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  1. #1
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    Manual machine for very different wheel sizes

    So I have a 29in MTB and I am currently building up a 20in BMX. Will one manual machine handle practicing manuals for both these wheel sizes or will I need to be build two?

  2. #2
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    "Manual machine"?
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    "Manual machine"?
    This type thing. https://sandiegomountainbikeskills.c...anual-machine/

    Something to practice manuals on

  4. #4
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    Oh.

    We just use the driveway. It's worked fine for generations and fits any wheel size.
    Plus you learn instinctually what to do when you inevitably loop out, rather than plant it onto your ass.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93EXCivic View Post
    So I have a 29in MTB and I am currently building up a 20in BMX. Will one manual machine handle practicing manuals for both these wheel sizes or will I need to be build two?

    Do you have one now or are you going to build one? As long as the braces that the wheel slots into clears your frame it should work fine. I think you could easily build one that would work for both.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Oh.

    We just use the driveway. It's worked fine for generations and fits any wheel size.
    Plus you learn instinctually what to do when you inevitably loop out, rather than plant it onto your ass.
    I mean I am planning on doing that too but it gives me something to do on rainy days.

  7. #7
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    Trackstands and rear wheel hops would teach you more, without the kluge/goof factor.

    If a contraption is a must, you'd be far better off making a triple set of training wheels with one on each side and one in the back to keep you from flipping. Harder to use without anyone seeing you though, so there's a major downside.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Trackstands and rear wheel hops would teach you more, without the kluge/goof factor.

    Good stuff but they wouldn't teach you to manual. I can see the validity of a manual machine, it's a weird position to put yourself in, unnatural for most people and getting comfortable with it without consequences seems like it would be helpful. Anyway I doubt it could hurt.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Anyway I doubt it could hurt.
    No, won't hurt; I don't see it doing much good either, but hey, whatever floats people's boats.

    I wonder if they have plans for the Step 2 machine that teaches you how to loop out safely - some sort of body harness you run through a pulley system hung from a tree or the rafters that stops you just before you break your ass in half hitting the ground.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    No, won't hurt; I don't see it doing much good either, but hey, whatever floats people's boats.

    I wonder if they have plans for the Step 2 machine that teaches you how to loop out safely - some sort of body harness you run through a pulley system hung from a tree or the rafters that stops you just before you break your ass in half hitting the ground.
    You're going to learn that one way or another, with or without the machine. One could even argue the machine would make learning it safer. You know where the balance point is and it's not an utter shock the first few times you blow through it.

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  11. #11
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    Blake from GBMN just did a video on building a manual machine -




    *****

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    You're going to learn that one way or another, with or without the machine. One could even argue the machine would make learning it safer. You know where the balance point is and it's not an utter shock the first few times you blow through it.

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    Be a lot easier to just ask a friend to hold your front wheel for a minute to get past that IMHO. Or put your front wheel up on one of a zillion objects and hold your rear brake. If someone can't manage to through those first few babysteps without building some contraption, I'm going to go out on a limb and say hanging manuals is petty unlikely to be in their future.

    Whatever, people have a tendency to like overcomplicating simple stuff and oversimplifying complicated stuff. As mentioned, not gonna hurt anything. I still think the training wheels would work way, way better.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Be a lot easier to just ask a friend to hold your front wheel for a minute to get past that IMHO. Or put your front wheel up on one of a zillion objects and hold your rear brake. If someone can't manage to through those first few babysteps without building some contraption, I'm going to go out on a limb and say hanging manuals is petty unlikely to be in their future.

    Whatever, people have a tendency to like overcomplicating simple stuff and oversimplifying complicated stuff. As mentioned, not gonna hurt anything. I still think the training wheels would work way, way better.
    The training wheels is actually a great idea. I think for people without diverse athletic backgrounds linking that balance point as a static position vs where it is in the movement of throwing the manual may not necessarily click. That's not to say they can't eventually learn it though.

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Be a lot easier to just ask a friend to hold your front wheel for a minute to get past that IMHO. Or put your front wheel up on one of a zillion objects and hold your rear brake.
    mtb skills trainers do hold students bikes in the right position so they can get the feel for it and I'm sure a lot of them use manual machines too. A manual machine is better because it teaches the right way to raise the wheel and also how to move your weight around to maintain it. I saw a vid awhile back where some woman (manual beginner) tried one and was getting good technique in less than a minute, no way could she have done that otherwise.

    Anyway it's dumb to debate this, the op wanted to know how/if one could be used for both wheel sizes, not whether or not anyone thought they were a good idea or not. I looked at a few and to me it looks like it would be pretty easy to put some sort of vertical block behind the wheel to move it forward for the smaller wheel. It could be easily removable. That or just make another one, looks like it wouldn't cost much time or money.
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  15. #15
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    I'm surprised they don't buckle your back wheel?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by scar View Post
    Blake from GBMN just did a video on building a manual machine -




    *****
    I watched that video a couple of days ago and seen others, think it's a great way to practice.
    Think if you built one for 29'er you'd be able to stick the bmx in there with wooden spacers on both sides of the tire to make up the tire-width difference. Worth a shot if you're building one anyway. Good luck.
    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

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