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  1. #1
    Devo
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    its a Pug's life

    so they say nothing but rain, rain, rain. well, i think its great. to top it off, it aint even cold. temps seem to be hovering around 60F.
    the bead on one of the Endo's started to tear away from the casing so i had to replace it. i was amazed to see the difference between a new tyre and the old one. The Pug has been in almost constant service since Oct, and the tyres show the milage.
    i took off the rack and panniers, cleaned up the Pug, took off for the day to run around town, do errands, get Mexi food, etc.
    it aint single track, save for tmrrw or so, but instead its the commuter life in the drizzle. Splashing gutters, bunny hop curbs, get coffee, messanger bag, with laptop. How yuppie could it get?
    aint got to count calories, watch diet, measure anything, just ride, hang out, and ride some more.
    let it rain.

    peace.........d
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  2. #2
    Obi
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    ... and if we just ... Right on!!

    Thanks for posting this here. Keep the updates rolling!

    Also, shoot some pics of the old vs. new tire, I'm curious how well they wear out.
    ~Especially under your kind of daily use.

    Obi..
    Last edited by Obi; 10-21-2006 at 05:13 PM.

  3. #3
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    The endos look like they wear out quickly due to the lack of a tread. I have kept my endos as a snow only tire. I'm still using my pugs year round, but once the snow melted, I switched to some DH tires. I have some Kenda 2.7s that I'm running. Interestingly enough, the bead isn't quite wide enough for the rim, so the tire has a slight gap between the rim and the bead. I hope it will stretch a little bit to fit in there, but I'm not too worried.

    If you do this, I would recommend the Nokian Gazzaloddi 3.0 tire. I'm a little concerned that the 2.7 tire isn't quite large enough. Right now the rim and the inflated tire are the same width and I worry about damaging the rim by hitting a rock or other trail obstacle.

    Chris

  4. #4
    Devo
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    pug's life

    i was talking with a buddy, and we think the pugz got about 3K miles on it by now. its been my daily bike since Oct.
    the tyre in question wasnt all that trashed. the issue was that bead started to seperate, and that worried me.
    when the PSI is low, it seems the tyre wears faster.
    if there were a "wish" i suppose it would be a lighter tube/tyre combo. but then again.
    its a PUG.
    thats how it is.
    peace....d
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  5. #5
    Devo
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    some pics

    local scene
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  6. #6
    Devo
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    more pug pics

    sunny cali what can i say. it aint snow, it aint goin somewhere far away. instead its every day, and this is my locale.
    peace......d
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  7. #7
    Devo
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    2xNice Rack 1xMod Hack

    So i finally got that front rack mounted up. I copied the mod from the thread listed below:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=200784

    All in all, it seems really strong and it really wasnt that much of a project. I sat and pondered keeping more of the rack intact, but ultimately decided to hack it complete as per the above mentioned thread. In reality, the "rear" section of the Surly rear Nice Rack that i removed could have remained intact. No issues with wheel clearance. I just like the way it looks with the complete hack job. (oh the vanity)
    The panniers were able to be mated up, and now it seems like the Pug should be primed for dayz on the ramble.
    Maybe I'll get the rear pannier set, but 1st im gonna see what this set up is like.
    After almost 9months the Pug is now outfitted.
    peace...d
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  8. #8

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    Can anyone speak to the benefits of running geared on a pugs as oppossed to a single speed? Thank you.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by toddk
    Can anyone speak to the benefits of running geared on a pugs as oppossed to a single speed? Thank you.
    I ride up and down the coast here on the beach and a single speed would be pretty much unrideable in the deep sand.

    Some days there is a 20 knot wind in your face in one direction; combined with the deep sand, you are forced into a 22x30 to make forward motion. On the way back with the wind behind you, a 32x15 is usually about right.

