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  1. #1
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Board roll call?

    Thought it might be fun to find out a bit more about who reads this forum, and the group you work with. I get staggered by the size of some of the organizations and projects you guys mention!

    I'll go first - I helped found the Fat Tire Trail Riders in Spokane last year. Mainly, because I get a lot of satisfaction from trail work, and wanted to do more. Our area doesn't really have any major issues, even the trail care crew has commented on that:
    http://www.imba.com/tcc/2005/spokane_wa.html

    So, we don't have "issues" hanging over our heads that incite people to action. One thing we are working on that is going really well is getting a city park property developed for riding. This property is unrecognized as a park, and used heavily by mountain bikers exclusively. I've posted recently about what we've been doing up there.

    Our group is really small. We've got 30 member, but some of those are from last year and we are trying to get everyone to renew. We've got a public email interest list of about 100. Our 501 is literally pending... we hope to hear back from the IRS any day now. There is a small core group of 4-8 of us that actually do things, from trail work to trying to write grants and so on. As the president, I alternate between borderline burnout and passion. So we are trying to figure out the best ways to grow the group.

    Later this week we build our first "legal" ladder.

    ~formica
    www.fttrc.org

  2. #2

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    Mountainbikers hardly care about "saving the trails". All they can do is compromise their position selfishly to get to ride what they want. It is a poor approach.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    Mountainbikers hardly care about "saving the trails". All they can do is compromise their position selfishly to get to ride what they want. It is a poor approach.
    I have wondered if the name of this forum should be changed, but have enough fights to pick.


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    CORP Madison, WI

    Walt Dizzy and I are co-managers of the trails at Blue Mound State Park. We've done the IMBA trail school and FISTA Chain Saw course required by the state park. CORP is a WORBA chapter and WORBA is the Wisconsin IMBA affiliated group.

    Blue Mound has about 5 miles of what we call ski trail (wide and groomed by machine in winter), maybe 11 miles and growing of single track now, and a master plan for 18+ miles of single track. Blue Mound also has an area designated for expert (trials, jump, freeride) riding. It's in the "driftless" (no glaciers) part of the state and the park has more rocks and vertical than any other riding area around.

    Our club is also making what we believe is the state's first legal freeride area in a city park (Quarry Ridge Park) and we maintain 4 other trail riding areas in the county. Club members and volunteers also have access to a secret riding area on private land and get discounts at most area bike shops.

  5. #5
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    We have 2 bike clubs in our area. One is the Lacawanna and the other is Hubbard. Hubbard is dealing with Merli-Sarnoski. Merli was built by the LBC but is now being timbered by the county comissioners. We at Hubbard are doing everything we can to stop it.
    The Lacawanna state park though is doing good. One of the LBC members (Joe Teirney) had signed an agreement with the former park official, before he left, to continue building trails. Joe follows IMBA's book and has been a member for quite a while now. Last year we "rock armored" a section of trail about 100' long that was always muddy. The new park supervisor (Alex) has been working with us. The park keeps getting the local land owners to give abutting land to the conservancy projects. Last year, we put in a nice switchback. We built a rock wall and fill it in with dirt from above. This spring the LBC and some locals from Hubbard and abroad finished off the trail and added another. The LBC now has 25 or so miles of trails. The trails are put up for adoption as they are built. I've now been with IMBA for 6 years. LarryFahn
    Last edited by LarryFahn; 05-15-2006 at 06:31 AM.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFahn
    Hey damonomad, remember this?
    Remember what?

  7. #7
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    ...so much for trying to have a somewhat intelligent conversation around here...

  8. #8
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    Have a better suggestion?

    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    It is a poor approach.
    It is easy to criticise. Do you have any suggestions for a better way?
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  9. #9
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    Hello from Durham Region

    I've been active for the past two years in the Durham Region area in the Toronto area of Ontario, Canada. There is definitely a need for a strong grass roots club here, because we don't have one, just local "riding buddies" in groups of 5-10. So after looking for one for two years, and not fiding one*, I decided to start one. The Durham Mountain Bicycling Association (DMBA for short).

    We are small. We have a core of 5, 6 paying members on top of that, and an extended umbrella of 100+ interested riders. This is our first season, so we're happy with the results so far. We'll see how the season goes.

    We've made contact with the local land manager and associated land owners and are making good progress. This is mostly because the land owners and manager want to engage with us. One of our members started a for profit trail building business and the land manager wants to hire them for some work.

    At present there is a huge amount of apathy with local riders. I'm not sure yet why this is the case. I'm hoping that when the core group of us starts to get things accomplished that the apathetic crowd takes notice. Of course I'm also going to undertake more active approaches to raising awareness of not only the club, but the need for a club, and the value of a club.

