Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177

    What tool kit to buy?

    Looking to get a tool kit for learning to work on my mountain bikes at home and save trips to the bike shop. Anybody got any recommendations for a good kit? I've looked at some on performancebike and jensonusa, but was wondering if there are better options out there that I'm missing. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Dirt Bound
    Reputation: Joe_Re's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    237
    I don't like tool kits. Too many time I see tools in them that are not applicable to one bike or another. If you have bikes from the mid 90s to current, you will likely get use out of every tool in a given kit. Otherwise you often end up with certain tools that do nothing for you.

    What bike(s) are you looking to service, how in depth do you want to go and what are the kits you're looking at?

  3. #3
    Dirt Bound
    Reputation: Joe_Re's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    237
    Sorry, I know that wasn't an answer to the question you asked, but it is the conclusion my experience has led me to.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,448
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  5. #5
    Class Clown
    Reputation: dundundata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,384
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    that'll do it

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe_Re View Post
    Sorry, I know that wasn't an answer to the question you asked, but it is the conclusion my experience has led me to.
    Looking to be able to eventually learn to do any repair or replace any part on my Salsa Timberjack or any other mountain bike I may have in the future. Maybe possibly build my own bike from the frame up one of these days.

    The kit I'm currently looking hard at is the feedback sports team edition tool kit from performance bike. I could easily also go to harbor freight and buy all the common metric tools that I need and don't already have. If I did that, what are all the special tools I would need? FWIW, my oldest mountain bike is a GT XCR 5000 from Y2k. My newest bike is the 2018 Timberjack.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Nah, that one looks kinda cheap. I'd rather spend a little extra and get a good set of tools. Hahaha. Just kidding of course. I don't got the bank account for something like that.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sfgiantsfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2,065
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    haha! dick
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  9. #9
    Class Clown
    Reputation: dundundata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,384
    I say buy a decent set of allen wrenches and go from there. Different parts will require specific tools. We have many topics discussing the must have tools for basic maintenance.

    example of recent one: http://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/what...d-1061748.html

    Not too impressed with that feedback kit, for the price buy their pro elite stand instead

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,448
    ^ Agreed, you can't go wrong with allen keys. Bondhus is a great value brand. Bondhus 12592 is great.
    I also really like the "Y" wrenches like these
    http://www.worldwidecyclery.com/prod...SABEgL0K_D_BwE.

    +2 on skip the kit and buy tools as you need them
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    462
    To get you started, a decent set of metric hex wrenches, chain whip or Pedros vise whip, cassette lock ring removal tool, crank puller, bottom bracket tools specific to the bikes you have, pedal wrench, #25 torx bit if you have 6-bolt calipers and a chain tool.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    210
    Silca ratchet, torque tube and the proper bits is an excellent tool kit. I have over 1,000 tools in my box and one day I was working on my car and could not get a fastener off. I remembered the Silca kit and success in 30 seconds.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: splash13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    32
    Spin Doctor Essential Tool Kit from Performance Bike. Cheap but gets the job done.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by splash13 View Post
    Spin Doctor Essential Tool Kit from Performance Bike. Cheap but gets the job done.
    Listen to this post. Good enough to get started and add to as needed. There's a bigger Spin Doctor set, also.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    927
    I have a ton of tools because I have always done all my vehicle, toy maintenance. I have a rollaway Snap-on tool box that's full with metric and SAE stuff from big to small. But years ago I got one of those $50 'bike specific' tool kits in the little 1'X1' plastic case. I use it all the time...slides under seat in my truck so everything I need is with me for just about any repairs/mntc. There's lots of specialized little tools that are included in these kits. Get one...you won't regret it.

