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  1. #1
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    My quest for a functional all-in-one easy to use multi-tool.

    My quest for a functional all-in-one easy to use multi-tool.-screenshot_20170909-203224.jpg

    Ratchet action, forward, reverse, locked. 2.5mm, 3mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm allen keys, T15, T25. That 5mm long allen key is going to be replaced soon with a ball end 2" allen from McMaster Carr so I can get into that tight bolt on the front bottom of the seatpost adjuster.

    It is a tad heavy at 138g, but the ratchet action is well worth the penalty to me. I had all those bits in my tool chest, but if you need to pick out what suits you and your bike, each bit can be had for a few bucks at the most. The bits that I've got in this tool fit the fasteners on my Trek nearly 100%. The cap for my brake fluid is a T10 I think, and the cranks and pedals need a big tool, but I think this has me very well covered. Chime in if there is something that I'm missing other than a tire lever (which I've never met a tire that I needed one for).

    My quest for a functional all-in-one easy to use multi-tool.-20170909_204810.jpg

    It's got my Trek fuel covered very nicely anyway. I thought I'd share the idea.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails My quest for a functional all-in-one easy to use multi-tool.-20170909_202854.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Home depot?

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonlui View Post
    Home depot?

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    Yep $15.

  4. #4
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    The hard part is finding metric allen bits. Home depot had none, but luckily I have a compilation of about 90 sets of 1/4" driver bits over the last 30 years and I had some.

  5. #5
    BOOM goes the dynamite!
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    Crank Brothers M19. Often found around $20. Quest over.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Crank Brothers M19. Often found around $20. Quest over.
    Sorry brah, this has that smoked. Ratchet 10x better than folder allen keys.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    Sorry brah, this has that smoked. Ratchet 10x better than folder allen keys.
    To each his own but I'd much rather carry a conventional multi-tool with folding allen keys because you can get much more leverage on them. I could care less about a ratchet feature that might save a second or 2 on a tool that gets used once in a blue moon.

    Glad it works great for you though.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  8. #8
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    I'd agree - not enough leverage, no 8mm, and not long enough. And no chain tool. I can think of several things I've had to fix on a ride that I wouldn't have been able to do with that.
    Most recent was a loose road bike brifter - the normal folding Allen key was barely long enough. You would never have enough leverage to loosen or tighten the 6mm hex that positions the seat on the post.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    To each his own but I'd much rather carry a conventional multi-tool with folding allen keys because you can get much more leverage on them. I could care less about a ratchet feature that might save a second or 2 on a tool that gets used once in a blue moon.

    Glad it works great for you though.
    Leverage is what strips shit out. That little screw driver has enough leverage to strip everthing out except the T25, 5mm, and 6mm allen hardware holes. And it has more than enough leverage to meet the torque spec on every fastener 5mm and under. So why would you need more leverage? I would much rather have the convenience of the ratcheting action than a clumsy folding allen key set.

  10. #10
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    There isn't an 8mm on my bike other than maybe the crank bolt, and that isn't something that I expect to touch on a trail ride.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slash5 View Post
    I'd agree - not enough leverage, no 8mm, and not long enough. And no chain tool. I can think of several things I've had to fix on a ride that I wouldn't have been able to do with that.
    Most recent was a loose road bike brifter - the normal folding Allen key was barely long enough. You would never have enough leverage to loosen or tighten the 6mm hex that positions the seat on the post.
    Chain tool not needed with sram 1x12 and my seat post is held by 5mm. 9 N*m max torque. That's about 6.5ft*lbs. If you can't hit 8 or 9 ft*lbs with a screwdriver, you might oughta trade in your man card.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    Leverage is what strips shit out.
    Leverage doesn't strip shit out, over-torquing and poor fitting wrenches do. Leverage does comes in pretty handy when removing an old cleat bolt. Like I said, to each his own but it's not for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    There isn't an 8mm on my bike other than maybe the crank bolt, and that isn't something that I expect to touch on a trail ride.
    I never expect to touch any bolt on my bike during a trail ride but if I do it could just as easily be my 8mm crank bolt as anything
    I brake for stinkbugs