    I'm heading to Whistler and hope to ride and talk with a lot of people to get as many ideas as I can.

    *Actually I did find one club, but to say they are low key is an understatement. They are also not actively looking for members, nor are they active in advocacy and trail issues. Basically they are just a larger, better organized group of "riding buddies." Which is fine, but not what I felt was needed.
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  10. #10
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    Mountainbikers hardly care about "saving the trails". All they can do is compromise their position selfishly to get to ride what they want. It is a poor approach.
    bullshyte. You obviously do NOT work in the field of advocacy and (trail) propogation, preservation, and future development. There are amazing projects going on right now, but your natural proclivity towards pessimism prevents you from seeing this reality. More terrain is being 'opened' this year than is being closed....wake up and smell the power of a growing and influencial political base. I am reporting from Teton Valley, Idaho, where more trails are being maintained, created, and preserved for Mt. Bike use than will ever be closed, and that is a FACT. Please quit your sardonic quipping, it is useless, futile, and disingenuous. (sp?)
    And what have YOU done, personally, Damon, to rectify your perception of Mt. Biker apathy? I assume NOTHING, and I am sure that I am correct. (you sound an awful lot like Frank Booth, BTW)
    Thank you.
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

    Thrill Bikers Unite!

  11. #11
    JmZ
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    Greets,

    I'm JmZ.

    Currently the President of NIMBA (Northern Indiana Mountain Bike Association), and the Northern Representative of HMBA (The Hoosier Mountain Bike Association).

    I've been involved with trail projects for over a decade now. I can thank Mike from the old usenet newsgroups for inspiration to become involved and make a difference.

    We've got a working relationship with several property managers in our area, and we actively maintain one of the trails. We are also currently pursing new opportunities.

    Further south in the state within the past several years there have been four significant (in size and importance) trails opened from Indianapolis and further south. One of those trails - Brown County State Park right by Nashville Indiana (about 30 mins to 1 hour south of Indy depending on where you start from) received a RTP grant for $150,000 to build 10 additional miles of trail in the park. Within 5 years the park will have gone from 0 miles of mountain bike trails to over 20.

    JmZ


    Quote Originally Posted by formica
    Thought it might be fun to find out a bit more about who reads this forum, and the group you work with. I get staggered by the size of some of the organizations and projects you guys mention!

    I'll go first - I helped found the Fat Tire Trail Riders in Spokane last year. Mainly, because I get a lot of satisfaction from trail work, and wanted to do more. Our area doesn't really have any major issues, even the trail care crew has commented on that:
    http://www.imba.com/tcc/2005/spokane_wa.html

    So, we don't have "issues" hanging over our heads that incite people to action. One thing we are working on that is going really well is getting a city park property developed for riding. This property is unrecognized as a park, and used heavily by mountain bikers exclusively. I've posted recently about what we've been doing up there.

    Our group is really small. We've got 30 member, but some of those are from last year and we are trying to get everyone to renew. We've got a public email interest list of about 100. Our 501 is literally pending... we hope to hear back from the IRS any day now. There is a small core group of 4-8 of us that actually do things, from trail work to trying to write grants and so on. As the president, I alternate between borderline burnout and passion. So we are trying to figure out the best ways to grow the group.

    Later this week we build our first "legal" ladder.

    ~formica
    www.fttrc.org
    JmZ

    From one flat land to another.

    Advocate as if your ride depends on it...

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmurray
    It is easy to criticise. Do you have any suggestions for a better way?
    Hell yea I do. Fight for FULL trail access just like hikers get. Bikes DON'T cause more damage than hikers, they cause less. Stop compromising from the beginning of the opponents platform.... and that is to eliminate bikes from being ridden on the dirt.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit
    bullshyte. You obviously do NOT work in the field of advocacy and (trail) propogation, preservation, and future development. There are amazing projects going on right now, but your natural proclivity towards pessimism prevents you from seeing this reality. More terrain is being 'opened' this year than is being closed....wake up and smell the power of a growing and influencial political base. I am reporting from Teton Valley, Idaho, where more trails are being maintained, created, and preserved for Mt. Bike use than will ever be closed, and that is a FACT. Please quit your sardonic quipping, it is useless, futile, and disingenuous. (sp?)
    And what have YOU done, personally, Damon, to rectify your perception of Mt. Biker apathy? I assume NOTHING, and I am sure that I am correct. (you sound an awful lot like Frank Booth, BTW)
    Thank you.
    I don't really care. I wouldn't "work" with any of that ridiculous crap. The compromises bikers have already made due to "work" like you have fallen in love with disgusts me.