    Maybe for trail riding or just bumming around, a single speed would be OK.
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  10. #10
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by toddk
    Can anyone speak to the benefits of running geared on a pugs as oppossed to a single speed? Thank you.
    Gears give a wider range of gear inches. So you can crawl, or go fast.
    For me...every day I'm running it with a 44x12T and often have wished to use a compact road crank with a 34x50T combined with a 32x11t cogset.
    In the winter around here, i found the Pug to totally haul ass on wet pave with all the pine needles, debris etc. I was running it without the racks, and panniers. With the rear tyre pumped up around 20psi(ish) and the front a bit below 15psi(ish) i found i can push the descents faster than i have on anyother bike. Plus it transitions into the dirt really well. Which is a unique niche that it fills.
    For quite some time i had been taking it out weekly on group road rides too. Taking a pull at the front of a group, you simply need the gear to go fast enough.

    On the other side of the coin, I'm using the racks these days, got the panniers mounted up, and have been riding by myself. Having the low gears to crawl along with the load, and going in places that typically a bicycle wouldnt venture...well...having the granny gear is pretty damn nice.
    Today i was doing a little bit of exploring b4 work, got the panniers loaded, nothing on the decks on the racks yet, lowered the psi, and crawled around some. The combo of the Thudbuster seatpost, all the weight (yes! a Pug starts puttin on the weight! I think mine is 38lbs w/o racks), the lower psi, big disc brakes, and a firm hand at the bars...well...its a unique experience. Im still always amazed at what i can ride up, over, down, etc. Those big tyres, not only wide, but the outside diameter = foot print, they really make for remarkable capability. Today i traversed a section of fireroad, with a huge rut at the shoulder and simply rode over it, lofted the front wheel (with rack and panniers) up a 2ft+(ish) ledge to access a dear track that lead into a forested area. did a small loop thru the area, and exited in the same area.

    I havent used my Pug as a SS yet. Of course i have a couple of SS bikes too. The thing i could see would be good with the Pug is obvisoulsy to use 2 different size cogs. One on each wheel right? Make sure the rotors are the same size, or simply use cantis.
    As a SS i think the Pug would be awesome. Its just that in this configuration, its intended application would be more specific, its range of use more limited.
    With gears the Pug can be more effectively used in a wider range of conditions.
    A SS Pug would be great for the snow, wet conditions, or maybe a commited sand bike. Very unique for sure.
    I also think it would make for a pimp townie bike as SS.
    obviously SS makes for less maitenance and there is something smooth and magical about having that perfectly straight chain line, no pullys to spin round and round.

    rain and mud are the worst my Pug sees. Im on the beach some too, and i kind of cringe at the thought of saltwater washing over all the bling (KC hubs, etc) so i try to treat it nice when its at the beach.
    with that said...
    recently i rode sand with the rear rack and panniers. I managed to stand up a couple of times and use the big ring, but for the most part, im running 32x32t, or dropping into the granny (22t, i think) and dropping down a 2 or 3 cogs. Sand seems to necesitate that grannygear.

    peace......d
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by toddk
    Can anyone speak to the benefits of running geared on a pugs as oppossed to a single speed? Thank you.
    Mine is set up as a "dinglespeed" (2 chainrings and 2 sprockets) as it's mostly used on the local beaches and I wanted something that was simple, light(er!) and easy to wash the sand off. I got Surly stainless steel chainrings and their steel sprockets on a PlanetX single-speed freehub that will take 2-3 splined sprockets, not a freewheel. The other wheel has a Surly hub with a freewheel.
    The sram PC58 8-speed chain has a link you can break without a tool, so I take the chain off and clean it in turps and re-oil every few sand rides. A five minute job.

    I use 32\20T most of the time which is perfect for deep sand and on singletrack I can keep up with geared bikes but on faster stuff like gravel fireroads (or on the road) it's way undergeared.

    I am getting a rack and panniers shortly and it may be a bit of a struggle pushing more weight with one gear but you can always get a twin ratio freewheel or swap wheels (lower ratio freewheel on front wheel).

    My Pugs is for cruising around and exploring, and I'm loving it. I am seldom in a hurry.

    If you want to go fast, or ride a lot in the hills, go geared.

  12. #12
    Devo
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    Pug takes R&R

    The Pug has been put aside for awhile to make way for an Xtracycle. What! True.
    For the last month or so, the Pug has been just sitting around, while i've been putting an Xtra thru the paces of daily life.
    My conversion of choice is my 2000 Cdale F900.
    Added 203mm rotors front and rear, and a set of Mavic Speedcitys with a Kenda 35c CX tyres.

