Building " Safe And Sane " Stunts- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Building " Safe And Sane " Stunts

    We are in the middle of building some new trail. Due to our agreement with the land manager we can't build any large "North Shore" type stunts. About 3 foot high is our max.
    I would like to see some of your stunts that might fit into our trail.
    Take a look at a couple of our log rides.http://quimpertrails.org
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  2. #2
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    beautiful craftmanship; nice work!!

  3. #3
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    Wow. Thats Sweet. I Want To Do Something Like That Soon!

  4. #4
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    Check this horse shoe shaped log ride:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBdVp...eature=related
    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    www.IMBA.com
    NY State Trails Council Member

  5. #5
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    The horse shoe shape log ride is great. Hard to ride,but it is not high enough to kill you if you fall off. But it is high enough to mess with your head just a little. I am having two trees cut down at my home this month. I will try to get some pieces of log big enough to make my own horse shoe ride. I might be able to add it on to the log ride in my photo. It is about 1.5 ft tall and 40 foot long.
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  7. #7
    beer thief
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    Here are a few, both wood and stone.
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    imba_pete and radair. That is some good stuff. Thanks for posting the photos.

  9. #9
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    Wrench Monkey
    What is the easiest way to flatten the top of a log like you did in your first photograph? I think my land manager would let us do some log rides like that as long as there is an easier path for beginners to choose. I was thinking of using a chain saw to cut some vertical grooves in the log and then maybe use an adz to level it off.....how did you do that? Also, have you built some sturdy log pyramids? If so, how? We don't always have access to a lot of rock, but we have plenty of timber so I am interested in wooden trail features.

    Thanks

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by roguehoe
    Wrench Monkey
    What is the easiest way to flatten the top of a log like you did in your first photograph? I think my land manager would let us do some log rides like that as long as there is an easier path for beginners to choose. I was thinking of using a chain saw to cut some vertical grooves in the log and then maybe use an adz to level it off.....how did you do that? Also, have you built some sturdy log pyramids? If so, how? We don't always have access to a lot of rock, but we have plenty of timber so I am interested in wooden trail features.

    Thanks
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=327166

    Pyramids

    There are a few ways of doing it. If you have large enough rounds you can really just let them sit by themselves. But if you want to be assured nobody moves em around the easiest way would be to set your pyramid and simply tie them together. If you look at the link to the picture below, on the side i've shaved the side of the logs so i could attach a 2X6. Then i simply screwed it down with some timber screws. If you're worried about a smaller pyramid being lighter you can anchor them by burying a post a foot and a half in the ground, Screw them together using the post, and use some kind of Simpson Tie or fabricate your own metal if you like. You can set up a pyramid post alongside the log pyramid so you can simply screw them to the post along the side.

    The log pyramid hybrid feature pictured here is called Homewrecker. It's a fat cedar base with another half foot round on the backside. There are 6 approaches or 6 ways to ride the log, and more if you're a trials rider.

    http://www.bbtc.org/wiki/index.php?t...arty-small.jpg
    .~...|\
    ...~.|.\
    ..~..|..\
    .~...|...\
    ~....|....\
    ...~.|.....\
    ....~|____\
    _____||_________
    .\....FAILBOAT..../

  11. #11
    Just roll it......
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    Quote Originally Posted by roguehoe
    Wrench Monkey
    What is the easiest way to flatten the top of a log like you did in your first photograph? I think my land manager would let us do some log rides like that as long as there is an easier path for beginners to choose. I was thinking of using a chain saw to cut some vertical grooves in the log and then maybe use an adz to level it off.....how did you do that?
    Thanks
    Roguehoe,

    A couple of techniques we've used. Both involved using a chain saw. The first is the technique you describe which involves doing a bunch of vertical cuts into the log (going approx the same depth and keeping the cuts somewhat horizontal to the ground) and then coming back with an axe, pulaski or adz and chipping it out. This works great because it gives your log texture after it's done, but it's super labor intensive. The 2nd option is to slice a portion of the top of the log with the saw to give you a flat surface. Think of it like slicing a chunk of meat off the top of a ham. This is quicker and less labor intensvie than the first method, but I still recommend coming back afterwards and adding vertical cuts (i.e. crosshatching) into the log to give it more texture/grip. That makes a BIG difference for traction when it's wet and we have to deal with that a bunch in the PNW.

    You'll see a lot of folks use chicken wire or even some kind of grip tape (or shingles) to duplicate this as well, but aesthetically speaking, I'm not a fan of those at all.

    Cheers,
    EB

  12. #12
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    I have flat topped logs both ways. Using an adz is lots of work. It is also harder to get the surface even. The best way we have found is laying the chainsaw flat and just start cutting nice and slow,keeping the saw flat and level. Then put cross cuts in the top of the log for traction. We like to keep our log rides looking nice,so we clean up around the ride when we are done building it. Using the adz makes a ton of wood chips. Using the chainsaw makes a ton of sawdust(no big deal) and a few large flat pieces of wood. The sawdust blows away and blends in with the plants,and the large flat pieces make good a good frisbe. The other way to flat top a log is with a Log Wizard. We have never used one,but they look nice.It is a small planer that fits on the end of a chainsaw bar.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the advice/info. I can get the job done now.

