Weapon of Choice for City Park and Brushy Creek?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Weapon of Choice for City Park and Brushy Creek?

    Curious what sort of setups people are using for City Park and Brushy Creek. Still dominated by 29" or are some of the newer 27.5" rigs making a dent? Debating between an Ibis Ripley and an Ibis HD3. I'm aiming to test them both in Santa Cruz on my next business trip, but won't be able to try any of them locally.

    Coming from a 26" Ibis Mojo SL and figure either is a huge upgrade. Just curious if folks think one might be better suited for these trails than the other.

  2. #2
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    i would say at CP, a small majority running 27.5. If I were getting a new bike to ride there, Id get a 27.5. i generally think of a smaller wheeled bike as easier to manual/huck, and a larger wheel as easier to just roll down big obstacles. I like to huck off stuff, so i generally prefer the smaller wheel.

    EDIT - im still riding a 26er because I spent a bunch of money on it and it still rides great for me. 140 travel in rear, 160 pike up front. Makes CP a ton of fun.
    Last edited by sooner518; 04-29-2015 at 07:26 AM.

  3. #3
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    Thx for the reply! Would love to know what the other 93 people who read this thought as well. LOL

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    I ride a 29er out there (Yeti SB95) I like to roll most of the stuff out there. Also huck sometimes in the more open areas. I rode a my old Giant DS Warp II 26er out there for a while before getting the Yeti and jumping to a larger wheel diameter was like night and day for me personally. I do know that personal choice on wheel diameter is huge. It's all it what you like and your riding style. Kinda like Clips Vs flats. Mine is a 29er. Deception has a lot of smaller obstacles that a larger wheel just rolls over. Rolling resistance is less with a larger wheel. I ride with 4 people out there almost every Thursday night. 3 have 29ers, 2 have 650b. That debate rages all the time among us. After you demo those rides, you'll know

  5. #5
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    I would say the majority are on 29ers because 27.5 are relatively new and there are fewer of them on the trails, 29ers have the install base.

    I ride a 29er out there. Over time, 27.5 will probably take over, but not for a few more years. Not until 26ers are dead.
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  6. #6
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    I'm not real experienced but I'm going to give you my opinion as I have ridden both trails a bit. 29ers mostly work better on Central TX trails because it's so rocky, but I have yet to personally ride a 29er I enjoyed.

    In the MX community there is always this huge battle between the old school 2 strokes (even brand new ones) and the now dominant 4 strokes. I liken 2 strokes to 26" bikes and 4 strokes to 29" bikes. One is more fun to ride, one is faster and easier to ride.

    I ride a Bronson and I feel it's a good compromise on Central TX trails and as I progress as a rider I think it's nimbleness (comparative to a 29er) is a good fit for me.

    Deception has tight hairpins and some punchy short climbs at one end. I struggle to manuever those on my 650b personally. A 29er would be useful in the middlish section but any bike can do that stuff. Just a 29er would excel at it.

    CP has some very tough climbs for me, I try (still learning) to yank around the bike to get it over obstacles. Sometimes I stall out, yank up to move my front wheel over, and then continue on without putting a foot down and I couldn't imagine me doing that succesfully on a 29er. I only occasionally pull it off now!

    I do feel if you buy a 29er that you need to buy absolutely top shelf wheels to make it worth a darn.

    Either way, you are riding some great trails and are going to have a good time. Good Luck!

  7. #7
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    I actually found that I am a lot better on a 29er, especially on the climbs.
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    29er, 4-5" travel, not too slack geo. . . .basically the standard 29er trailbike.

    The big wheels float over the chunk easier. 4-5" of travel handles most gnars (there is some stuff where a bigger bike is nice). Since our trails never go up or down for very long, the geo needs to be neutral/balanced. Think Tallboy LT, SB-95, RIP9, Ripley, Mach429 etc.

    If you're an experienced bike handler and you have a flowy riding style, 27.5 or (gasp) 26 would be good to check out. Otherwise, get a 29er and monster-truck everything.