    The thing with the Xtra is that is has MEGA-VOLUME, and can carry a passanger. In fact it has so much capacity to cary stuff, it hauls a BOB with ease! However the thing that i dont like about it is...its almost impossible to bunny hop, do a wheelie, or simply loft the front wheel to get over a curb. Slow speeds, its "mostly" possible, but really when it comes down to it, at speed running around town, etc, getting over a curb is a hazard. I was really surprised to find how much i unweight the front wheel in daily life.

    so for now the Pug sits. Maybe I'll get another set of panniers for it. I've been thinking about getting a rear set (about 900cu inches more).

    peace..........d
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  13. #13
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    lifting front wheel on xtracycle

    lifting the front wheel up stuff on an xtracycle is sort-of like doing a bunnyhop on a 'normal sized' bike, the length of the bike just keeps the back wheel on the ground,
    to bunny hop the xtracycle you have to really lean into it

  14. #14
    Devo
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    my website

    Asana Cycles aka: Self Propelled Devo
    this is me...
    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles/iWeb/Site/Welcome.html
    peace......d
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  15. #15
    Devo
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  16. #16
    Obi
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    Good job!

    If you have yet to forward this to the Surly Crew, I am right now...nice vid!!

  17. #17
    Devo
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    thanks...you know, i didnt even think of it.
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  18. #18
    Devo
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    well, i couldn't stand it another moment. Being that i rent a loft, i basically live with my bikes. Every day i look over to see the Pug just sittin, and i say to myself, "i should ride the pug today." but somehow, i'm grabing a different bike.
    today was the day.
    then i asked myself..."why do i ride anything else?" Oh so nice to be back on the big-ol-Pug. Complete pannier set, i took my iBook into work and i reflect how incredibly yuppie i've become. Next i'll be ditching the Suunto on the bar for a Panerai. Oh god! (thats just too rediculous. i have limits)
    its obvious why i switch out bikes. I've come to learn that its nice to keep things fresh. For about a week i was riding around on my Salsa Moto Rapido with crossmax, etc. and what an incredibly fast thing that bike is. Oh and last week i even took out my Fondriest complete with Zipps. Now that thing is stupid fast!
    at anyrate...im glad to be back on the pug.

    peace.......d
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  19. #19
    Devo
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    on the way to work today, i ride thru the forest, and come across some guys working, and they just kind of frown (well that was the tone in their voices) at me, i stop use my typical "friendly/concerned guy, asset to the community" approach. Lately there has a been a small arson spree going on. so i guess anyone is suspect. I had to laff to myself as i was reading into their body language, that at any moment i was subject to an anti-bike spew. However the crew started to comment on the Pug, the racks, the panniers, the big-ol-tyres, and its obvious that i aint out to build a trails course, go North Shore style hucking, bomb DH style, but rather i was simply going to work. What finished off the "friendly guy on a eco-friendly bike" was when i told them..."in the winter, when im running the psi way down, its footprint on the ground is lighter than a boot print." When one of the older guys chimes in sayin, "ya...I've seen those tracks, and i was wonderin what it was." So i asked him of his opinion of the impact. Basically this guy was sayin that he noticed that it was helping smooth things.
    Now there is this section that i typically ride, and its really a mix of sand and clay. Horses use this area a bunch and once its muddy, it gets all chopped up. I roll the Pug over this slippery mess and i try to take a bit of a different line every day, with smoothing out this double track/small fireroad in mind.
    so today i manage to escape an anti-bike campain and in fact...it was an upshot for those of us on 2 wheels. Albiet it helps to volutarily produce I.D., express interest/concern for our local environ, etc.
    peac.....d
    Last edited by SelfPropelledDevo; 08-18-2006 at 10:28 AM.
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  20. #20
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    its a Pug's life for sure...