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    Chain tool not needed with sram 1x12

    Are those chains unbreakable?
    I brake for stinkbugs

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    If you can't hit 8 or 9 ft*lbs with a screwdriver, you might oughta trade in your man card.
    I'm a little limp-wristed, so I need the leverage of a normal multi-tool hex key.
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  15. #15
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    ^sorry it doesn't work out for every single person and every single bike guys, but it works perfect for the vast majority of fasteners on my Trek Fuel ex 8, and it's 10x better than a folding allen key set that costs more money, weighs more, is slower, and provides enough extra leverage to strip out a bunch of aluminum threaded holes that really don't need a lot of torque.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    ^sorry it doesn't work out for every single person and every single bike guys, but it works perfect for the vast majority of fasteners on my Trek Fuel ex 8, and it's 10x better than a folding allen key set that costs more money, weighs more, is slower, and provides enough extra leverage to strip out a bunch of aluminum threaded holes that really don't need a lot of torque.
    Honestly I think it's great that you found something that works for you and that you're happy enough about it to share it but why add the bs? I highly doubt that thing is lighter and cheaper than my $12 Park that has more tools on board, which I have never stripped a bolt with...
    I brake for stinkbugs

  17. #17
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    It's awesome when you find a solution that works for you, and I'm sure there are a few others that read this and like it as much as you do, but that tool doesn't work for me.

    I need my multi tool to fold flat because it has to fit in a specific place in my little seat bag- so it doesn't rattle agains the Co2, or wear a hole in my tube.
    ...or it fits in a specific spot in my Camelbak...so it doesn't rattle and bounce.
    I'm also not a fan of loose hex bits. All I need is to drop one in the dirt trying to swap sizes and be SoL when it's dark, I'm sweaty, my brain is hypoxic from climbing, and I'm frustrated by a poorly performing bike.

    I'm not hatin' on this, just you know... "different strokes for different folks".
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  18. #18
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    This thread is too funny now.

    I think everyone covered most of the reasons experienced riders would shy away from this. Actually, the only time I use bits is when I'm changing rotors with the cordless drill (removal only to save time). The one I'm currently using is twisted since it's made from some kind of soft/crappy metal. At least I know I'll be at home when it finally breaks.

    Good luck.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    Chain tool not needed with sram
    Ride dude has never wrenched a few chain links beyond service life.


    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    Leverage is what strips shit out.
    Leverage doesn't strip anything, inexperience and over-torquing strips shit.

    Ride dude has all the answers for everyone, regardless of that they prefer.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Ride dude has never wrenched a few chain links beyond service life.




    Leverage doesn't strip anything, inexperience and over-torquing strips shit.

    Ride dude has all the answers for everyone, regardless of that they prefer.
    No need to shit up my thread with your hatred. This was my solution for my bike, and it works great. I don't happen to carry around a tig welder for frame repair either, but if you do, and feel you need to, fine, that's good for you. For people who don't need to mend chains or over torque small fasteners, I'm pretty sure my compilation will work really well.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    It's awesome when you find a solution that works for you, and I'm sure there are a few others that read this and like it as much as you do, but that tool doesn't work for me.

    I need my multi tool to fold flat because it has to fit in a specific place in my little seat bag- so it doesn't rattle agains the Co2, or wear a hole in my tube.
    ...or it fits in a specific spot in my Camelbak...so it doesn't rattle and bounce.
    I'm also not a fan of loose hex bits. All I need is to drop one in the dirt trying to swap sizes and be SoL when it's dark, I'm sweaty, my brain is hypoxic from climbing, and I'm frustrated by a poorly performing bike.

    I'm not hatin' on this, just you know... "different strokes for different folks".
    Yeah I'm pretty sure I didnt state it as " right for everyone" either. It's cool if you need a 6mm allen for high torque, my driver won't adequately torque a 6mm. But if someone has a bike like mine, nearly every bolt can be adequately adjusted with this simple, light, cheap and quick tool.