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    My 26 was a blur (140mm) and my 29 is a rip9 with 140mm. Can't say enough about having some good squish. Generally I've seen people on full DH rigs (6"+) and they don't do as well. They crush it on the down, but have a lot of problem on the ups because many of those climbs are short and steep, with obstacles and turns on them. Thinking especially about the one at ~1.27Mi in the current direction when you go up a ledge, cut between some rocks, go up a few more ledges and then have to do a sharp left over a small ledge by a root and then keep riding the rocks up. It's all about the short stab at that point.
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  10. #10
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    My voodoo canzo 29 cleans way more than my titus switchblade 26 ever did. bigger contact patch spins out less on climbs, and larger wheels don't get stuck on ledgy ups as easy.
    650b would be harder than the canzo I think.
    Keep trying to do the awesomest thing you've ever done.

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    You're not going to go wrong either way. Both are sweet bikes. If I were in the market for a new bike, the Ripley would be at the top of my list. I've been on a 29er for years, and for me, there is no looking back. The difference in climbing chunky stuff was night and day compared to a 26". I've ridden a handful of demo 27.5's (one at Brushy), but I can't say too much about them. They feel in between 26 and 29. Not exactly brilliant insight there.

    There is no right or wrong answer. The HD3 will probably feel more like your current bike and hence, more comforting out of the gate. With that in mind, I'd start with the Ripley. Get out of your comfort zone and see how it feels.

    I think I heard somewhere that Cycle Progression had a Ibis demo/rental that you can take to your test trail of choice.

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    Thx for the replies folks! Sadly, no Ibis demo/rentals @ Cycle Progression (although they'll special order for you).

    I'll try to give a Ripley a demo the next time I'm in Silicon Valley for work.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pelly_NH View Post
    Thx for the replies folks! Sadly, no Ibis demo/rentals @ Cycle Progression (although they'll special order for you).
    I'll try to give a Ripley a demo the next time I'm in Silicon Valley for work.
    29er for sure. Get a Ripley or a Turner Czar for carbon. If you want indestructible, get a Turner Sultan! It's the best all-rounder I've ever ridden. Especially when draped in carbon.

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    Also considering the Evil Following...seems to be a punchy 29" like the Ripley.

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    Perhaps the 93 non-posters have 26 hardtails like I do and you have convinced them not to come to CP.

    I'd like to give it a shot pretty soon once it dries up. I cant clear the 1st wall at BCGB, but the rest of the trail is my normal ride.

    Are there unaviodable 2'+ drops or are we talking 12-18 inches?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    Perhaps the 93 non-posters have 26 hardtails like I do and you have convinced them not to come to CP.

    I'd like to give it a shot pretty soon once it dries up. I cant clear the 1st wall at BCGB, but the rest of the trail is my normal ride.

    Are there unaviodable 2'+ drops or are we talking 12-18 inches?
    you will come across unavoidable 2+ foot drops many times during one lap at CP. i mean, theyre avoidable if you can stop in time, but many of them have no cheater lines around them. i havent ever gotten out a tape measure, but probably the biggest single drop at CP on the main loop is between 3 and 4 feet. although, right as you start the trail, you will see a 5 footer off to your right.

  17. #17
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    I did two loops out there at Emma Long last Tuesday and even with all of the rain it was very ridable. I literally rode up an entire section that had water cascading down it the entire time and it was actually the first time I had cleared the entire thing.

    It has drops, and I'm still learning how to do drops, but I didn't walk anything. I rode around 1, and the others I just did a little wheelie and a few I even slowly rolled off. Once drops get to 3'+ I lose my nerve!

    I don't recall a 5' drop but that's probably because I didn't even consider going off something like that.

    The worst part was cleaning the bike and gear all up. I feel like all of the gritty dirt just isn't good for those components.

    I also tried to ride behind Specs last Friday and it was a muddy mess and totally not worth it. We are pretty rained out right now and it's not going to get better for sometime.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    Perhaps the 93 non-posters have 26 hardtails like I do and you have convinced them not to come to CP.

    I'd like to give it a shot pretty soon once it dries up. I cant clear the 1st wall at BCGB, but the rest of the trail is my normal ride.

