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  1. #1
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    bad quality tools list

    hello

    maybe some of you got some bad quality tools (maybe from aliexpress), that damaged your stuff?

    or maybe you can share stories how you damaged $10 ti bolt with $1 wrench?

    it is interesting to create list of tools\brands that have to be avoided

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by amer_ua View Post
    hello

    maybe some of you got some bad quality tools (maybe from aliexpress), that damaged your stuff?

    or maybe you can share stories how you damaged $10 ti bolt with $1 wrench?

    it is interesting to create list of tools\brands that have to be avoided
    That's going to be an impossible project. Far easier to talk about high quality tools.

  3. #3
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    I'll play! I haven't had any truly unusable tools or tools that have damaged parts beyond repair, but a few that I've been less than stoked about:

    1. Birzman p-handles. The tolerances aren't as good as others I've had, and they aren't that cheap. They are really light which makes them a nice toss-in for road trips and such, but I bought some Feedback t-handles that I'm in love with and roll with those now.

    2. Park cassette tools. While they're cheap, I've recently had issues with the tolerances creating a wobbly fit when you really have to crank on them, and it makes me nervous. Some of their more expensive iterations (like the one with the 12mm axle guide pin) might be better.

    3. TRP simple bleed kit. Their pro kit seems nice, but is super expensive. For $10-15, the cheap kit was tempting, but you certainly get what you pay for with the syringe and tubing. Was a nightmare to use, ended up repurposing an old Reverb bleed kit with the TRP fittings.

  4. #4
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    I'm not stoked on the Feedback Sports cassette pliers I got. They work OK, but so does a simple chain whip.
    What, me worry?

  5. #5
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    The tough part now is that when buying tools on line you cannot trust the reviews. I had a video game headset that I returned to amazon and gave the seller a bad review. The seller emailed me today offering a credit for $20 on Amazon if I removed the bad review. The bottom line if it seems to good to be true it is...you get what you pay for...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    I'm not stoked on the Feedback Sports cassette pliers I got. They work OK, but so does a simple chain whip.
    I'll go a step further on the Feedback Sport cassette pliers and say that I really didn't like them and went back to using the chain whip. I'm not sure if I like the idea of cassette pliers in general - I would look at Pedro's vice whip instead if you didn't want to mess around with the normal chain whip.

    I don't want it to sound like I am dissing Feedback Sports - I love the FS Repair Stand I have and they a great company. I just don't like cassette pliers.

  7. #7
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    Any park t25 tool sucks balls. Metal is too soft.
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  8. #8
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    Amazon's Gearwrench Hex Bit Metric Driver Socket Set.
    I exploded an 8mm loosening a crank bolt. Also, the edges are chamfered, so they rub along the retainer cap and don't allow full insertion.

    I think I'm still learning how to use it, but I bought Park Tool's DT-5.2 facing kit, and it takes so long to take off material. The cutter doesn't slide easily, so it's hard to apply pressure to get it to slide down to cut more. Also, the manual doesn't mention expanding the tool axle before tightening the frame's axle. Their youtube video explains it, though.

    I guess that's the growing pains of a new home bike wrench!
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  9. #9
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    just cheap drill bits that unravel in front of your eyes once they hook up and start cutting metal. never again.
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  10. #10
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    The Pedro cassette tool with the pegs on it works awesome. Much prefer it over a chain whip.

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  11. #11
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    I hate to say it but I am not going to be buying any more park tools. Bought the new rear derailleur hangar alignment tool, sooooooooooo much slop. You won't be able to really dial it in with this tool. Just bought the park dt - 5.2 brake post facing tool. It is worthless. Called up park and they said ( in a sarcastic way) you are not supposed to use it with carbon frames. The cutter will not cut carbon. I say why don't you say that in your adds so I know not to spend almost 400 on your crap. They hung up.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by timsmcm View Post
    I hate to say it but I am not going to be buying any more park tools. Bought the new rear derailleur hangar alignment tool, sooooooooooo much slop. You won't be able to really dial it in with this tool. Just bought the park dt - 5.2 brake post facing tool. It is worthless. Called up park and they said ( in a sarcastic way) you are not supposed to use it with carbon frames. The cutter will not cut carbon. I say why don't you say that in your adds so I know not to spend almost 400 on your crap. They hung up.
    Wow, really? This is frustrating to hear. The deeper I get into bike maintenance, the more I realize how many manufacturers are just squeaking by in terms of Quality. The DT-5.2 also moves around a lot.
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  13. #13
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    I'd bet a shiny penny pedros chain tool is just a rebadged Super B TB-FW50.

