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Thread: Torque wrench.

  1. #1
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    Torque wrench.

    Looking for an adjustable torque wrench to adapt to the different torque values on my full suspension mtb. Anywhere from carbon handlebar mounts to suspension pivots. Any recommendations? Thx

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    The Spin Doctor Torque wrench set is pretty popular, but be aware that sometimes that line of Chinese import wrenches has some degree of calibration error. Before you start cranking those low-torque bolts down, I would seriously consider getting it calibrated.

    Note that the other names that that same Chinese wrench is sold under, including BikeHand and Venzo, can be found on Amazon for quite a bit less money.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...que+Wrench+Set
    Last edited by Cuyuna; 10-28-2017 at 04:06 PM.

  4. #4
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    I have several big torque wrenches and my used an old Craftsman 3/8 in/lb wrench for the last 15 years. It's a made in the USA version.
    I picked up on of the one of the CDI dial gauge ones and love it. I also used it to check my craftsman and it was perfect thru the whole range.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...e?ie=UTF8&th=1
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  5. #5
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    You will probably need two wrenches to cover the range of torque needed to cover all fasteners on a bike. For small bolts such as stems this is the tool to get if you don't want to spend a lot on a real wrench.

    https://www.protorquetools.com/2-8-n...rench-tla28nm/

    For the higher torques if you want to save money get a beam style wrench or for more money get a CDI click type wrench. The CDI metal wrenches are better made and calibrated with certification documents.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1lawnman View Post
    Looking for an adjustable torque wrench to adapt to the different torque values on my full suspension mtb. Anywhere from carbon handlebar mounts to suspension pivots. Any recommendations? Thx
    If you gots the money for sure a Snap-on. For carbon parts make sure its the small 1/4" one that adjusts in Inch/pounds increments, not foot/pound.

    On the other end of the spectrum from snap-on are the Harborfrieght ones. At the bottom of this page is a coupon for $11.99, if you wait they go for as low as $9.99. These are good enough for bike repair but my old eyes can't see the numbers on it because they are stamped so shallow. Thinking of getting one of the Bikehands ones because they look easier to read.

    For crankset bolts you may also need a 3/8 torque wrench.

  7. #7
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    For bike use, flat beam style torque wrenches are the go. The mechanism means that they are very consistent. Assuming that the markings were right to begin with, and its easy to check, they will stay that way unless you do something really dumb.

    Honestly wipe them down with lanotec when you get them and they will serve you reliably forever.

    Parktool use to have the Tw-1 and tw-2 but discontinued them in favour of clicking ones. Dicks.

    Expect to pay $50 for cheapies on Amazon. Or $100-$150 for a japanese Tohnichi, also on Amazon.

    The adjustable spring loaded ones can be highly variable. They are either very reliable and good from the get go or out by a lot and tend to wander with temp age etc.

    You should also budget to get two wrenches. A small one for carbon parts that does say 3-20 Nm and a bigger one for cranks etc.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shortyesquire View Post
    For bike use, flat beam style torque wrenches are the go. The mechanism means that they are very consistent. Assuming that the markings were right to begin with, and its easy to check, they will stay that way unless you do something really dumb.

    Honestly wipe them down with lanotec when you get them and they will serve you reliably forever.

    Parktool use to have the Tw-1 and tw-2 but discontinued them in favour of clicking ones. Dicks.

    Expect to pay $50 for cheapies on Amazon. Or $100-$150 for a japanese Tohnichi, also on Amazon.

    The adjustable spring loaded ones can be highly variable. They are either very reliable and good from the get go or out by a lot and tend to wander with temp age etc.

    You should also budget to get two wrenches. A small one for carbon parts that does say 3-20 Nm and a bigger one for cranks etc.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    I use this beam style one for high torque crank bolts (which are up around 50Nm).

    Craftsman Beam Torque Wrench (00932999) - Socket Sets - Ace Hardware

    I have a 5Nm preset CDI one that serves me well for clamping handlebars and seatposts.

  9. #9
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    Perhaps there are pros and cons for both types of torque wrenches. Only you can define what is best for you and your needs.

    As a personal observation in a career involving professional wrenching across many disciplines (aerospace, aviation, automotive, manufacturing etc.), it's an overwhelming choice of professionals to use 'click' type torque wrenches. There are some solid reasons for selection of this type, but only you can decide what is best for you.
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    Iíve scoured eBay for Sturtevant beam torque wrenches- Iíve got a few now- but also picked up a Craftsman digital adjustment clicker for cranks and thru axles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    The Spin Doctor Torque wrench set is pretty popular, but be aware that sometimes that line of Chinese import wrenches has some degree of calibration error. Before you start cranking those low-torque bolts down, I would seriously consider getting it calibrated.

    Note that the other names that that same Chinese wrench is sold under, including BikeHand and Venzo, can be found on Amazon for quite a bit less money.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...que+Wrench+Set
    I got the above "Venzo" branded one on Amazon. I set it at 2Nm (lowest marking), but the dial spins lower. I tried it on the stem on my old alloy hardtail which was already tightened and it kept tightening with significant force and the wrench did not click. Tried dialling it back below 2Nm and same thing.