    the one thing that never seems to fade away, are the moments when im on my bike. somehow, just pedaling, the breath in rhythm, and my body just does its thing. my mind is empty, my brain is empty, and i just do what is natural. gently lift the front wheel over some roots, bunny hop a rut, shift, brake, pedal, pull on the bars, and the world just passes by.
    More times that i can recollect, the hours, the miles, the days, the weeks, yes...the years...have passed by under those pedals. when i get to work, or get home, i always lafff to myself when i “click” back to the “prescribed reality”. As if I were transported, one moment i was “not on the bike”, then i was on the bike, and again...back to “not on the bike”. the in between, sure i go thru a process where i download and process my thoughts, but its pretty quick, and then there is simply nothing. Just my natural mind.
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  21. #21
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    Pug and Ferraris

    It was Concours weekend here in Monterey. Friday night after work I rolled thru downtown, rode around a bit, watched the cars rolling by at midnight going up for auction. the peeps equally entertaining, a woman in a cling tight black and white stripped short dress, heals, i assume breast implants, as the guys flock all around her. I couldn’t figure out what car she was associated with or what her deal was. she’d hold onto the arm of an older gentleman, then he’d grow tired of her, she’d drift less than 20ft away and flirt with the younger gentlemen.
    the smell of alcohol in the air, cigars, men stumbling around with their women in arm, as they basically escort/guide the men along, all done in short skirts/dresses and heals. I have to admire the social skill and physical agility of these women.
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  22. #22
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    [QUOTE=SelfPropelledDevo]It was Concours weekend here in Monterey. QUOTE]

    Dude, that is one of the best pictures I have seen. Makes me laugh. I like to laugh.

  23. #23
    Devo
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    encouragement? i couldnt help myself...
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  24. #24
    Devo
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    media....

    media....cool....
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  25. #25
    Devo
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    Pug Asana

    today’s commute to work totaled about 3hrs of ride time. I can get to work in about 20 minutes if i have to, but what fun is that? so today, it was out to send more bike parts off. thank you eBay! I am starting to experience a catharsis as all my old stuff ships off into...the wild blue yander. why do i grasp to all this junk i have laying around? ego and desire of course. my mind has been crazy, obsessed with buying stuff, this and that, all the bike parts laying around. How many tyres do i have? Oh my god! a life time supply. And i just rent a loft with a meager storage area. I can only imagine how i’d be with a house, a garage, etc. pure insanity for sure. the only rationale i can come up with is that its a mechanism developed from the days when my life was unstable. the days of life with Dad in the van living on Rincon, those days in the Army, etc. unstable, and to make up for it, i’ve pack ratted stuff away. well...I’m over it!
    ya over it! like im over feeling like i had to prove something to myself. the years of racing, chasing some crazy elusive goal. as if i were still in the Army, and having done my missions in Panama wasn’t enough. As if racing 24hr solo wasn’t enough. Well it was! enough. nothing to prove. the center of my universe is the bottom bracket. we know this. that is THE primary root of Asana.
    The Pug Asana is to listen to your body and mind. its heft automatically tells you when you are working too hard. Fatigue comes on much faster. the unlimited possibilities of places to ride, opens the mind. As long as you throttle down, take it a little bit easier, and enjoy things, life on the pug is for the long haul and nothing seems to phase this method. Pug Asana is supreme. Only having 1 small water bottle of just water, and an empty stomach, 3hrs on the Pug going all over paradise, produced a nice sublime post ride euphoria. needles to say work was a breeze.
    today i rode a section of beach that i had never thought about. my commute route took me on and of pave, thru the forest, and up and up and up, until i got to work just in the nick of time to change and clock in exactly on time. It couldn’t have been any better. PERFECT.

    peace......d
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  26. #26
    Devo
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    Pug Sur

    Pug goes south...
    i just got back from a little 3 day trip with the Pug, when i got home, it weighs 86lbs. thats minus 3 days of rations. The Pug goes like nothing i've ever owned before. Stream crossing? no problem. it goes anywhere a person has the strenght to motor it. My second day i rode from 9am to 7pm, and that was with the psi way down, as i was mostly in the dirt, with only a bit of pave upon arrival to my last camping spot of the day.

    enjoy the pics.........
    peace...........d
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  27. #27
    Devo
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    Pug skill...

