What do I need to know about MTB in Texas?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What do I need to know about MTB in Texas?

    I'm going to cut to the chase: my company won't be reopening in 2021 at all and my wife's family is in Texas. We are considering moving and Texas is on the list.

    Give me the straight talk, whether that's telling me it sucks so I don't come, or telling me its hot as hades (which I know it is).

  2. #2
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    Trailforks. and Singletrack.

    What do I need to know about MTB in Texas?-p6pb18183630.jpg

    Austin

    What do I need to know about MTB in Texas?-p6pb17107941.jpg
    Last edited by eb1888; 6 Days Ago at 07:39 AM.

  3. #3
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    you can ride almost year round depending what part of texas you are in, and I don't mind the heat here. A 100+ is still riding weather to me, just means less mosquitoes and less people on the trail. The Austin area has a lot to offer as does the Dallas area and there are several private ranches, areas that cater to mountain bikes.

    You might want to check out AustinBike.com - Home

    hopefully this will give you a more detailed answer about some of the stuff to ride around texas mainly around the austin area.

  4. #4
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    Central TX trails trails are fun, abundant and challenging. We effectively have a 9 month riding season. Better to be on the lake from mid June till mid September.
    Good luck.

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  5. #5
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    We ride year round!

    Given the choice Iíd pick Austin or Dallas. I live in Houston. Itís alright here and it is getting better so I canít complain too much.


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  6. #6
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    Can't say for other places but if you come to Austin I hope you like rocky tech.
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  7. #7
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    It's hot a lot of the year. I would avoid the Gulf coast unless you like it flat, wet, and gross. That includes Houston. Central Texas has legit hills and chunky trails. I lived in San Antonio for several years and enjoyed it. I'm in Austin now and the only problem is that it's population is growing much faster than the infrastructure can, so traffic and general crowding sucks.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Trailforks.
    Wrong. Not in Texas.


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  9. #9
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    Summers suck most everywhere and winters suck up north, otherwise you generally have decent year round riding if you are South of roughly Lubbock. Almost nothing on the coast if you're looking that direction. You don't have the huge elevation changes you get in the mountains but there is more than respectable riding in the hill country, Austin, SA, Kerrville, etc. Get used to riding on limestone and through limestone rock fields, super gnarly on many of the trails.

    Is there somewhere specific you were looking to move to? It's a big state.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jestep View Post

    Is there somewhere specific you were looking to move to?
    I should have specified, either Austin or Dallas (or somewhere else I'm not aware of but in the general area). The idea is to be close to family (a few hours drive) in Houston (but not too close that they can just show up unannounced...)

  11. #11
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    What do I need to know about MTB in Texas?

    Depending on who you ride with and how you ride. I canít recommend Austin enough. Location will be determined by the above. (Riding with kids, family, etc.)

    We have some extremely technical unrelenting terrain at times. We also have some fast buff stuff like Walnut Creek.

    There are several mountain biking realty/mortgage teams that can help you get set up in a good place.

    Phil Barton or Heather Brown.

    The most ride in/ride out occurs by living in:

    South Austin around MoPac and Circle C near escarpment and Slaughter. (Flatter, twisty, fast with some rocks.)

    Travis country or Barton skyway on the Barton Greenbelt. (Austin Tech, a mix of every Thing on a 60+ mile trail system. Plenty of climbing if you want, but avoidable climbing if you want. Always rocks) you also have proximity to south Austin trails listed above.

    Downtown and Zilker Travis heights also has quick access to the Barton Greenbelt. You have the 10 mile hike and bike around the lake which connects over to our bike path system. This is super important if you want a ling protected route for ďroadĒ rides.

    Living near any of the two above give great access to over 120 miles of trail that can all be connected for different routes.


    Anything around Walnut Creek park. (12 mile trail system) this area has some cultural hotspots, so that maybe or may not be a fit depending upon exactly where you reside.

    There are off grid trails that are awesome and challenging in a more expensive north central area. Home prices will be high, but there are also some apartments with sweet access and amazing view here. We can help offline if you are interested.

    Pretty much everything else is smaller, or not in Austin.

    Lakeway has a couple trail systems and a good riding/building group. LAME. They are also a closer drive to three other trail systems. Reimerís ranch, Pace Bend and Mule Shoe.

    Lake Georgetown is an infamous loop you can live near (again, not Austin) half of it is extremely rocky. Itís still possible to find the flow and go extremely fast.

    Then Texas has lots of private land trails on ranches where people ride and race.
    Reveille peak ranch -1 hour from Austin
    Flat rock Ranch - 100 minutes away. one of the highest rated trails. (32mi marked system)
    Rocky hill ranch. - 45 min away. different terrain, piney woods with pea gravel river rock over red clay. No rocks but roots. 25ish miles plus a jump progression park.


    Houston is flat, they have a of folks that work hard to make use of the bayous and drainage ditches/creeks they through. Itís made of sand. Only go there is you have to for work.

    Dallas is massive. It has a different culture. You can see systems on trail forks. The problem is, the cool spots to live in are not the ones near trails. Unless you are fine with a single trail system access.


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    Last edited by FJSnoozer; 6 Days Ago at 07:59 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post

    There are several mountain biking realty/mortgage teams that can help you get set up in a good place.
    "You must spread some rep around before giving it to FJSnoozer again"



    This was great, thank you.