    https://www.bikenashbar.com/Product2...s%20&%20Frames

    Also, invest in a torque wrench and allen sockets and refer to mfg torque values.
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    5,092
    Lot's of variables between what you have, what you know and what you need. If you have and know little, a tool kit is likely good. If you already have a significant assortment of tools, and know what you like and need, getting individuals might be better. One issue I see with kits in fitted cases is there's usually no room for additional tools, and different tools of the same type might not fit.
    Do the math.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177
    I already have a metric Allen set, plenty of metric sockets, torq bits and drivers, screw drivers, etc. Any kind of "normal" tool I need I probably already have. I have a good bit of tools assembled from years working on my own truck, mower, and dirt bike. I really just need the specialty bike specific stuff like tools to service the chain, bottom bracket, cassette, headset, and shifters/brakes. The specialty tools are what I need, and I'm not even sure exactly what all I need for the headset, bottom bracket, and the cassette/driver body.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177
    Forgot to mention I'm getting a workstand as well, so if anyone has a recommendation for one of those I'd also appreciate it. I have no experience whatsoever with workstands, so all I've got to go with is reviews on the online retailers. Got about $500 of my family's tax return to work with for stand and tool kit, but I'd like to not use all of it on those two things if possible.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,448
    Feedback sports is a fairly popular brand of bike stand for the home mechanic. I've had mine for about 15 years from when it was a different company. While it's been great with todays huge carbon tubing I'd like to find better jaws for it.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  20. #20
    Dirt Bound
    Reputation: Joe_Re's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    237
    That's a tough nut to crack. To become shop independent will put you well north of $500.00, but I'm guessing you know that. The specialty tools are the ones that will cost you.

    As a mechanic who owns his own tools I have seen the costs associated with buying tools which will work day in and day out. Nothing like an auto mechanic, but I'm about $6-7k into it (at retail) and I could double that easy. That being said, I need to be able to work on lots of different brands with all their different parts and "standards". I also bought top shelf tools cause I need them to work so I can.

    A piece of unsolicited advice. If you go to a shop, and have them help you identify the correct tools for the parts specific to your bike, please buy them through said shop.

    So, start with a good quality stand. You will have it forever and it will work with near any bike at all. I've used a bunch of different models from Park, Feedback and some other cheapies. I really like my Feedback Pro-elite. The head is super easy to use and has given me years of trouble free service. But it wasn't cheap.

    Buy good quality torque tools.

    If you wish to service your brakes, I like the Finish Line kits. I will say if you have mineral oil brakes, get the brake manufacturers oil. It's cheap enough and you should only need to do it every few years. If it's DOT fluid, do it every year, make sure it's the right number or compatible and it doesn't matter who's name is on it.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177
    Thanks for all the advice guys. I think I'll start off with a feedback pro elite workstand and just buy tools individually as I need them. I might try to see if the local performance store has the $50 essential kit. If the tools look of good quality, I may get one of those. If not, I'll just buy the tools as I need them. Is a chain whip all that is needed to get a cassette of and a new one on? Just asking because my first chores will probably be brake and drive chain upgrades as long as I don't yard sale bad and break something else.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    210
    You need a whip and a cassette tool to engage the cassette. Easy and fast. I change cassettes depending on where I am riding. As far as buying tools one at a time, it is always more economical to buy in sets. Your will need a chain break, a chain tool for releasing the links, spoke tool, accurate air gauge, and all,the common hexes and stars. T handles work well. Always check your fasteners, especially when returning from a brutal ride. Having the proper tool is always important but especially with bikes cause many of the fasteners are not hardened and are small requiring correct torquing. Some of the components are expensive and over tightening on carbon can get expensive. If you own a bike and ride it regularly, a well equipt tool box is almost a requirement, if just for maintance and checking tightness.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    927
    to get cassette off you need the special 'star' socket. Those are in the $50 kit I mentioned above as well as pullers for various bottom brackets, chain whip, etc.

    I never owned a stand...I just strategically rigged up a few large hooks and eyebolts to the floor joists in my basement and suspend bike. That's worked fine for me for 20+ years. Most stands are way too short for tall geek like me (6'4"). I have things set up so bike is at a comfortable level, well supported and very easy to work on.
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    210
    I never used a stand for decades. My bad. There work great and you can rotate the bike for cleaning, replace components and maintance. And they are portable so use at trail head is priceless. Buy a good one and never buy another.

  25. #25
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,584
    Yes, get a quality work stand.

    For years I worked without one. I viewed the work stand as a luxury item. It's not.

    It's a tool and a necessary tool to get the job done correctly and efficiently.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177
    Definitely getting a good stand. It'll either be the feedback pro elite or the topeak copy cat from Performance.