    You are brain washed. I would never expect you to understand.

  14. #14
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    An excellent start

    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    Hell yea I do. Fight for FULL trail access just like hikers get. Bikes DON'T cause more damage than hikers, they cause less. Stop compromising from the beginning of the opponents platform.... and that is to eliminate bikes from being ridden on the dirt.
    Departing from this idea... How does a poorly organized, relatively (relative to hikers) new group of trail users challenge the power of numerous existing well organized, rich, long time trail users? I'm being serious here, not patronising. This is a power game with many other long established, more powerful, and well funded players. Unless we (mountain bikers) approach it as such we won't make progress in the fashion that you are suggesting. So we have to take a back-door approach. Progress is admittedly slower.

    If you have any ideas on how to mobilize the greater body of mountain bikers in order to get them politically motivated, and willing to donate significant money ($20 membership is not significant), I'd like to hear them.

    As much as MTBers want to "just ride" and not "play politics" this (unfortunately) is the way the world is. If we don't get politically active our areas to "just ride" in will dwindle to none. But this is a scare tactic and most people don't respond well to this approach. In my area this is a munciple election year. I'm planning on putting out list of questions that mountain bikers can ask their prospective councillors about cycling and trail issues. If anyone has any suggestions here I'd appreciate it.
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  15. #15
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    Concerned Long Island Mountain Bikers (CLIMB) was started in 1990 and we have about 500 members. We have designed, built and currently maintain over 80 miles of trails across the island and are now branching out into Queens... we helped get new trails approved for NYC which will be adopted by a new club that has recently formed (NYCMTB).

    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    IMBA NY Rep
    www.IMBA.org
    www.NYCMTB.org

  16. #16
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    Nice thread. Staying on topic...

    I started doing trail work with SORBA when I lived in Atlanta. When I moved to Charlottesville, VA I saw a need for a local club that sorta did the same thing as SORBA. I got together with several other riders, and we founded Charlottesville Area Mountain Bike Club or CAMBC (www.cambc.org) in 2003.

    We currently have about 60 members and an email list that serves about 200 people in the community. The amount of trail work performed has gone from approximately 140 hours per year prior to officially forming a club (2003) to over 500 hours just in the first half of 2006. Organization and communication is key to making this sort of thing happen.

    I headed up trail work at Walnut Creek for the past several years. I recently passed the ball to another member in order to focus more on creating additional riding venues in our area.

  17. #17
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    great topic.

    I enjoyed reading about all the activity. Long time reader of this board. I'm involved with a group of guys in Northern Wisconsin building single track in the Nicolet National Forest. I'm finding out our project and group is unique. First, we're not a club, just a bunch of guys who want single track nearby. We have the backing and support of the local business association. I live in Southern Wisconsin, the trail is in Northern Wisconsin. We have a small cabin nearby. Many of the volunteers and trail users are in the same situation. this results in most of the work being done informally, and not on organized work days. The result of this has been an advantage. With many opinions, routes have been constantly -but subtley, tweaked BEFORE being built, with the finished product 99% of the time being the best option for the terrain. Also, the Forest Service gave us a huge area to work with. the trail covers a lot distance and ground, with the varied terrain that goes with it.

    The project got started by writing a letter to the Forest Service and asking them if we could build a trail. They replied and asked to meet us. The meeting went great, and the Forest Servcie said, "we want this to happen." I keep telling the Forest Service this is such a success story and thanking them. They've given us, basically, permission to do everything we've asked. We've even floated the idea of stunts for the future and they did not rule it out. Our goal is 11 miles of brand new single track. We are a few miles short of finishing. There will be a few miles of existing two track to tie it all together. plus the Forest service wants to link it to several miles of old two track to enable a bike ride between two campgrounds. If that happens, I believe epic rides will result.

    In addition to dedicated locals, we've had local rails/trail club help out (who were stunned, when they saw what we ride, but they continue to help). We've had Scouts do Eagle projects on the trail (there is training, via imba site, book and demonstrations). The Scouts have done fantastic work. I have found it interesting how much the Forest Service is aware to what we've been doing. From meetings, discussions, emails..it is clear they check out the trail often, which is good, when we have questions. As they will often know right away what we are referring to.. They even sent a guy to an Imba work shop.

    It is a lot of effort being 3 hours away from the trail. I do find myself bouncing between burnout and passion too. An odd thing to me, but maybe all of you get this too... but my perception has been that, because we are not a club and not on the radar of Worba, (Wis Imba affiliate), people question our "qualifications" to build a path in the woods. That gets the goat of a few of our volunteers when, rather than being excited about new riding opportunities, someone would rather nitpick we don't have a club patch. From reading this board, I believe we've been to the same Imba workshops as many of you, use the same tools, have prior experience, have the same goals,...etc.... oh well....