  14. #14
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    I like Park Tools. Not saying everything they make is great but I have some nice stuff from them.

    Masterlink pliers
    Master chain tool is a thing of beauty
    Spoke tension meter
    Pedal wrench
    BB tool
    Brake pad separator
    Handlebar holder
    Various wrenches
    8mm hex tool- great for old cranks

    And my favorite, the PRS3.2 repair stand. Total game changer for bike maintenance. Especially for ebikes.

    Definitely prefer Pedro's vice whip over, well, just about anything.

    I have the DAG tool but have never used it.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    I'm not stoked on the Feedback Sports cassette pliers I got. They work OK, but so does a simple chain whip.
    I got these as part of a toolkit; they eventually do the job but it is a real pain to adjust the bite and angle so they have a good grip on the cassette.

  16. #16
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    Buy quality tools and don't worry about all the crap tools out there.
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  17. #17
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    I have used the 5.2 to face a carbon brake mount. The rear mount on my Cervelo roadbike was pretty out of spec and not supposed to be faced (per Cervelo). I was able to remove a little carbon with the 5.2 and got the rear brake to a place that was tolerable to ride.

    I have faced other flat mounts and all of the post mounts on my MTBs. The tool does work slow but I think that it is a good thing. This is not an application where you want to take off to much material to quickly.

    One thing for sure is if you are facing a fork, take it off the bike. Just this week I faced a brand new fork before it was even installed and it was x10 easier than doing it on the bike.

    Overall its a great tool but kind of a tough pill to swallow at $450. I have owned the Hope Spot facing tool as well as the Magura in the past which were both for ISO mounts only. The park tool is far better IMHO.

    Quote Originally Posted by OneBoot View Post
    Amazon's Gearwrench Hex Bit Metric Driver Socket Set.
    I exploded an 8mm loosening a crank bolt. Also, the edges are chamfered, so they rub along the retainer cap and don't allow full insertion.

    I think I'm still learning how to use it, but I bought Park Tool's DT-5.2 facing kit, and it takes so long to take off material. The cutter doesn't slide easily, so it's hard to apply pressure to get it to slide down to cut more. Also, the manual doesn't mention expanding the tool axle before tightening the frame's axle. Their youtube video explains it, though.

    I guess that's the growing pains of a new home bike wrench!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    I have used the 5.2 to face a carbon brake mount. The rear mount on my Cervelo roadbike was pretty out of spec and not supposed to be faced (per Cervelo). I was able to remove a little carbon with the 5.2 and got the rear brake to a place that was tolerable to ride.

    I have faced other flat mounts and all of the post mounts on my MTBs. The tool does work slow but I think that it is a good thing. This is not an application where you want to take off to much material to quickly.

    One thing for sure is if you are facing a fork, take it off the bike. Just this week I faced a brand new fork before it was even installed and it was x10 easier than doing it on the bike.

    Overall its a great tool but kind of a tough pill to swallow at $450. I have owned the Hope Spot facing tool as well as the Magura in the past which were both for ISO mounts only. The park tool is far better IMHO.
    I agree that slow is a good thing. I think I dulled the cutter trying to face with the axle installed improperly. Luckily, I know now, and the cutter is an easier price to swallow than a new facing tool.

    I hadn't even installed the fork yet. I was using a saw guide at my local co-op. A previous user had left the bolt that secures the rubber clamp so loose, that my fork was being held by the bolt, not the rubber. Ruined a brand new fork

    I swear, if I ever get into making bikes, or building bikes, my company name will be OCD Cycles or something like that.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBoot View Post
    I agree that slow is a good thing. I think I dulled the cutter trying to face with the axle installed improperly. Luckily, I know now, and the cutter is an easier price to swallow than a new facing tool.

    I hadn't even installed the fork yet. I was using a saw guide at my local co-op. A previous user had left the bolt that secures the rubber clamp so loose, that my fork was being held by the bolt, not the rubber. Ruined a brand new fork

    I swear, if I ever get into making bikes, or building bikes, my company name will be OCD Cycles or something like that.
    Don't bother buying a cutter. Contact a local machine shop that sharpens taps/dies/cutters. Rates are likely FAR more reasonable than even just buying a cutter; other plus: if you tell them what you are cutting with it, it can be sharpened to cut that material better (which has largely to do with the angle of the cutting face).

