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  1. #1
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    Best tool to remove cassette bearings (trek frame)

    Hello!

    I have a 2012 Trek Rumblefish that I'm completely overhauling. It's seen a lot of wear in a dry dusty environment (central Oregon) and I was pretty mean to it by never really getting it serviced. Thankfully I just took a mechanic class and my new project is working on the bike. The big change is removing the 3x10 drivetrain for a new 1x11 as well as adding a dropper post (TBD which exact kind). I've discovered a number of things to fix, clean, or replace the more I remove from the bike.. the latest were the bearings in the suspension. There are 8 total to pop out. I can't just push these out and I talked to my local bike shop and they said there was a tool at one time for this but no longer exists.

    My questions are:
    1) Is there a tool anyone knows of to remove these bearings?
    2) If there is no tool I'm assuming I can use a bolt or vice to push the bearing out provided I have something on the other side to support the frame (and not push against the bearing).

    This video has an example of the exact thing I'm doing:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuQGXbbkreM

    He has a nice small cylinder (not sure where it came from) that fit his frame and was something he could press against. This is the road I'm planning to go unless someone has better advice!

    Couple pics of the front/back of the cassette bearing:

    Best tool to remove cassette bearings (trek frame)-bearing-1.jpg
    Best tool to remove cassette bearings (trek frame)-bearing-2.jpg

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the forum.

    Whenever I am doing a project like that I use my shop press and my mechanics sockets.

    Their is always the correct socket on-hand w the appropriate outside diameter and another one with the correct inside diameter.

    My shop press was purchased for one specific job and I find myself using over and over for many jobs, like this, plus for flattening or bending where other tools are less capable or handy.

    That bearing looks impossible to remove without damage, so plan on having a replacement handy.
    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

  3. #3
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    It may be possible to press out that bearing without damage, but that may require a specialized tool, not an off-the-shelf socket.

    There is a VERY small exposed bearing lip in the bore of the part. A socket has rounded corners that won't catch / push on that lip until damage has happened to the bearing.

    A cylinder with an outside diameter that precisely matches the inside diameter of the part, that also has a sharp bottom corner will be able to catch that small exposed lip, possibly permitting the part to be pressed out without damage.

    The first step is to measure the ID of the bore. It may match standard pipe sizes, permitting a tool to be made by just cutting a pipe section to use as the pressing tool. Otherwise a lathe may be required to turn down stock to get the exact outside diameter.


    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

  4. #4
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    Note lacing the bearing is much easier if the part is frozen as cold as possible, to shrink the outside diameter. It might just push in by hand if the bearing is cold and the bike is warm room temperature.
    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

  5. #5
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    Don't know if this will give you some ideas or help in any way, but this is a guide I did for working on the Giant Trance, I had no "official" tools, just DIY and had absolutely no issues.

    https://forums.mtbr.com/giant/trance...ow-242343.html
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the replies! Related to all this, are these bearings typically held in with a little thread lock compound? I know they are not threaded in (just pressed) but did see a video where someone mentioned doing that.

  7. #7
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    I did similar job on an '08 Trek Fuel EX 8. By the way, that not a cassette bearing. That is the seat stay which makes up part of the rear triangle. anywho. As this is your first time, I caution you to be very careful as if you f up the seat in the frame where the bearing sits, you are f ed.

    If you attempt to push the bearing out by applying pressure to just the inner circle of the bearing, it will likely break the bearing apart and the outer shell of the bearing will still be in the frame.

    If I were you, I'd not remove them. the bearings can be serviced while still in the frame. You can carefully pry off the seal cover (that blue thing). You can use a box cutter blade or similar and just take your time and it will pop off. Then just spray the bearing race with parts cleaner till it is clean. Repack with grease and reinstall cover.

    Other than that you will need to hunt down the correct bearing puller. I'd email Trek and see if they would be willing to set you up. Good luck
    2015 Santa Cruz 5010 C

  8. #8
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    I'm happy to invest in the right tools (or similar) to do the job right and remove the bearings. Sadly the bearings are beyond salvaging. Of the lot, one moves ok, one moves in a really crunch fashion, and two have completely seized. It's a case study in no maintenance!

    Will contact Trek..

    On a similar note, my LBS has access to the Trek dealer portal which has all the helpful schematics and service manuals. Is there any way to access those for non-dealers?

  9. #9
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    Chemicals, including thread locker, are not used in this application.

    My jaw dropped open when I saw this previously-linked image. This is not the proper way to press out a bearing. The instructions I provided earlier, about pressing on the outer race is the correct method.

    2011 Trek 1.2 Road Bike 58 cm
    2016 Trek One Series 1.1 H2 Road Bike 54 cm

  10. #10
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    And yet it worked quite fine and loads of people followed that tutorial and also worked just fine for them. Can't count the amount if times I've used this exact same method over the years now, never had trouble, ever.Yes, a blind bearing puller would have been the right tool for the job, but I did not have one and did not feel to expense myself to just do the job for myself and as the bearings were being replaced, absolutely not an issue.

    FYI, there are some manufacturers who do install their bearings with a locking compound, just FYI.

    Quote Originally Posted by wingless View Post
    Chemicals, including thread locker, are not used in this application.

    My jaw dropped open when I saw this previously-linked image. This is not the proper way to press out a bearing. The instructions I provided earlier, about pressing on the outer race is the correct method.

    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  11. #11
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    IDK about this specific situation, but in many, it's not possible to press on the outer race to remove the bearing and you must press or pull it out using the inner race. Basically, replace the bearing if you do this as it's likely the bearing will be damaged. Bearings are cheap and you should replace it if you're going to all the work to remove it. When installing a bearing, only press on the supported race, which is almost always the outer race.

    One issue with not using an appropriate press/tool when removing or installing a bearing is the possibility of cocking the bearing in the bore. This can damage or stretch bearing pocket and loosen the interference fit. Exercise care to ensure the bearing isn't cocked.

    If you just want to clean and lubricate the bearing, that can almost always be done without removing it.
    Do the math.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingless View Post
    The instructions I provided earlier, about pressing on the outer race is the correct method.
    As previously stated, there are plenty of different Pivot Bearing applications where you do not have access to the Outer Race and have to use the Inner Race for extraction.

    Specialty tools are nice, and sometimes necessary, but there are many ways to install or extract most all bearings with common tools on-hand when some elementary skill and care are exercised.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingless View Post
    There is a VERY small exposed bearing lip in the bore of the part. A socket has rounded corners that won't catch / push on that lip until damage has happened to the bearing.
    Lots of good info in this thread. Because it wasn't mentioned, I'll just throw out there that you can use a washer between the bearing and the socket to eliminate the issue of the rounded socket corners. It'll create a nice 90 degree angle and less risk of the socket slipping and applying uneven pressure.

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