    Its been almost a full year now that i've been on the Pug. In a simple word, "Amazing". it took a few months to get the front rack situation squared away. that is...what rack to use, how to modify it, what panniers to mount, etc.

    this 3 day trip i just took was really the maiden trip for its ultimate intentions. that being...the uber hobo-mobile/dharma bum life.

    obviously the major factor are the tyres. when pumped up at 30psi and hauling all of 90lbs(ish) on the road it rolls amazingly well. or maybe its just that i've become amazingly accoustomed to the Pug. its taken a year to work up to it, and i dont consider myself a total wuss or a total jock either. i've raced some 24hr solo races, placed 4th a couple of times, im a Army vet, combat vet, Jungle School, Air Assualt, etc etc. blah blah blah. I've done a bunch of road stuff too, a few double centuries, crits, etc. Ok...so im sayin im familiar with bikes. and the Pug has taken me about a year to settle into. A courtship of unique proportions, for sure!

    back to the tyres. with my weight 180lbs + 90lbs(ish) of bike = 270(ish) goin down the road, the fire road, beach, trail, single track, stream crossings, or simply making way to new territory. The key really is the psi. and even at 90lbs of bike amazingly i am able to loft the front wheel to get up onto/over things like small logs, ledges, and to traverse strange rut formations.

    With all the weight comes MOMEMTUM! ya...with that said...you also have to really watch what you are doing. on the pave @ almost 300lbs its easy to get going 40mph and that my friends, you really need to be cognitive of exactly what you are doing. Are you going to bunny hop a 90lb bike? uhhh....probably not. so beware. special attention to the BRAKES. at this point its really appropriate to bring on board all those motorcycle defensive riding skills.

    At one point i did a descent that totalled to about 1000ft. my Suunto said i was descending at a rate of 20-60ft/min. Im using Avid mech discs with a 203mm polygon rotor up front, and a 185mm rotor in the rear, laced up to CK 36H 4cross wheels with brass nipples. I've never once questioned the strength of the wheels. the brake pads, Im using EBC Gold pads. At the bottom of the descent i could feel the heat coming off of the rotors. thats not reaching down to find the heat. That was coming to a stop and just noticing the heat pouring up. the fork was warm, as was the frame at the rear wheel.

    On another note, the famous "Pugsley crawl" with that same weight is a huge amount of energy. Well...huge in the world of bicycles. witht that much momentum things that typically stop a traditional bicycle, the Pug with its squishy tyres, just rolls over. so things like miles of wild beach, with rocks the size of cantelope, softballs, babyheads, whatever you call them, with slick mossy stuff, and of course sand all around, the Pug has this dispostion you soon learn. That is...constant even power input, and basically point and shoot. Running both brakes in conjunction with pedaling provides added feedback to the rider. That is...you'd be surprised how practical it is to "bunch the bike up" and make it dig in, or preload it for mini launches up/over/thru stuff. Another added method is to "studder" skid the rear tyre, while pedaling, to feel exactly how much "studder" you are using when making turns on those slippery rocks. a low tech kind of anti lock braking. all of this im sure is standard operating procedure for those in the rock crawling world of 4WD.

    while my bike weighed in at a whooping 90lbs, its only 90lbs. that is...in the world of "bike handling skills" its not like tryn to wrastle a motorbike. Not that i've ever had the experience of dumping a BMW GS in a creekbed, sometimes i have those notions of that new yuppie $23k GS1200 Adventure. the pug's big brother, i guess. it all a mater of perspective. you'd be wise to keep a firm grip on the bars, and to keep strong thru the rough stuff.

    At times i've actually entertained the notion of a steering dampner. what? i think its just a bit too much, but maybe not. im sure someone out there in the world would want one on their Pug. Instead I've opted for a new Soma Morning Rush coffee cup holder! stainless steel, thermally insulated, with a cool clicky lid to boot.