    Are there unaviodable 2'+ drops or are we talking 12-18 inches?
    As someone who also rides a 26" long travel hardtail, CP is a fun place to ride. There is a good amount of stuff that I just can't take (me not the bike) but there is a good amount of stuff that can be cleaned if you just session and have someone show you the smarter lines. The 5' drop sooner518 is talking about is a mangler.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pelly_NH View Post
    Also considering the Evil Following...seems to be a punchy 29" like the Ripley.
    The Following looks pretty sweet.
    Evil The Following | 2015 Bible of Bike Tests Roundtable Reels

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I did two loops out there at Emma Long last Tuesday and even with all of the rain it was very ridable. I literally rode up an entire section that had water cascading down it the entire time and it was actually the first time I had cleared the entire thing.

    It has drops, and I'm still learning how to do drops, but I didn't walk anything. I rode around 1, and the others I just did a little wheelie and a few I even slowly rolled off. Once drops get to 3'+ I lose my nerve!

    I don't recall a 5' drop but that's probably because I didn't even consider going off something like that.

    The worst part was cleaning the bike and gear all up. I feel like all of the gritty dirt just isn't good for those components.

    I also tried to ride behind Specs last Friday and it was a muddy mess and totally not worth it. We are pretty rained out right now and it's not going to get better for sometime.
    the 5 footer is literally the first thing you see as you start the ride. I took this GoPro last week. This drop is about 16 seconds in. Youll see, right after the drop, it dumps me out into the parking lot. You can also see it from the bottom at 47 seconds in:


    Honestly, a lot of the stuff out there you CAN roll down, but some you really cant and will get you into trouble.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMentallo View Post
    As someone who also rides a 26" long travel hardtail, CP is a fun place to ride. There is a good amount of stuff that I just can't take (me not the bike) but there is a good amount of stuff that can be cleaned if you just session and have someone show you the smarter lines. The 5' drop sooner518 is talking about is a mangler.
    After watching that Video and being underwhelmed i dont thing CP is in the cards. 3 foot drops are fun, but not on my current carbon HT. Unless you guys tell me otherwise.

    I built this bike for speed and fun at walnut creek and Barton GB so I guess I will just stay there.

    We are heading out to reveille peak ranch in august. I assume I can have days of fun out there on the HT but am also thinking of grabbing a rental Full suspension 29 as backup for some of the gnarlier trails.

  22. #22
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    Why don't you try Brushy Creek once it dries out? It's a happy medium between Walnut Creek and City Park. There's only a couple of things that shouldn't be done on a hardtail and those are purpose built hucks that are easily avoided. Loads of diversity in trails and not all of it is City Park style of technical. There is some, but it is much more spaced out and not as intimidating.

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    Man I want to ride City Park, that just looks fun and challenging! It's on my short list (as well as Brushy Creek) for my next Central TX excursion. I Wish I had something like that in my area. Firstly just being able to decide if the conditions are acceptable for riding without being told would be awesome. Thx for the video sooner518.

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    I've ridden city park a bunch of times but not brushy creek yet. I've heard about brushy creek and plan to do it. '13 Spec. Carbon Enduro 26 (160 mm travel) is my current bike I take to the hill country. Years ago we used to tear city park up on hard tails because that's all we had back then.

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    I ride most everything with a 120f/100r Pivot 429C. No real need for a bigger bike for anything I've found in TX (though I've demo'd a Mach 6 at both CP and Greenbelt and as a 2nd bike, it'd be awesome).

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    A lot of people in ATX ride capable shorter travel XC bikes on these sorts of trails just fine. In my experience they go faster overall and they break bike parts constantly. I have a friend that is a better rider than me, and he rides short travel bikes. Breaks rims, seat posts, and handlebars pretty regularly too.

    A lot of people ride the wrong kind of bike around here imo and are usually underbiked if they ride Travis Country/ Emma/ Dump Truck/ etc.... I get a lot of comments from people on the trails that think my Bronson is only appropriate for shuttle assisted downhill runs and wonder what I'm doing on it! I'll freely admit that there are many riders that can out ride me on way less bike. But that doesn't mean they are on the correct bike.