    Also, those hex bits aren't loose. Their is an o-ring inside that tensions them in place pretty securely. You have to work to push them out. They won't fall out.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    No need to shit up my thread with your hatred. T
    No one is shiting your thread, nor is there any hatred.

    These statements are yours, and you're basically saying that your system has everyone else trumped. It's all subject and people find what works for them. You're the one shitting on others way of doing things.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by @Ride@ View Post
    Also, those hex bits aren't loose.
    I don't think you know what loose means in this instance - they're separate/individual pieces and not part of one unit, aka, loose. When you change from one bit to another while outside, Murphy's Law dictates that at least one will fall down a gopher hole.

    Also, tire levers are great for the odd time when a fellow rider can't get his/her tire off and all they brought was a Red Bull.

    Good luck.

  24. #24
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    I used to carry my Swiss multi tool with ratchet & bits. Ratchet is nice and convenient, plenty leverage as its like a micro wrench. I've since switched to Oneup EDC. The ratchet and bits are great, I use them at home and travelling to assemble bike in garage. But on the trail bits can be a liability. When you're heart is pumping hard from riding, its raining, and/or its cold out, its way too easy to drop a bit. I've done it more than once, and once it was in grass never to be found again. Even tried searching with magnet, no luck. Luckily riding with buddy who also carries tools, otherwise would be SOL.

  25. #25
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    Yeah, it's not that the bits are loose in the driver, it's that they're loose as in "not attached" to the tool, so they can be lost easily.

    I can't tell you how many sets of drill bits and screwdriver bits I've bought over the years that ended up missing pieces.
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  26. #26
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    The tool kit that comes with the specialized zee cage is pretty good. Has all i need minus a chain tool and its only 60g.

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  27. #27
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    For me the CrankBrothers M19 does the trick, the only complaint is the protection that is metal and rubs again the tools. It would be much better if they put it inside a nice fabric protection.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVjloeiwRRM

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlavioSilva View Post
    Fthe only complaint is the protection that is metal and rubs again the tools. It would be much better if they put it inside a nice fabric protection.
    Uh...what?
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  29. #29
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    So I've had the chance to use this for the last 2 months and I'm gonna say it's badass. It's a sweet tool set and it does all the stuff I need. Seat adjust, caliper and lever adjust, grip adjust. So far it's been perfect for simple fitment adjustment on tbe trail.

    I carry 2.5mm, 3mm, 4mm, 5mm long ball end, 6mm, and T25 tips. Perfect for Trek Fuel.

  30. #30
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    I carry so many little tools, patches, tubes, pump, extra tools etc., you guys would laugh. But I shall not be caught unprepared!

  31. #31
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    I carry a pump that straps to the bike frame and a patch kit too. Nothing for chain right now though.

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    That cool you found something that works for you. For me though, I definitely want something I can really torque on if needed. 6mm bolts used on pivots can use pretty high torque (I think my last bike had some at 13nm) and the sliding dropouts in my Honzo need some high torque as well.
    As far as never needing an 8mm, I've used mine at least once on my crank bolt and In the last year I've lent my multi-tool out a few time to friends needing an 8mm.
    Also if you're riding anywhere you can't walk out of a chain tool (and a spare link) is a good idea. The few times that I've seen chains break on rides it was never at the quick link. Unless you have a tool to remove the broken section of chain you're SOL.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dexter-01 View Post
    That cool you found something that works for you. For me though, I definitely want something I can really torque on if needed. 6mm bolts used on pivots can use pretty high torque (I think my last bike had some at 13nm) and the sliding dropouts in my Honzo need some high torque as well.
    As far as never needing an 8mm, I've used mine at least once on my crank bolt and In the last year I've lent my multi-tool out a few time to friends needing an 8mm.
    Also if you're riding anywhere you can't walk out of a chain tool (and a spare link) is a good idea. The few times that I've seen chains break on rides it was never at the quick link. Unless you have a tool to remove the broken section of chain you're SOL.
    The 6mm isn't for building the bike or torquing any fasteners, it's for trail emergencies. I have a full compliment of tools that I build my bike with.

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