    If i were totaly onboard with the Pug methodology I'd put a set of Jones H-bars on it. But i've grown so fond of my 06' Sram trigger shifters that i bawk when i read on the Jones website that they do not recomend using "trigger shifters". So for now, I've got a pair of Cane Creek Ergo Control II Bar Ends sitting aside this laptop to mount to my Pug which will compliment the Thudbuster. thudbuster on a Pug?

    uuhhhh....ya...a Thudbuster! As if the tyres werent cush enough? well....uhhh...no. lol
    the gig is with the Thudbuster is that it gives you the ability to be on the bike all day. and i do mean all day. I first fell in love this funny seatpost racing 24hr solo. what a god send! contrary to other suspension seatposts, the thudbuster doesnt change your leg length. the motion is a rearward and then down motion. someone has definately done their homework when this product was designed. To the crew at Cane Creek, a big thanks!

    On the practicle note, a little tip with a bicycle of this size and the use of Avid mech discs, i've grown into the practice of simply closing the calipers via the red dial adjusters when I get off the bike. This stabalizes the bike. it prevents it from rolling off that tree you just leaned it against, it deters bike theives, annoys your friends, and steadies the bike while loading the panniers, rack et al.

    all in all...the Pug is one heck of a companion. Companion? can that term be applied to inanimate objects? well...in my confused world, im giving it a go.

    The Pug compared to the Xtracycle...well...the Xtra is good for hauling those strange large volume loads, like a mini fridge, ladder, R/C gliders, case of sodas (not that i do that too often, thank god) and i love not having to fuss with bucking and zipping panniers all the time. But my vote goes to the Pug by default of its versatility in terrain. Just the simple fact of not being able to wheelie the Xtra up over a curb annoys me. will i give up my Xtra? No way. Is it sitting? Yup. As i mentioned it has its uses.

    peace........d
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  28. #28
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    Sounds awesome.

  29. #29
    Devo
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    stipped down, run around town

    I've been back in town, doing my regular work routine. the other day i took the racks and panniers off the Pug, swapped out the bar ends for some Can Creek ones, and the Thudbuster keeps developing a really anoying creak, so i took it off. replaced it with on of the mega-bike-parts stuff layin around, flite saddle and Salsa Shaft seatpost.
    Pumped up the tyres to 30psi, and now im jaming around town, down hills, just plain-ol-haulin a$$ around. crazy fun. back to life living out of my Chrome Kremlin messenger bag.
    funny how that is, one day im all stoked to have gucci saddle bags, the next glad to have the Kremlin. im just glad to keep it fresh. it never really seems to get old.
    peace.....d
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  30. #30
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    What happened to the Thudbuster?
    Love that bike, can't wait to get one some day...

  31. #31
    Devo
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    the thudbuster keeps developing an annoying creak/squeak about every week. I take it apart, grease things up, and as weird as it sounds, Phil Wood Tenacious oil works best to rid the noise, but it comes back in about a week. so for now, im too lazy to deal with it. Cane creek crew told me to use some white grease. I've been using it for about a year solid now, and i've taken it apart 2 or 3 times in the last couple of months. it never made noise before.
    i have an older version of the seatpost on another bike, and i spent 1.5yrs playing hobo joe on it, and it never gave me a problem, so when i built the Pug i put on the new version.
    im sure i just need to mess with it.
    just too lazy at this point.
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    Awesome...Devo, suggestion!

    The rig is look'in great...and looks at though you're' putting her through her paces...nice!

    I'm off on an ocean tour de'Pug myself soon and will postup soon!

    IMHO - you need a frame-bag for Miss Pugs...its the ideal way to center your heavier weight / items and improves the overall ride and touring perfomance. Take some center-load off the wheels mate.