    Is my wrench miscalibrated?

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    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    I got the above "Venzo" branded one on Amazon. I set it at 2Nm (lowest marking), but the dial spins lower. I tried it on the stem on my old alloy hardtail which was already tightened and it kept tightening with significant force and the wrench did not click. Tried dialling it back below 2Nm and same thing.

    Is my wrench miscalibrated?
    Yes.

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    I got the above "Venzo" branded one on Amazon. I set it at 2Nm (lowest marking), but the dial spins lower. I tried it on the stem on my old alloy hardtail which was already tightened and it kept tightening with significant force and the wrench did not click. Tried dialling it back below 2Nm and same thing.

    Is my wrench miscalibrated?
    Likely. There is no shortage of info on the web for testing accuracy of a torque wrench.

    I have a buddy that bought the BikeHand version off Amazon. He returned two of them for significant miscalibration. I think that the cheaper torque wrenches are a crap shoot. The margin for error is low at lower torque settings, like tightening carbon fiber components. I have an old Craftsman that was moderately expensive. Itís remained dead-on accurate for years. I do test it every now and then.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    Likely. There is no shortage of info on the web for testing accuracy of a torque wrench.

    I have a buddy that bought the BikeHand version off Amazon. He returned two of them for significant miscalibration. I think that the cheaper torque wrenches are a crap shoot. The margin for error is low at lower torque settings, like tightening carbon fiber components. I have an old Craftsman that was moderately expensive. Itís remained dead-on accurate for years. I do test it every now and then.

    SILLY, SILLY question. I will doublecheck when home, but is the below the correct position of the lever for the torque mechanism to click or the middle position? Or did I just lockout the wrench? This was the default position out of the box.
    Torque wrench.-wrench1.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    SILLY, SILLY question. I will doublecheck when home, but is the below the correct position of the lever for the torque mechanism to click or the middle position? Or did I just lockout the wrench? This was the default position out of the box.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Likely just sets the direction of the ratchet.

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  16. #16
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    Yes, it's direction, but I've never seen one that wasn't marked.
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  17. #17
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    never loosen fasteners with that spring torque wrench, use a regular wrench

    always unload it to zero when done using it
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  18. #18
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    Top tip if you're torque wrench shopping: if you're buying a clicky torque wrench with a vernier scale, choose one that's optimised for your favourite units or the scaling will be crazy. Your favourite units for MTB fettling should be Nm, anything else is just wilfully wrong. Here's a dual-scale clicky torque wrench optimised for foot-pounds:

    Name:  Torque-Wrenche scale.jpg
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    The pic also confirms 127.0.0.1's wind-it-back-when-you're-done best practice - this helps keep the calibration good for longer by not subjecting the spring to long periods of stress.
    Hose me down till the water runs clear.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grassington View Post
    .....choose one that's optimised for your favourite units or the scaling will be crazy.
    Indeed, but you know what? These two wrenches:

    Capri Tools 31200 20-150-Inch Pound Industrial Torque Wrench, 1/4" Drive, Matte Chrome

    and

    Capri Tools 31201 10-80 Foot Pound Industrial Torque Wrench, 3/8" Drive, Matte Chrome

    ... at just over $100CAD each from Amazon were otherwise so perfect for my use that I ended up converting the list of all my torques to inch-pound and foot pounds. Using the N-m scale was so frustrating like you said They are calibrated in BOTH directions, unusual to find, especially at that price, and include the calibration test sheets.

    Prior to that I used one of the small 3-13 N-m wrenches and a larger Park Tool beam wrench. The problem with a beam wrench is while one is sweating a larger torque it is a pain to stretch ones neck to the side to position the eyes for a straight on view of the scale Life is so good now simply waiting for that satisfying click.

    Cheers!
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexalex View Post
    I am not a mechanic, just a weekend car enthusiast. I'm also looking for torchue wrench. It should be for general automotive use, such as wheel nuts, suspension, and perhaps the occasional engine use. I was fortunate to find some informative post here http://mechanicguides.com/best-torque-wrenches/ . Still, it needs to be a good and accurate wrench. And hopefully not too expensive.
    Look up the torque specs for the wheels of the cars you'll be using it on. Typical torque specs for lug nuts can run from 80-125 ft-lbs. Note that your typical home wrench that maxes at 120 ft-lbs won't be usable below 20 ft-lbs (27 N-M), so you'd need a different wrench to cover the lower range suitable for bicycle work.

    Bear in mind that if you put a wheel on and torque the lug nuts down, you'd better re-torque it about 100 miles later. That's especially true even after getting tire work done at your local tire place. Many/most of them have the world's most beat-up torque wrenches or torque-sticks...that is...if they even make an attempt to torque your wheels. Usually they just spin the suckers down with an impact wrench and call it good.

    A few years ago, I had a wheel shear off the lugs on a single axle boat trailer due to poorly maintained and mis-torqued lug nuts. That was an extremely inconvenient experience.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    That was an extremely inconvenient experience.
    So eloquently stated.
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