    For the trails I ride, I feel the Solo or the Bronson and the bikes in those categories are correct for the application. If you conserve energy on the XC smooth parts of the trail getting ready for the drops and obstacles, lean more towards the Bronson. If absolute speed overall is your forte, and since we all take more time on the ascends than the descends, then something with less travel is going to be more to your liking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fontarin View Post
    I ride most everything with a 120f/100r Pivot 429C. No real need for a bigger bike for anything I've found in TX (though I've demo'd a Mach 6 at both CP and Greenbelt and as a 2nd bike, it'd be awesome).
    I demo's a 429c at Brushy Creek and almost broke myself due to the steeper head angle. I've been riding a bike with a 66.5 degree head angle and when I got on that one with the 70.5, I endo'd more than once on drops that I normally don't think twice about. It climbed like a beast and was fast as shit, but the steep xc style head angle was way too steep for my tastes. It was twitchy on longer downhills and I tended to oversteer to compensate. I'll take the Mach 4 even though I prefer wagon wheels in Austin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMentallo View Post
    I demo's a 429c at Brushy Creek and almost broke myself due to the steeper head angle. I've been riding a bike with a 66.5 degree head angle and when I got on that one with the 70.5, I endo'd more than once on drops that I normally don't think twice about. It climbed like a beast and was fast as shit, but the steep xc style head angle was way too steep for my tastes. It was twitchy on longer downhills and I tended to oversteer to compensate. I'll take the Mach 4 even though I prefer wagon wheels in Austin.
    I run a 120 fork, which slackens it a bit (69.3 I think it was). Short stem, wide bars. I'd imagine it would take some getting used to going from a bigger travel 66ish HA though. Mach 4 isn't much slacker, really. Funny thing is, the 429C is roughly the same as bigger travel bikes on the HA - the RIP9, Stumpy, and Fuel EX are all around the same HA as the Pivot.

    If I wanted one do-it-all bike in Austin, I'd get something with a 68ish HA and about 120-140 travel like a Remedy or Turner Burner. If I traveled a good bit too, I'd get something 150ish like a Bronson or Mach 6.

  29. #29
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    I'm thinking of building a Titus El Guapo 29. The frames are around $550 with a Monarch out back. 140mm travel with a 68 HA. 4 bar rear and you can drop the rocker position for a lower bb and around a half a degree slacker head angle. I've rented a Remedy in 29 before and you are right, a 140mm travel bike with wagon wheels and modern long top tube and short chainstay geometry is the way to go here.

  30. #30
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    When I was doing my demo tour of bikes, CP was my testing trail. I rode it a shit ton, have it memorized.

    I ended up getting a Devinci Troy 27.5. 150/140 travel, works great out there and everywhere else. For my riding style, this is about as perfect as it gets. I ride aggressively, so I needed something with some travel, was quick and could climb. You know, the unicorn bike. The Troy is that. My only complaint is that I wish the BB was a bit higher, which is the opposite of what bike companies are doing.

    I think the BB height is something to really pay attention to if you're building a bike with CP in mind. If it's too low, you're going to get rock strikes all day, which makes climbing more challenging than it needs to be. You add maybe a 1/4 of an inch, and that goes a long way towards a better climbing experience. Besides, the low BB is supposed to aid you in high speed situations, lowering your center of gravity. In Austin, we don't have a whole lot of high speed situations. We have steep, rocky situations. Thousands of them.

    I tested a Banshee Spitfire and it was a fantastic bike. Climbed like a goat and just killed the downs. The version I tested was a 26, but they put new dropouts on the back and turned it into a 27.5. Since they didn't change the frame geometry, this gave it an extra 3/4 inch of BB clearance, which was stellar for the climbs. I think I had two or three rock strikes out at CP all day. That bike was number two on my list.

    Anyway, I guess the point of this rant is
    1. To brag on my Devinci Troy, which you can buy from Wes at
    velorangutan.com

    2. pay attention to BB height.

    3. Make sure you drink plenty of water. If you don't, you won't poop regularly, and that doesn't feel good.

  31. #31
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