    Moving on, can anyone recommend a good torque wrench? The one conventional tool I don't already have is a 1/4" drive torque wrench, so I'll need to get one of those as well.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3,393
    Steep and Cheap has Park Tool Flat-Faced Sockets on sale for $7.55. a necessary tool for fork work. They also have "Pedro's vice whip" which is fan-dam-tastic, on sale.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    177
    Picked up a Park Tool workstand and a bunch of various Park Tools yesterday locally. I decided to get it all local for the convenience factor in case anything needed to be returned. Got just about all the tools I need to do most of the maintenance on my Salsa. Still need to get the Park 3/8" drive external bottom bracket tool and a good chain break tool. They didn't have the bottom bracket tool and good HD chain break tool I wanted at the local store. Put the workstand together last night and I think it'll work just fine. It's nothing fancy, just the PCS-10 home mechanic stand.

    What tool kit to buy?-img_3600.jpg

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    210
    I think ya done good. Years ago I relied heavily on my LBS but their hours were short and closed on Sundays so I bought tools and a stand, similar to what you did. Saved money over the long haul but that was not my objective. Turns out the best result of educating yourself and have he necessary tools is your ability to make repairs on the trail, dozens of miles from a car. Then there is the ability to help others you encounter broke down. Very important to have a good torque wrench for home. I use Silica’s new torque tube on the trail. With carbon, accurate torque wrench is critical. There is a uTube video where a carbon fiber expert and repairer talks about all the crushed frames and handlebars he sees. Almost all damaged by over tightening fasteners. Safe Travels!

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    108

  31. #31
    Class Clown
    Reputation: dundundata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,384
    Really makes me question carbon fiber with how careful you need to be with it.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,191
    I started with a multi-tool and, as I decided to do more and more of my own work bought the tools I needed as I went along. When I started installing my own forks, for example, I bought a crown race puller.

    Now I have a pretty decent set of tools and I can do almost everything...haven't had the urge to service suspension forks or rear shocks (because I only have one of each) on all of my bikes which are mostly rigid but short of that and esoteric things like facing bottom bracket shells and straightening frames I'm pretty much set.

    Next expansion area: Wheel Building (although I have always looked at wheel building as something like loading your own ammo. A worthwhile pursuit but I'm not sure if the investment in time and equipment will be worth it)

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    7,980
    ^ interesting analogy. I build wheels and reload ammo! Both have paid for themselves very quickly. My first press paid for itself before finishing off the box of bullets. My wheel building tools paid for themselves after a few sets of wheels, but that wasn't long either.

    You don't have to go nuts with tools for either hobby. I mean you can, but theres no real need. For wheel building, all you really need is a spoke wrench to get started.

    I bought a spin doctor 4-5-6 Y tool. Its got a really comfortable padded handle, and the hex tools fit well.

    I also bought a park 2-2.5-3 Y tool, and it kind of sucks balls! Its hard plastic with a cheap seam, and the hex sections are long and flex like crazy. I usually make due with tools, but I think I might replace this with another spin doctor. Its really that bad.

    My park tension meter works well enough and ive been using it for years... but the cheap hard plastic handle cracked and fell off some time ago. The other options are astronomically priced, so ill probably tape it up and keep using it.

  34. #34
    Class Clown
    Reputation: dundundata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,384
    Spin dr. Stand, park tensionmeter, xtools dishing tool all cost me about $150. Throw in a spoke wrench and become the wheelmaster

  35. #35
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,584
    The link that you provided is just Tool Boxes, not Tool Sets.

    Are looking at tool boxes or sets?
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-26-2012, 05:01 AM
  2. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-08-2012, 07:23 PM
  3. Park Tool Kit or any tool kit
    By aldeezy in forum Tooltime
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-28-2011, 07:48 PM
  4. Giant Tool Shed Multi-Tool - Ten Bucks - incl. chain tool
    By aa240sx in forum Where are the Best Deals?
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-23-2011, 11:17 AM
  5. Building my first bike, what tool kit should I buy?
    By roc865 in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-11-2011, 02:55 AM

Members who have read this thread: 25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.