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  1. #1
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    Snakes are out

    The weather is warming up and so are the snakes. This little guy was at the Brindley trail in Sugarland.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Snakes are out-snake.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Copperhead, right? Haven't seen one of those in decades.

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    That's not the kind of snake you want to run into while out riding!

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    Aww man.....I hate snakes. At one point last summer I was running into one on the singletrack 1-3 times per ride. They scare the _____ out of me, especially when they're mad and rattling and you're riding alone. Rolling over them on the track messes with your head too...hard to shake the nervous feeling for the rest of the ride =) Oh well...warm weather is worth it.

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    Not a copperhead. Looks like a common water snake. Non venomous but they'll still give you a good sting when they strike. Copperheads on the other hand will give you much worse.

    http://www.texassnakes.net/DiamondBacked.htm
    If you ever see a turtle on a telephone pole, remember he had help getting there. Is there anything beer can't do?

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    I'm no herpetologist, and like I said, I haven't seen a copperhead live and in the flesh in nearly two decades, but that sure looks like a pit viper with the markings of a copperhead.

    I know the watersnake you're talking about, and the above does not remind me of one. The head doesn't look right.

  7. #7
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    I live on lake Travis in Austin and run into the water snakes on my dock from time to time. I actually "saved one" that got his head stuck inside a beer can. The pic above looks more like one of these (Cottonmouth) which come in many shades.



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    The two snakes are very similar except for the head. A mocassin/cottonmouth has a big diamond shaped head while the water snake has a flat, small head. Typically, cottonmouth don't grow as long but are much fatter. Hard to say for sure since you can't get a great look at the head in the picture. MS where I hail from is infested with moccasins.
    If you ever see a turtle on a telephone pole, remember he had help getting there. Is there anything beer can't do?

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAKESNAKE
    I live on lake Travis in Austin and run into the water snakes on my dock from time to time. I actually "saved one" that got his head stuck inside a beer can. The pic above looks more like one of these (Cottonmouth) which come in many shades.



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    Hard to tell the 1st one without a good pic of the head. However this young guy is awesome. check out the green tail....a yearling and ready to go. watch out frogs, lizards and small birds.

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    I thought it looked like a juvenile cottonmouth due to the shape and prominent head. It wasn't aggressive when I moved it off the trail with a stick and I didn't get a look at it's tail (I was more focused in the biting end)! Kids were coming along the trail behind me and I didn't want them getting hit.

    I did a little image searching and some of the attached links show similar coloring and patterns. The darn things do look similar to water snakes.

    http://www.wf.net/~snake/moccasin.htm

    http://www.google.com/images?q=water...w=1280&bih=597

  11. #11
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    This is an educational thread.

    All the cottonmouths I'd ever seen were solid-colored ... usually black or dark gray. I had no idea juvenile cottonmouths were banded like copperheads and had a "fishing worm" of a tail. Fascinating.

    The picture in the OP isn't detailed enough to be conclusive, but the shape of the jaw seems suggestive of a pit viper. I remember watersnakes having more of a diamond/checkered pattern than banded, but maybe there are variants. After all, Texas is a mighty big state.

    Oh, and for the curious, I'm posting here because I spent the first 30 years of my life in Texas and was curious as to the goings on there. I didn't start mountain biking until I moved to Idaho. In hindsight, I wish I'd been doing it all my life.

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    Aw Son Of A Muther!!!,...I hate snakes! Poisonous or Not,..I hate'um.
    I totally forgot it was time for the devil's tongue to slither out again.

    What do yall think Pepper Spray would do to them?

  13. #13
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    Lol, if you hate snakes, whatcha doing in Texas?

    Lots of snakes are considered aggressive when in fact, they are quite the opposite. I've run across a number of snakes that people have told me are aggressive, and have been unable to confirm.

    I find that many nonvenomous snakes tend to be much more ill-tempered than the venomous ones.

  14. #14
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    Better start working on your bunny hopping skills. I hate snakes and I dont even want my tires to touch em.
    -It's time to shred some mild to moderate gnar!! :cornut:

  15. #15
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    no shyte---wouldn't want any snake bites on the tire

    Quote Originally Posted by texasnavy05
    Better start working on your bunny hopping skills. I hate snakes and I dont even want my tires to touch em.

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    Damn Copperheads, they will chase you and make you scream like a school girl! Ask me how I know...

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithrad
    Damn Copperheads, they will chase you and make you scream like a school girl! Ask me how I know...

    How do you know?
    -It's time to shred some mild to moderate gnar!! :cornut:

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    Here's a good example of how well a copperhead blends in. Check out the thread below from a Memphis, TN forum.

    http://midsouthtrails.com/phpBB3/vie...php?f=9&t=3859
    If you ever see a turtle on a telephone pole, remember he had help getting there. Is there anything beer can't do?

  19. #19
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    i was out there a week ago or so and saw 2 snakes on the trail. keep the lookout 0_0

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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Lol, if you hate snakes, whatcha doing in Texas?

    Lots of snakes are considered aggressive when in fact, they are quite the opposite. I've run across a number of snakes that people have told me are aggressive, and have been unable to confirm.

    I find that many nonvenomous snakes tend to be much more ill-tempered than the venomous ones.
    Man ,..believe me,.I'd love to move somewhere up north where I can really enjoy some cold weather. But yeah,..Texas has two things for sure,..Snakes and Humid Heat!