  13. #13
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    Depends on the areas. Austin vs Dallas trails are very different. DFW trails are very XC with a few exceptions. Plus the trails in DFW dont drain as well (partially due to soil and partially due to the limited elevation change we have). Our weather would be perfect for year round riding but when it rains in the winter one storm can shut down all the trails for several weeks. During the summer rain will typically shut down trails for 1 to 4 days depending on how much we get. You can check the trails status for dfw at:

    Dallas Off Road Bicycle Association
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  14. #14
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    Houston: https://www.houstonchronicle.com/bus...s-15566695.php

    "The Houston region will experience longer and hotter summers, heavier bouts of rain and stronger hurricanes through the end of the century due to climate change, according to a climate assessment report published Monday.

    Using data from 11 weather stations across the Greater Houston area, Texas Tech Climate Center scientists Anne Stoner and Katharine Hayhoe found that Houston has already experienced significant increases in temperature since 1950 due to climate change. Over the rest of the century, the region will see even longer summers, more days of 100-degree heat, hotter nights and more intense rainstorms."

    the mosquitoes are gonna be horrific, as if they're not bad enough already.

  15. #15
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    Been riding North and Central Texas trails since the mid 70's. Yeah, I'm old. And yeah, trails back then were merely cattle paths. But Texas MTB has evolved very nicely.

    As already mentioned, the further south you go, the more rocky tech it gets. But there are two primary MTB "spots". Central Texas and North Texas. Honestly, for all 'round riding convenience, it's hard to beat North Texas (we call it DFW). If you live within Dallas Forth Worth, you're within 45 minutes of nearly 300 miles of single track ranging from flat fast XC, to slow crawling rock gardens, to fast "flowy" with man made features tossed about and 8'+ drop. Pretty much all trials are stacked loop. But rain can put a damper on things (as already mentioned). The soil here is clay, so rain shuts things down in order to save trails.

    DORBA is the primary MTB org in DFW, but not the only. There's also the Fort Worth Mountain Bikers Association and the Weatherford Mountain Bike Club. The latter two have trails that rival central Texas rocky technical stuff. There are also a few trails that are not managed by these three organizations. You can find them on Trailforks.

    A big plus for North Texas is relative proximity to other hot spots. Easy weekend MTB trips to places like Northwest Arkansas/Bentonville and Central New Mexico (Angle Fire, etc.). Check 'em out if you're not familiar with these two spots. DFW is also an easy long weekend to Colorado. We do trips there for front range and central slopes riding. DFW is, obviously, close enough to Central Texas for weekend rides. A fun trip is to Spider Mountain, the one and only lift served bike park in Texas.

    The heat... yeah, Texas gets pretty warm, but no worse than much of the Southwest. The issue in Texas is humidity. It gets up there, and can make an 80 degree day feel like 100. But, you do acclimate. Yes, you can ride year 'round here. Most people I ride with from colder climates will accept a warm North Texas day to a cold winter day in the north any day of the week.

    Since you're talking about moving for reasons that sound like job searching ("my company won't be reopening in 2021"), then DFW may be the place for you. Despite the fact that DFW grows my nearly 10,000 new people a month moving into it, jobs are plentiful. As they say here, if you can't find work, you just don't want to work. As for real estate, it's a hot sellers market. The last time I looked in my area, average days on the market for a new listing was 4 days. But you can still get a newly built 3,000+ sf home for the price of a used mobile home on the west coast.

    You can't go wrong, MTB wise, with North or Central Texas. I will say, though, that Central Texas has more to offer beyond mountain biking. Great lakes/boating activity, river rafting/tubing, the Hill Country, little German towns, great weekend car rides and getaways, incredible Springs (think bluebonnet explosion), caverns, good hiking, etc. And if you're into wine... over 100 of the 500+ wineries in Texas are in central Texas (check out Fredericksburg). Plenty of distilleries and micro breweries as well for us none wine drinkers. But all of this is within a 4 hour drive from DFW...
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

  16. #16
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Hilarious!.
    I've always thought of the panhandle as that patch of hell before you get to heaven (Colorado or home). The drive up is bearable but that drive home suuuuuuuuuuucks.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by willawry'd View Post
    Hilarious!.
    I've always thought of the panhandle as that patch of hell before you get to heaven (Colorado or home). The drive up is bearable but that drive home suuuuuuuuuuucks.
    Itís great if you stop at Palo Duro canyon. What an amazing place.


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    Itís great if you stop at Palo Duro canyon. What an amazing place.


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    Palo Duro and Caprock might be the only saving grace for the entire region...

    I definitely don't understand the population growth in the area though. There are few places in the entire US less appealing than the panhandle IMO.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jestep View Post
    ... I definitely don't understand the population growth in the area though. There are few places in the entire US less appealing than the panhandle IMO.
    Just about any large metro area in the north, northeast, or west coast, comes to mind. Actually kinda sad in some cases.
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

  21. #21
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    You can find out all about the Austin trails here:

    AustinBike.com - Home
    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

    http://www.austinbike.com

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Trailforks. and Singletrack.

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    Austin

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    We've got some cleaning up to do, there are a ton of trees down from the recent storms. Thumper is a great trail.

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