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  1. #1
    fc
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    Let's see all your bike tools.

    Main toolbox? Car kit? Long ride set?

    Post your garage setup too if you're up for it.

    Any extinct tools outdated by standards? What tool do you use the most? What are you most proud of?
    IPA will save America

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    Ok, no one is taking the bait, so I try and kick start this. This could be a good thread that I think many here would enjoy.

    I have a taco wagon for my primary tool collection and few roll-arounds for specialty tools (motorcycle, bicycle, aircraft, automotive, carpentry/wood working, etc.) but I found that wasn't working well for most of my bike tools. Over the years I found myself grabbing handfuls of miscellaneous bike applicable tools for road, travel, trailhead and helping friends. While this worked ok, it wasn't really ideal. So finally, I decided to have a dedicated bike tool box that could travel but also accommodate most tools needed for just about any bike related repair or maintenance.

    I ended up building a moderately large, heavy duty travel box that was well organized and complete, but quickly realized it was too big and heavy for a practical travel box. So, I pulled all tools out, laid them out on the shop floor and took careful inventory of what I really wanted and how I could consolidate them to fit into a much smaller box that would accommodate my needs. Compact and complete was my predominate criteria.

    Below is what I ended up with. Surprisingly, I ended up an inexpensive $10 Wally World tool box that perfectly accommodated most everything that I needed to perform almost all service and repair tasks that I normally need. There's a lot of tools buried here that can't be seen, but those are the tools that aren't need regularly or too often. Some can't tolerate having tools buried and difficult to find, but given this box is a multi-function travel box, I'm ok with that. My previous BIG box made everything easily available, but I compromised function over size.

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20180728_191431.jpg Let's see all your bike tools.-20180728_191953.jpg

    Most used tool would unquestionably be Hex Wrenches (Allen wrench). These are one tool that one should not compromise on. You can acquire a high quality set for not too much. Splurge on these.

    I'm not sure how to answer the tool that I'm most proud of, but some of my favorites are a pair of high quality torque wrenches (1/4" & 3/8"), A solid bottom bracket tool, dental spoons for gently extracting bearing seals, Fork tools, this Oury gripped 1/4" socket driver and last, but not least, this wonderful hanger alignment tool from Abby Tools.

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20160912_184838.jpg

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20170319_131240.jpg Let's see all your bike tools.-20180210_103208.jpg

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20171114_192717.jpg Let's see all your bike tools.-20180429_161932.jpg

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20171026_214221.jpg Let's see all your bike tools.-20180224_143018.jpg
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  3. #3
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    Well, this is the long trip kit, the little first aid bag came in the mail right after we moved.


    Then the tools


    And the box of parts

  4. #4
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    Here are my allen drivers

    Fello, pb swiss and Bondhus

    Mtb related mess


    Home made stand. Base unscrews and rack can be screwed the a fixed plate at the ceiling of garage. So it hangs from the top.



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    Hey Eugenenine,

    You located in central Ohio? Just asking because of the Mount Carmel bag.

    Quote Originally Posted by eugenenine View Post
    Well, this is the long trip kit, the little first aid bag came in the mail right after we moved.


    Then the tools


    And the box of parts

  6. #6
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    This is the only one I have right now.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamenstall View Post
    Hey Eugenenine,

    You located in central Ohio? Just asking because of the Mount Carmel bag.
    Polaris/Lewis Center area. I'm right beside the big Chase building and 5-10 minutes from Alum Creek.

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    I've only been riding for about a year now, but I've always been the type to tinker and DIY as much as I can learn to do, so it didn't take long to start building up a decent set of tools. In the days of my cheap REI hardtail, all my tools fit into a small cardboard box, and shuffled between my garage and vehicle as needed. That obviously didn't work too well as things expanded. Ended up with a small-to-mid sized tool box cheapie from Lowes that has been serving well. Small enough to be hauled around in my vehicle for every ride, but big enough to hold damn near anything I would ever need aside from the bike stand and maybe the Park Tool DAG (worth its weight in gold.)

    These shots are actually pretty old and quite a bit more has been added/replaced since, but even as pictured most bases were covered.

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20170820_160233.jpg

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20171115_2138572.jpg

    Thinking about changing things up a bit though for longer road trips. Getting to where the tool count is high enough, and the spare parts count is growing, and the two categories might need to be split up into separate containers.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    That seal-driver tool might be the most useful thing I've ever bought. Just did a lower leg service on my fox34 and couldn't imagine even trying to seat the new wiper seals without it.