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckie33
    Here's a good example of how well a copperhead blends in. Check out the thread below from a Memphis, TN forum.

    http://midsouthtrails.com/phpBB3/vie...php?f=9&t=3859
    Wow, it really blends in. .That's not good...for me as a biker. The thing I like about rattlesnakes (about the only kind of snake I see around here) is that they announce their presence most of the time, so I have enough time to pedal or run away really fast like a scared little boy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasnavy05
    How do you know?
    More of a rhetorical question, however I had one chase me down my driveway, until it slithered away! My son came out of the house thinking my 10 year old daughter was making the rukus. No sir I don't care for 'em..

    I have encountered a few snakes; baby rattler, copperheads, western hog nosed, rat snakes and mocassins ( one while carrying my bike through the river ) on the trail and try to avoid them. But one guy was stretched out across the trail on a climb, just after a left turn, around a root exposed Oak tree.By the time I saw him there I could only manage to wheelie my front tire over him, but rolled over him with my back tire. I felt bad for him, I don't think it killed him as he moved on into the bush, but i'm sure he was sore! I like to live and let live!
    Last edited by keithrad; 03-01-2011 at 07:49 AM.

  23. #23
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    Copperheads

    FYI, all the photos you guys have posted are of cottonmouths - notice the side markings and the horizontal stripe on the head are the same.

    Was clearing brush last week behind the house and pulled back a pile of leaves to reveal a sleepy rattlesnake. Thank Jeebus it was still drowsy and slow. In the past 2 years we've had 3 coral snakes in our backyard and 2 in the neighbor's. Not like we're in the country either - we live down by Mary Moore Seawright Park.

    Here in Austin we generally only have to worry about rattlers, copperheads, coral snakes, and cottonmouths. Here's a handy guide to identify them:

    • Rattlesnakes - all sorts of markings; typically have a rattle but sometimes not due to loss or young age; will still shake their tail at you when threatened
    • Copperheads - very aggressive; will chase you if threatened; side markings look like Hershey's Kisses
    • Coral snakes - red/yellow/black bandings (sometimes confused with the milk snake - just remember "red next to yellow, kill a fellow - red next to black, friend of Jack"); small teeth not fangs; have to gnaw on bare flesh for a while to inject venom; very shy; typically come in pairs; not that dangerous to humans but watch your pets; no antivenin available in the Austin area at this time
    • Cottonmouths - known for dark bodies and white mouths; usually found around water; large and heavy snake


    Remember that all snakes swim and like to do so. Best way to determine Central Texas poisonous snakes from non is to:

    (1) look at the head - if it's wider at the jaws then it has fangs and, thus, poisonous

    (2) look for a rattle - not a great indicator, though (sometimes they lose them or haven't developed a rattle yet and rattlesnakes w/o a rattle will still shake their tail at you if they feel threatened)

    (3) if it opens its mouth at you and you see fangs, back away from it rapidamente

    Hope this helps.

  24. #24
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    Some reference photos...

    Here are some reference photos for you. Left to right are a copperhead, coral snake vs. milk snake, cottonmouth, and rattlesnake.
    Attached Images Attached Images     

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    Forgot to mention another sometimes reliable indicator is tail shape; if it's long, thin, and comes to a sharp point it's likely not venomous - if it's shorter, thicker, and rounder at the end then it's likely poisonous

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdparrish
    This is an educational thread.

    All the cottonmouths I'd ever seen were solid-colored ... usually black or dark gray. I had no idea juvenile cottonmouths were banded like copperheads and had a "fishing worm" of a tail. Fascinating.

    The picture in the OP isn't detailed enough to be conclusive, but the shape of the jaw seems suggestive of a pit viper. I remember watersnakes having more of a diamond/checkered pattern than banded, but maybe there are variants. After all, Texas is a mighty big state.

    Oh, and for the curious, I'm posting here because I spent the first 30 years of my life in Texas and was curious as to the goings on there. I didn't start mountain biking until I moved to Idaho. In hindsight, I wish I'd been doing it all my life.
    You're correct; typically cottonmouths do have large, dark bodies as they age, however their markings are quite distinct as juveniles and just after shedding.

  27. #27
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    Coral snakes do have fangs, but they're towards the back of the mouth instead of the front like pit vipers. Worth noting - coral snake antivenin is not made anymore because of the rarity of people getting bitten by them. It just wasn't cost-effective to make anymore. So unless you're a special kind of dumb, you probably don't have to worry about them. Just be able to tell them apart from their nonvenomous counterparts, and don't try to pick them up.

    Many reptiles get melanistic as they age (darkening pigment). It's worth noting because people may focus on the markings that get obscured and they ignore the markings that remain (like Kronk mentioned about the stripe on the head of the cottonmouths).

    I saw a big timber rattler a couple of years ago. It was the highlight of my day, because they're pretty rare. Looked like a downed branch on the dirt road I was on.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckie33
    Not a copperhead. Looks like a common water snake. Non venomous but they'll still give you a good sting when they strike. Copperheads on the other hand will give you much worse.

    http://www.texassnakes.net/DiamondBacked.htm

    nope, that's definitely a young cottonmouth.

    and lol @ all the snake haters. if you get bitten by a snake on a bike ride, either you ate ***** and flew into the bushes and scared the sleeping snake, or you were messing with the snake when you should've known better.

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