" then maybe sliced horizontally with the saw. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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  2. #2
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    Wink

    Chainsaws...

    ...don't like to run on their sides due to loading the chain on the sides of the bar and will overheat unless done slowly. They were designed to run in plane, not to say you can't do it.

    I make skinnys laying on the ground, and cut into it from the top thus making 2 skinnys our of one log, then placing it where I want it, by using the quad or winch or steel bars.

    Now if your dealing with a big tree that can't be moved then try splitting it with wedges then cleaning it up with a chainsaw! Splitting can be difficult with some wood species.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chainsaw 101: proper way to plane a log-copy-hcga-work-11-20-11-001_900x900.jpg  

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  3. #3
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    You should have a ripping chain installed or what you could do is make a series of short cuts fairly evenly spaced and use an axe and knock out the pieces.

  4. #4
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    If you have a pulaski, its perfect for chipping away the waste between vertical cuts.


  5. #5
    Coastal Rider
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    If you plan to a lot of this you may want to invest in a chain saw mill. Here is a link http://www.baileysonline.com/search....kan&catID=1132
    Bailey's has decent prices and you can also find ripping chain and proper tools for splitting. Using a pulaski to clean up the surface may result in bloody legs because of the short handle!
    Be careful and have fun building and riding!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren_ View Post
    If you have a pulaski, its perfect for chipping away the waste between vertical cuts.
    This, and not to criticize but to add.

    i don't think you really need that clean of a cut.

    Smooth surfaces where algae take will provide no grip when wet.

    A finish surface that is cross-hatched will help minimize that.

    The idea to "mill" a log in half is so that you can have 2 skinnies for 1 log.

    Even then if you are going to have a dead flat surface make sure the run up, and exit point are straight on/off the log or you're going to have people complaining when they lose their wheels from underneath them after a few years.

    All skinnies i have made have been hand split with Western Red Cedar, which provides a rough natural split surface. If i were to make one out of a log that doesn't split, i would vertical cut, clean it, then cross hatch at an angle pattern at around 3/4" deep.

    If you are going to mill a log in half they do have chainsaw mills for that. Doing it without, you should exercise caution and patience and a few chainsaw sharpenings, depending on wood and size of feature.
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  7. #7
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    1. Run chalk line at height on both sides of log
    2. Cut down with chainsaw to chalk line every 1-10 inches depending on wood type.
    3. Use hammer/pulaski/adze to knock out pieces
    4. Level as necessary

    - This will give you one piece of flattened log.
    - The surface will have a rough texture that will provide traction.
    - It is easier on your chainsaw.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by justinwp View Post
    1. Run chalk line at height on both sides of log
    2. Cut down with chainsaw to chalk line every 1-10 inches depending on wood type.
    3. Use hammer/pulaski/adze to knock out pieces
    4. Level as necessary

    - This will give you one piece of flattened log.
    - The surface will have a rough texture that will provide traction.
    - It is easier on your chainsaw.
    this is what I was looking for thanks. I don't want it perfectly smooth, a little uneven treadIMO it will add to traction as opposed to a smooth surface. The pics aboive look great. Gonna try and work on it htis week.
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  9. #9
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    I stuck with the "x" and chip method. You definately have to take time. Rides pretty well, very pleased with my first attempt at lumberjacking. Sorry for the blurry pics. Thanks for all the advice.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chainsaw 101: proper way to plane a log-1-mile-log.jpg  

    Chainsaw 101: proper way to plane a log-1-mile-log-w-ramp.jpg  

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