    Didn't end up buying the other two tools though. The old trick of just keeping the nuts threaded on 3-4 turns and using them to drive the shafts out seemed to work as well on Fox as it did on my Rockshox fork.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thoreau View Post
    Didn't end up buying the other two tools though. The old trick of just keeping the nuts threaded on 3-4 turns and using them to drive the shafts out seemed to work as well on Fox as it did on my Rockshox fork.
    For years, I did this too. Until a few years ago when the aluminum rebound shaft decided to slightly thread strip from an overzealous whack. I was able to run a die over it and return its function. One day, I found these on sale and took the plunge. They are nice, but certainly not necessary. The seal driver is also nice, but not necessary. I just drove some new Fox seals for a friend with my old PVC fabricated driver with no issues as I have been hearing others are having.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    For years, I did this too. Until a few years ago when the aluminum rebound shaft decided to slightly thread strip from an overzealous whack. I was able to run a die over it and return its function. One day, I found these on sale and took the plunge. They are nice, but certainly not necessary. The seal driver is also nice, but not necessary. I just drove some new Fox seals for a friend with my old PVC fabricated driver with no issues as I have been hearing others are having.
    Price, and not knowing for sure which sizes fit my particular fork, were why i skipped them. Im a whore for having the right tool for the job though and would jump on them on sale too.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Main toolbox? Car kit? Long ride set?

    Post your garage setup too if you're up for it.

    Any extinct tools outdated by standards? What tool do you use the most? What are you most proud of?
    Ok Francois, let's see your contribution!
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  13. #13
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    Come on FC, you're the OP and you started this thread. And, as such, we would like to see your tools.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  14. #14
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    This topic shows many of my bicycle tools.

    Hands down, the tool I use most is my Topeak The Alien 20 function folding tool.
    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

  15. #15
    vbm
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    cleared2land- I am intrigued by your dental spoon. I see they come in different sizes, 1.5-3mm, maybe more. What size have you found best for seal removal? I imagine that works much better than the sharp dental pick I've been using.

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    I had three of these, but lost my smallest one a few years back. I love these small specialty type tools. They work far better than a pick. I invert them and they easily slip under the bearing seal and lift the seal damage free.

    I'm not sure of the sizes as you've asked, but I use the smaller one for smaller bearings the larger for larger bearing seal. I try and pick the one that has a radius close to that of the seal.

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20170318_161928.jpg Let's see all your bike tools.-20170713_204739.jpg Let's see all your bike tools.-20170831_165522.jpg
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  17. #17
    vbm
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    thanks for those extra pictures, I'll order a couple different sizes. As far as the original thread topic goes, here is my first Park tool I ever bought, the 4-5-6 Y-wrench. IIRC from the late 80's. I also took a picture with my BB spanner, which I have not seen in anyone's pictures so far. That BB type is long dead I guess. (I still have my 90's Bianchi that has this BB)

    Old Park tools by madridvb, on Flickr

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I had three of these, but lost my smallest one a few years back. I love these small specialty type tools. They work far better than a pick. I invert them and they easily slip under the bearing seal and lift the seal damage free.

    I'm not sure of the sizes as you've asked, but I use the smaller one for smaller bearings the larger for larger bearing seal. I try and pick the one that has a radius close to that of the seal.
    Anyone with links to these ( Amazon? ) would be appreciated. Hoping not $50 ... I haven't really killed any seals with my picks but these look nicer.

  19. #19
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    Goggle 'Dental Spoons' and I bet that you'll come up with something close.
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  20. #20
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    Let's see all your bike tools.-20181010_224520.jpg
    Let's see all your bike tools.-20181010_225934.jpg
    Let's see all your bike tools.-20181010_224620.jpgLet's see all your bike tools.-20181010_224811.jpgLet's see all your bike tools.-20181010_225036.jpgLet's see all your bike tools.-20181010_224536.jpg
    Let's see all your bike tools.-20181010_224544.jpgLet's see all your bike tools.-20181010_230518.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Let's see all your bike tools.-20181010_224446.jpg  

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20181010_230312.jpg  

    Trek Fuel EX 9.8
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  21. #21
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    A little Slime you keep on hand there?

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    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I had three of these, but lost my smallest one a few years back. I love these small specialty type tools. They work far better than a pick. I invert them and they easily slip under the bearing seal and lift the seal damage free.

    I'm not sure of the sizes as you've asked, but I use the smaller one for smaller bearings the larger for larger bearing seal. I try and pick the one that has a radius close to that of the seal.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    CTL; not to derail the thread, but could you give a brief tutorial on how you do a periodic service on bearings? I need to service the pivot bearings on my SC 5010v2. Thanks much.

    Edit: CTL, please disregard. Found an earlier post where you explain the procedure
    Last edited by ltspd1; 10-31-2018 at 04:00 PM. Reason: Mistake

  23. #23
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    A little Slime you keep on hand there?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
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    Yes, for customers, not myself. I prefer tubeless.

    Started a mobile operation.

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20181009_092428.jpg
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I like this tool so much I just went out to my shop and made one.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  25. #25
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    ^^^ Let's see it! Post a photo.
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  26. #26
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    I bought an old dental pick/ tweezers lot on ebay and this is a 20+ year old USA made cuticle tool. I used a railroad tie anvil and hammer to get the general shape and files/sandpaper for the final finish.
    The other end comes to a point and has a ticker rounded shape for lifting the seal out after you get it started with this side.