    My biggest surprise have been posts by bitflogger and dizzy, being so close to Madison I figured you guys would have loads of volunteers. Our project is so remote, I get frustrated at times by some turnouts, but I see we often get the same number as you. Someday we will meet and I'd love to discuss this further. Could use the support group.

    this past Saturday, my wife was helping build single track at the soutern kettles. 33 people turned out, wow! They got tons of work done in just a few hours.

    Charlie

  18. #18
    beer thief
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    Howdy - I really need to stop in here more often.

    I am on the board of directors of the New England Mountain Bike Association (NEMBA; nothing to do with any man-boy associations) and am the current president of the White Mtn (NH) chapter. While NEMBA has nearly 4,000 members, our chapter is quite small, with about 35 members.

    We are fortunate to live in a community that supports outdoor recreation. We've done a pile of work in the White Mtn National Forest, local state parks, and on Nature Conservancy and town-owned lands. After our first major new trail project on town conservation land, I was invited to become a member of the town's conservation commission. A further bonus is our town manager is an avid MTBer and now a NEMBA member. This has opened up more projects, and we've built two significant bridges and a technical trail on town land. They love us - no other recreational group comes close to doing the trail work we do, not to mention thousands in grant funding obtained.

    How about some color?
    1. Local log ride in the making
    2. Our most recent bridge project - this was the centerfold for the town's annual report.
    3. We've built about 450 ft. of bog bridges in the Nat'l Forest.
    4. 50' steel bridge under erection.
    5. The finished steel bridge in high water, with my son hanging over the side.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #19
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    Hi,
    Hope (need) to be spending more time in this forum now also.

    I'm in the state of Hawaii, Island of Maui and we are finally making some progress with forming an entity to focus solely on trail riding and dirt jumping issues and projects.

    I've got a long story to tell about the history here but it's going to have to wait.

    We have a very small rider population, but lots of tourists and I think interest is building from both. We are also isolated from the other islands so it is very hard for all the islands to work together.

    The state land managers have shifted their focus recently towards solutions to the motorized problem, and they have been working with NOHVAC. We were trying to cooperate with their efforts but have realized that it's going nowhere. Part of the long story that I'll have to get into more later.

    to be continued...
    Eric

  20. #20
    outdoor miner
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica
    Thought it might be fun to find out a bit more about who reads this forum, and the group you work with. I get staggered by the size of some of the organizations and projects you guys mention!
    I better introduce myself if I'm going to post looking for advice https://forums.mtbr.com/images/smilies/tongue.gif

    I'm a team of 1. I've got a blank canvas and friendly landowners (me and a couple of neighbors). The only thing holding me back is time.

    My project is to build a few miles of singletrack to navigate my own place and maybe link with a few of the neighbor's farm tracks.
    Experience is like a comb that life gives you when you are bald

  21. #21
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    Greetings from New Jersey

    Greetings fellow Bikers;

    Were to begin..Ok my MTBR name is NMBPmike, But my real Name is Michael Flatley
    (ok yeah lord of the dance, its more like Lord of the Crash). I am one of the IMBA National Mountain Bike Patrol Instructors and also the NMBP North East Regional Rep.
    I Sit on the Board for a Advocacy group called JORBA (Jersey Off Road Bicycle Assoc)
    as the rep for the (MCPS) Monmouth county Park system, and I am one of three Master volunteers, and the Trail crew trainer and Leader for MCPS. also I am JORBA's Trail Patrol Coordinator. JORBA is highly noted for creating the Pay Dirt Program and we are an IMBA member club. We have over 12 chapter affiliates with over 200 members that cover the entire NJ state, and last year we gave over 2500 total hours of volunteer time. Each Club is doing some amazing work in their areas.
    New Jersey has i believe some of the most beaurocratic Bull S**t
    i have ever experienced in my 15 years of MTB advocacy and yes it does take years to try and educate, inform, and be able to make land managers understand that all user groups can coexist and trails can be maintained with the proper tools, Training, and dedication.
    I would say over the last 4 years their has been major changes in the attitudes of the users groups to come together and unit to help keep our trails open, who would have thought that MT bikers, and Hikers and Equestrians could work together for a common goal it is finally happing in New Jersey.
    In closing id like to say support your Local bicycle Shop and your Local MTB advocacy group, they are the ones out their volunteering their time to help keep trails sustained and open.

    Thanks,

    NMBPmike

    (Michael Flatley)
    NMBPMIke

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