    If it was a drill bit/other 'low tech' cutting tool, I'd say try it yourself, but since it needs to remain perpendicular to the guide/parallel with the surface...

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by zhendo View Post
    2. Park cassette tools. While they're cheap, I've recently had issues with the tolerances creating a wobbly fit when you really have to crank on them, and it makes me nervous. Some of their more expensive iterations (like the one with the 12mm axle guide pin) might be better.
    I used my old Park cassette tool with the QR guide pin for a while after getting a TA bike but got tired of it always getting misaligned when torquing on it. Purchased the model with 12mm guide pin and it is a HUGE improvement. Always stays properly aligned and is great to use. Right tool for the job.

  21. #21
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    This exactly. The blades dont hold their sharpness for too long. Park will sharpen the blade for $20 but shipping it back is a pain when you can do it locally.

    I would love to find where Park sources the cutting blade and pick a couple up for cheap.

    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    Don't bother buying a cutter. Contact a local machine shop that sharpens taps/dies/cutters. Rates are likely FAR more reasonable than even just buying a cutter; other plus: if you tell them what you are cutting with it, it can be sharpened to cut that material better (which has largely to do with the angle of the cutting face).

    If it was a drill bit/other 'low tech' cutting tool, I'd say try it yourself, but since it needs to remain perpendicular to the guide/parallel with the surface...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    Don't bother buying a cutter. Contact a local machine shop that sharpens taps/dies/cutters. Rates are likely FAR more reasonable than even just buying a cutter; other plus: if you tell them what you are cutting with it, it can be sharpened to cut that material better (which has largely to do with the angle of the cutting face).

    If it was a drill bit/other 'low tech' cutting tool, I'd say try it yourself, but since it needs to remain perpendicular to the guide/parallel with the surface...
    That's a great idea! Thank you! I wonder if they do boutique sharpening where it's an aluminum insert and carbon exterior
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheOtherOne View Post
    I used my old Park cassette tool with the QR guide pin for a while after getting a TA bike but got tired of it always getting misaligned when torquing on it. Purchased the model with 12mm guide pin and it is a HUGE improvement. Always stays properly aligned and is great to use. Right tool for the job.
    I've been using the IceToolz and it works well but now that I see this might have to add another Park to the collection

  24. #24
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    I don't know much about the subject but I did have to buy a special carbon blade from Park to cut a carbon steerer tube and bars, definitely different than the normal metal blade.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBoot View Post
    That's a great idea! Thank you! I wonder if they do boutique sharpening where it's an aluminum insert and carbon exterior
    No, you would probably need to leave it as is. Honestly, the largest issue is keeping the cutter in contact with consistent pressure. Tools designed for accurate facing have a backing spring that pushes the cutter into contact with the surface. The issue with cutting CF-reinforced parts isn't that it won't cut (it will), but that it tends to tear if the cutting tool isn't super sharp.

    Quote Originally Posted by dundundata View Post
    I don't know much about the subject but I did have to buy a special carbon blade from Park to cut a carbon steerer tube and bars, definitely different than the normal metal blade.
    Even that isn't a special bike-only tool. It's a carbide grit blade, and are typically used for cutting glass, ceramic, or tile.

  26. #26
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    Park tools are just the cheapest chinese tools from home depot that someone spray paints blue

    But they work. They absolutely work and are by far the industry standard. Why? Because we don't really need "good" tools for bikes. We're torquing stuff to maybe 40 nm if its "tight". Any piece of crap tool can take 40nm.

    I like bondhaus hex wrenches because they tend to be oversized, and bike fasteners tend to be on the loose side. It works out great. Most hex, park included, are often loose on a bike. Its the fastener and not the tool, but still. Bondhaus is a good solution (and they're cheap).

    If you truly want the nice stuff, get abbey tools. They're not necessary, but thats the real high end. https://www.abbeybiketools.com/

    There was this huge tool company consolidation a few years back. Seems like everyone bought and sold to someone, and we ended up with what amounts to asian high end tools. They really are good too, and they're cheap. It used to be that you bought american made tools, or you bought total garbage. Its just not the case anymore. Heres kind of a rough breakdown of who owns who:
    https://toolguyd.com/tool-brands-cor...-affiliations/

    Bike tools fall somewhere in the low end of the asian rebrands.

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