    Check out Wildfire's bags...standard issue in Alaska:

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinleonard/244268999/" title="Photo Sharing"><img src="https://static.flickr.com/86/244268999_66271600de_m.jpg" width="240" height="174" alt="Frame Bag" /></a>

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinleonard/244269072/" title="Photo Sharing"><img src="https://static.flickr.com/86/244269072_8956244b86_m.jpg" width="153" height="240" alt="Frame Bag Oblique" /></a>


    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    Pug goes south...
    i just got back from a little 3 day trip with the Pug, when i got home, it weighs 86lbs. thats minus 3 days of rations. The Pug goes like nothing i've ever owned before. Stream crossing? no problem. it goes anywhere a person has the strenght to motor it. My second day i rode from 9am to 7pm, and that was with the psi way down, as i was mostly in the dirt, with only a bit of pave upon arrival to my last camping spot of the day.

    enjoy the pics.........
    peace...........d
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  33. #33
    Devo
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    you are right. I've been thinking about the frame bag gig. But i actually use my water bottles too. typically when i ride out of town, i 4xstrenght powder Gatorade in the bottles, which lasts be about 3 days, then i just add water when needed. So my camelbak, i just fill with filtered water from the MSR pump. I take a sip of 4xGatorade, and a slug of water from the camelbak.
    of course there is the typical usage of the H20 bladder around the camp site to make food, tea, etc.
    but what i really want to get for the winter, is one of those handlebar mits. Where do i get that?! I'd love to have one for the winter. Here in Monterey, on occasion it will get below 40F, some hail, but mostly just cold rain. I've got plenty of jackets, etc, but what i really battle is keeping my hands and feet warm.
    the feet thing, i typically end up going thru 2 sets of booties thru the winter, but i plan on using an old Endomorph, cut the tread out, and sew it to the bottom of a set of Kuchirik(sp) booties.
    basically my feet always get wet, but the booties always seem to keep the heat in. Feet may be wet, but they are still warm.
    Hands...well, that is a different story. They get wet, then they get cold. in driving rain, my rides are seriously limited, and as the nature of weather patterns go, it rains, then clears up.
    so i think a handlebar mit would extend the duration i can spend out of doors, cuz of course, i'd rather not be indoors.
    thanks for the input.
    peace......d
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  34. #34
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    Pacific Grove to New Brighton State Beach, up and around Forest of Niessene Marks

    my computer crashed as soon as i got home, so its been awhile since i've been able to fully interact with the internet.

    about 2 weeks ago i took the Pug north. The route was from my house here in Pacific Grove, Ca to Santa Cruz(ish) on the beach as much as i felt.

    The Pug was loaded up with its typical 3 to 4 days worth of rations, a solo tent, sandals, water filter, etc. Im still pretty spoiled, so i have a tendancy to take things like avocados, bannana, cheese, etc. when all is said and done the Pug comes in around 80 to 90lbs.

    by 730a i was out of the house and heading down the bike path. a totally grey morning, a bit fog drizzle, nothing exciting.

    at first sign of beach, i couldnt resist so it was with the psi dropped down along the sand i went. this morning there were a bunch of dolphins feeding on fish just past the swell. it made my first few moments entertaining.

    However once I got past Marina it was totally different story. the beach is pretty steep at points, the surf just crashes in your ear, the shore is so desolate, isolated, it where as if chronic depression. the visability was about 100ft and the sensation was strange. that is...after awhile of churning the pedals in that environ it kind of brings you down. Once i got to Moss Landing I was glad to exit the beach, find the pave and head away from that salty drizzle.

    I had left with 1 full large water bottle with Gatorade, and my Camelbak full. By the time i had got to the Pajaro river i was just about out of water, so i decided to filter water. Uhhh...not such a good idea. The MSR filter takes out the particulate matter, and i believe it to filter all the way down to .22Micron, but it wont filter out what is already disolved. The Pajro river goes thru ag fields, and my palate told me that the water seemed "salty". i only took a couple of sips, and dumped it along the way. Who's to say what kind of fertilizers, etc are in that river. so it was a learning experience, and a sad one at that. Sad to come face to face with the byproduct of humanity. (sigh)

    Once i had got to Sunset Beach i was more than happy to find fresh, clean, drinkable water. The weather had shifted, the sun was out, and i was peeling off the clothing, enjoying the sun, a light lunch, and some coffee.

    next it was to the beach and to explore the area a bit. this section of Monterey Bay is by far the best beach. its firm,flat, and sunny. almost like a hwy. at times i was able to run the big ring and just motor along. I'd stop myself to enjoy the experience.

    after quite sometime making my way north, i actually ended up as far as i could go, which was New Brighton State Beach. Once i got to camp, the day was a total of 10hrs.
    showers are 25cents for 2min.