    Let's see all your bike tools.-20181101_085629.jpgLet's see all your bike tools.-20181101_085556.jpg
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  27. #27
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    WOW! That looks great. Enjoy.
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    Ok I'll play

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Main toolbox? Car kit? Long ride set?

    Post your garage setup too if you're up for it....
    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0709.jpg
    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0706.jpg
    Most all my tools for my main bikes are in this box.

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    ...
    Any extinct tools outdated by standards? ...
    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0708.jpg
    People complain about changing BB standards but back in the Square tapered BB days I needed a different BB tools (a pin spanner is missing in pic) everytime i switched BB brands for just for one bike. At least raceface made use of the spline tool.

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    ... What tool do you use the most? ..
    Don't really know, allen keys?

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    ...What are you most proud of?
    Maybe the homebrews:
    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0701.jpg
    Blind bearing puller

    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0705.jpg
    3d printed BB tool, did not feel like buying a second Park BBT-29 to install a threaded PF30 BB

    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0704.jpg
    Shock body and shaft clamps

    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0703.jpg
    Bearing and headset presses

    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0702.jpg
    Seal seaters.

    Left out the pics are all the sockets I made chamferless and cornerless for Fox, Zokie, and RS fork service.

  29. #29
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    Homebrew, improvised tools can often be as good as some marketed specialty tools if proper caution, patience and common mechanical common sense is exercised.

    I always enjoying seeing folks devised tools. I remember the early days of using bolt anchors for blind pullers.
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    Nice tip on the dental spoons!

    I use diy bolt/washer bearing press too...can anyone explain why a $200+ press is worth it?

  31. #31
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    Bolt/washer press can be OK as long as bearings press in with good axial alignment and don't cock in the bores. A proper bearing press helps ensure this whereas bolts and washers may not, but not all commercial presses are equal in this respect.
    Do the math.

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    Quote Originally Posted by squeakymcgillicuddy View Post

    can anyone explain why a $200+ press is worth it?
    I can't speak for anyone other than myself, but generally speaking, I see the cost of higher-end specialty tools as a time/value trade-off. If you perform enough of the repetitive tasks that tool was designed for, then you can possibly expect improved efficiency, ergonomics and often design enhanced performance.

    But there is often that emotional/disposable income connection. I can afford it, appreciate it and want it. There’s no reasonable argument for this one.
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    When I purchased my 12T shop press it was for a specific project.

    This ended up being a surprisingly handy tool that I have used lots, for many projects.
    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

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    ^^^ Having a 12 ton shop press can be nice and I wouldn't mind having one.

    But, I have to ask, where do you need or use a 12 ton hydraulic press on bike parts?
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    The Ratt reply showed custom presses made using bolts and pipe.

    The shop press does the same thing.

    It is also really handy to flatten or bend or shape parts.
    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingless View Post
    The Ratt reply showed custom presses made using bolts and pipe.

    The shop press does the same thing.

    It is also really handy to flatten or bend or shape parts.
    Yeah, but they don't use a 12 ton press. In fact, they don't use any type of hydraulic press. Those are using threaded rod and a maybe a hammer.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Goggle 'Dental Spoons' and I bet that you'll come up with something close.
    Found some "lab spatula" tools on Ebay for cheap - but overseas:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Stainless-S...NIg:rk:16:pf:0
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  38. #38
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    Here is my "homemade" star nut tool. Only work with some forks, but for a couple bucks from Home Depot, I can forego the punch method with this. It works by tightening the threaded nuts and pulling the star nut into the steer tube at the right spot. Very simple concept made easy with a threaded rod, nuts and washers. The longer barrel nut has a threaded tip that actually threads into the star nut itself, so there is no banging or punching involved here!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0286.jpg  

    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0292.jpg  

    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0285.jpg  

    Let's see all your bike tools.-img_0287.jpg  

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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingless View Post
    When I purchased my 12T shop press it was for a specific project.

    This ended up being a surprisingly handy tool that I have used lots, for many projects.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    ^^^ Having a 12 ton shop press can be nice and I wouldn't mind having one.

    But, I have to ask, where do you need or use a 12 ton hydraulic press on bike parts?
    Quote Originally Posted by wingless View Post
    The Ratt reply showed custom presses made using bolts and pipe.

    The shop press does the same thing.

    It is also really handy to flatten or bend or shape parts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Yeah, but they don't use a 12 ton press. In fact, they don't use any type of hydraulic press. Those are using threaded rod and a maybe a hammer.
    Sure. I used my bench press yesterday to re-shape / repair my bicycle airline case latch.

    This is still a very handy and versatile tool, even on this latest bicycle project.
    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

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