Switchblade pivot replacement question- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Daniel the Dog
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    New question here. Switchblade pivot replacement question

    My Blade still has solid pivots. However, eventually, like everything that moves on this planet, they will wear out. Can they be replaced at home? How much is the pivot kit? Can you go to a bearing house and get them? I don't have a local bike shop that sells Blades.

    Thanks,

    Jaybo

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Titus does sell the bearing kits for the Switchblade which includes the Horst Link bushing kit plus sealed bearings for BB pivot and rocker arm. Should cost you around $75-80. You could go to a bearing house and get the sealed bearings for the bottom bracket and rocker arms. You will probably need 6802 bearings for the BB and 608 bearings for the rocker arm but check to make sure. The Horst Link pivot you would have to get straight from Titus or a Titus dealer. Hope the info helps.

    Frank

  3. #3

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    I'm confused Jaybo, by "solid pivots" do you mean Delrin bushings? I thought your Blade was an '02 model, didn't they have cartridge bearings? The Delrin ones, which are basically bushings with a flange, are stocked at some LBS as many frames use them. I know there has been an aftermarket upgrade needle bearing kit made for the Speciallized FSR frames (heavy and expensive, but quite an improvement), but I've never heard of one for the Titus frames. It would be worth looking into if you could find one.

  4. #4
    Daniel the Dog
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    New question here. I'm talking about the bearings

    I'm going to eat through bearings on any bike in my harsh climate. I'm wondering when the bearings wear out, how hard are they to replace. The Fox Float bushings is an every 6 week afair. I might try the new new pin deal from Titus. I would rather replace the bearings myself then pay some hack to do it at the LBS (assuming they will for a bike they don't carry). Thanks for information.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    I'm going to eat through bearings on any bike in my harsh climate. I'm wondering when the bearings wear out, how hard are they to replace. The Fox Float bushings is an every 6 week afair. I might try the new new pin deal from Titus. I would rather replace the bearings myself then pay some hack to do it at the LBS (assuming they will for a bike they don't carry). Thanks for information.
    As far as I know Titus has been using the Max Enduro bearings for at least the last couple years and they hold up pretty well. Being the full ball compliment type with extra grease volume, they are much better than the bearings most manufacturers used to spec which were the retainer type with about 30% grease fill, and primarily an electric motor type bearing made for high rpms and heat expansion. If you're carefull you can take a tiny flat tipped tool (like a jewler's screwdriver) and pry the seals off the bearings about once a year to add some grease, just make sure you pry the outer edge, not the inner one where the bearing spins. The trick is to lay the tool down almost flat to the face of the bearing and carefully slide the tip of the tool under the the bearing's outer race before lifting it up to pry out the seal. Some do this with a dental tool, but I find their small round tips can dent the edge of the seal. You may end up bending the seal's metal backing plate a bit, but if it isn't too crooked, you can usually flatten them back out. As for how to replace the bearings, they're best pressed out carefully with the right diameter socket and a vise. It even works better if you file the rounded edge off the socket, so you have a very flat fitting press dye that won't slip. I would guess the Max Enduros will last you at least a full year of hard riding even if you don't maintain them, as long as you don't do the no no of pressure washing your bike. I lucked out when I had to make calls back and forth to Intense and Fox when my shock pin was not fitting the diameter of the shock's eyelet bushing on my Uzzi SL. After sending me 3 or four pins, some plated, and one coated with an experimental dry lube Intense was working on at the time, I finally got a pin of at least the right length anyway, which eliminated the lateral binding between the link plates, and allowed shock position changes without loosening all the freaking link bolts. Fox ended up sending me about 3 spare eyelet bushings and the press tool they use to remove/install them ($40.00 tool). That and a 4.5" opening vise( $15.00 at Sears) works as easy as pie. What I did to make the most out of the bushings was to remove and reinstall them after rotating 180 degrees. There's usually a black wear spot that developes where the shock pin pushes against the bushing. My Uzzi wore them out too, as do many FSR design bikes, due to more rotation at the lower shock pivot, just one reason I like the Mac Strut designs better in some ways. One thing you might try is antiseize (also called Ti Prep) between the shock pin and bushing. One recent post from a rider that tried it for that application said that it stays in place and helps the bushings last. You can get larger amounts cheap in the autopparts stores, but I like the Finish Line Ti Prep (if they still sell it) which is exactly the same thing in a handy syringe with a twist lock head, that gets into small places easily.
    Last edited by _-^^^-_; 01-11-2004 at 10:20 PM.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by _-^^^-_
    As far as I know Titus has been using the Max Enduro bearings for at least the last couple years and they hold up pretty well. Being the full ball compliment type with extra grease volume, they are much better than the bearings most manufacturers used to spec which were the retainer type with about 30% grease fill, and primarily an electric motor type bearing made for high rpms and heat expansion. If you're carefull you can take a tiny flat tipped tool (like a jewler's screwdriver) and pry the seals off the bearings about once a year to add some grease, just make sure you pry the outer edge, not the inner one where the bearing spins. The trick is to lay the tool down almost flat to the face of the bearing and carefully slide the tip of the tool under the the bearing's outer race before lifting it up to pry out the seal. Some do this with a dental tool, but I find their small round tips can dent the edge of the seal. You may end up bending the seal's metal backing plate a bit, but if it isn't too crooked, you can usually flatten them back out. As for how to replace the bearings, they're best pressed out carefully with the right diameter socket and a vise. It even works better if you file the rounded edge off the socket, so you have a very flat fitting press dye that won't slip. I would guess the Max Enduros will last you at least a full year of hard riding even if you don't maintain them, as long as you don't do the no no of pressure washing your bike. I lucked out when I had to make calls back and forth to Intense and Fox when my shock pin was not fitting the diameter of the shock's eyelet bushing on my Uzzi SL. After sending me 3 or four pins, some plated, and one coated with an experimental dry lube Intense was working on at the time, I finally got a pin of at least the right length anyway, which eliminated the lateral binding between the link plates, and allowed shock position changes without loosening all the freaking link bolts. Fox ended up sending me about 3 spare eyelet bushings and the press tool they use to remove/install them ($40.00 tool). That and a 4.5" opening vise( $15.00 at Sears) works as easy as pie. What I did to make the most out of the bushings was to remove and reinstall them after rotating 180 degrees. There's usually a black wear spot that developes where the shock pin pushes against the bushing. My Uzzi wore them out too, as do many FSR design bikes, due to more rotation at the lower shock pivot, just one reason I like the Mac Strut designs better in some ways. One thing you might try is antiseize (also called Ti Prep) between the shock pin and bushing. One recent post from a rider that tried it for that application said that it stays in place and helps the bushings last. You can get larger amounts cheap in the autopparts stores, but I like the Finish Line Ti Prep (if they still sell it) which is exactly the same thing in a handy syringe with a twist lock head, that gets into small places easily.
    Jaybo, here's a more detailed explanation of how to replace your bearings and Horst bushings from Titus' site. The socket and vise method really only works for the links.
    http://www.titusti.com/swblade_om.html

  7. #7
    Tonight we ride.
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    Every few months, clean the Igus bushings with windex and then give them some grease, like judy butter, slick honey, or prep m. I think you will find that they are very durable. Mine have 1300 miles on them, and it's been a very muddy year here in VA.

    I replaced the bearings with abec 7 versions purchased online. You can get the 608 size used on the linkage plates cheaply on ebay, as they are the same size as skateboard bearings. Just make sure you get them packed with grease, and that they use rubber seals.

    I believe the Enduro bearings are abec 3 or 5, they offer both.

    I hate these new forums. Now MTBR looks like every other cookie cutter website.

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