  14. #14
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    Here's a video of a new log-over we built a few weeks ago:

    http://www.stage6.com/user/iannewcastle/video/2030709/

    BTW we'll be building some log rides using the "log wizard" attachment in a few weeks. I'll let you know how it works. I tested it out around my yard and it doesn't work as good as I imagined it would. It's good for skinny logs where you only want a 3-4" flattened surface but for the wide logs. I think I need to modify it a bit so it works better.

    The sideways chain saw method works really well for wide and long cuts.

    You can buy "ripping" chains, which cut faster than the crosscut standard chains, HOWEVER USE CAUTION because they do not have any anti kick back features.
    Make sure you use all the neccessary safety equiptment:

    Kevlar chaps
    Kevlar gloves
    Kevlar vest
    Steel toe boots
    Hard hat combo eye screen and ear protection

    I have also used the cross cut and adze method, which I kind of like for short log rides.
    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    www.IMBA.com
    NY State Trails Council Member

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wrench Monkey
    The best way we have found is laying the chainsaw flat and just start cutting nice and slow,keeping the saw flat and level. Then put cross cuts in the top of the log for traction.
    What also works well is cross hatching BEFORE laying the chain saw flat to cut a riding surface. That way the cross cut pieces fly off in chunks, and you can gauge the depth as you go along pretty easily. Depending on the criss hatch and level cut depth, you may have to cross hatch a bit deeper after the flat cut.

    D

  16. #16
    TNC
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    Wrench Monkey here are some simple wooden features that we built at our trails. We're on city land, so like you we have to be reasonable. However, it was decided that if the more radical stunts were clearly marked with proper warnings and were not on the main trail, then some more "exciting" features could be incorporated.

    The first pic is one of a small jump ramp. It helps riders to gain confidence "getting air" on a ramp and dropping off something bigger than a curb. Some initially look at this and think about getting air on the ramped portion and maybe hitting their rear wheel as they're coming down. The ramp is just high enough and long enough, however, that if you're going fast enough for your rear wheel to hit the end of the ramp before clearing it, your forward momentum carries you on through without any excitement. The only way to screw up on this one is to go so slow that you literally drop off in slow motion and possibly endo. But you have to go at an almost trials pace to do it. This has been a very good yet safe skills builder for many riders.

    The second one is a small, flat launch ramp over a dry creek with a very nice transition. You can go slow or fast as the transition is long and smooth. We have several places where we incorporated some wooden and natural features together just to keep it fun.
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  17. #17
    TNC
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    Here are a couple of pics of a more challenging stunt that is off the main trail. It is clearly marked and signed. There is no way to accidently ride onto this stunt and claim that it wasn't clear that it was dangerous...LOL!

    The ramp is about 4' off the ground and goes to a skinny which leads to a 10-14 foot drop...depending on how far out you go...to a very nice transition. Obviously not many people try this one. We have about 3 jumps and stunts of this caliber that are warning marked and off the main trail.
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  18. #18
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    Those look very well built. What is the wording on the warning signs? Any close ups?
    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    www.IMBA.com
    NY State Trails Council Member

  19. #19
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    The one above the stop sign says, "Baron''s Suicide Ramp". Baron is the guy who built it. The one with yellow letters says, "Dangerous Jump...Ramp has deep dropoff...Look before you leap...Only for skilled riders.

  20. #20
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    Thanx!

    You can't say they weren't warned..."Baron's suicide ramp"

    gotta love it!
    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    www.IMBA.com
    NY State Trails Council Member

  21. #21
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    Those are great stunts.Thanks for posting them.
    I like your signs. Hard to miss a big red stop sign.

  22. #22
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    I've posted this in the video section before...

    http://www.revver.com/video/517174/helmet-cam-work/

    ***I can't seem to keep the ad from showing up at the bottom but if you click the x it will go away and nothing bad will happen***

    But it shows a few of our logs...most around here are 3-4" wide, some skinner and some fatter and the heights are all over the map but tend to stay below 2 to 3 feet.

    The second log on vid is what we call the Virginia Creeper; it requires an FWO (Front Wheel Only) to enter the next down hill log.

    Here is a vid of us making the Virgina Creeper…funny we filmed the hardest log to flatten…it usually never takes that much effort, but shows our method

    http://pics.bikerag.com/showphoto.ph...500&ppuser=139

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wrench Monkey
    We are in the middle of building some new trail. Due to our agreement with the land manager we can't build any large "North Shore" type stunts. About 3 foot high is our max.
    I would like to see some of your stunts that might fit into our trail.
    Take a look at a couple of our log rides.http://quimpertrails.org
    Nice work. you guys have some real solid builds there. everything looks challenging and fun but nothing that a land manager will be upset with. I bookmarked your page and plan on poaching a few of your ideas!

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