    the next morning i went back down to the beach, rode back south a bit, to Rio Del Mar,where i made my way to the Forest of Niessen Marks. I made my way up hill til 2650ft (well that is what my Suunto read) when i was down to 1/2 water bottle again, no known water around,and the fireroad started downhill. I decided to retrace my route and think of New Brighton again.
    Intitially i had thoughts of camping at West Ridge campground, but when i had found the sight, it was full of flies and mosquitos. I cant stand that. so i was happy to get away.
    finally i had made my way back down to the Aptos creek, where i could filter water, and now with peace of mind, make my way back into and thru the world of townies.
    at the parking lot at the entrance to Niessen Marks, i chit chat with some peeps hanging around on their typically super nice XC bikes, CX, etc, and i think their reactions to the Pug,my ride, etc, was more entertaining to me, than i was to them. mostly they'd just sit, and like....uhhh.....duhhh....uhhh....you mean....uhhhh.....you rode....uhhh....from....where? Monterey??? on the beach??? uhhh....like dude....how much does that thing weigh??? uhhhh....you rode up to where??? uhhh....ummm....wow!

    by 7pm i was back on the beach and very close to New Brighton, where i'd stay for 1 more night. The Pug had been along the beach, and up into/thru the redwoods, fireroads, etc, of course all the while being completely self-supported. this day was 8hrs of effort.

    as i sat in meditation thru most of the night, around 3 to 5am or so, a large group of hobo's had gathered where i sat and watched them do their thing. Mostly sit around, chit chat, take showers, smoke, trade, etc. Life of hobos. it was really cool. i enjoyed the fact that i had been sitting long enough without movement that they didnt even realize i was there. at times they'd be about 20ft away as the darkness kept me from their perception as well as their preoccupations kept their minds as such.

    come morning it was time for me to pack up, and head back to Monterey. My route, straight home on the pave. in total. it was 5hrs. at the start around 11a the weather was sunny nice, and almost 80F. Once i got just south of Moss Landing, the marine layer was blowing in, the drizzle setting in, and the temp dropped 20degrees in about 2miles.
    all the way home from Pezzini Farms i kept wondering why i live on this side of the bay. the final miles where not so much demanding, or taxing, but really it was more of an onset of meloncholy. the combination of a perfect few days spent, new territories discovered, new people to chit chat with, a certain degree of being untethered to "the daily grind", with the hard cold factoid of going home. home where i'd shave, and get ready for work.
    when i get home...my computer doesnt work, the HD had crashed, and so it was...
    welcome home...

    peace..........d
    enjoy the pics
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  35. #35
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    more pics, not enough space...

    more pics, and not enough space to upload things. hmmm...i wonder how i could actually post text with the pics...you know...more betta format, instead of leaving you guessin when and where pics are takin from.

    however i did put them in chrono order.

    peace......d
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  36. #36
    Devo
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    another pug pic

    i dont know why i like this pic
    maybe its the light or something.
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  37. #37
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    How is it riding down the center of the railroad tracks like that?

  38. #38
    Devo
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    ca-chunk-ca-chunk-ca-chunk
    bump, bump, bumpity, bumpity, bump.
    lots of trash, glass, etc.
    slow goin
    endos with low psi just take it up
    bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce,bounce

    its boring, its weird, its more difficult that it would seem
    lots of trash and debris
    its a trip to basically ride thru people's back yards,
    open doors and windows that peeps dont think other peeps would be around
    hobo-trampin
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  39. #39
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    I've thought a lot about buying a pugsley, particularly to use the way you use yours, and the conclusion that I've come to is that to me, these are places that a bicycle doesn't belong.

    Wandering and bicycles are definitely my loves, and I do a fair amount of wandering in the saddle, but terrain like snowy trails, beaches, railroad tracks, etc seem like the domain of snowshoes and a well broken-in pair of boots.

    The pugsley is truly an amazing machine, and there may be one in my future yet...but as of this moment, I feel like having the ability to go EVERYWHERE by bicycle might not be best for me. My crosscheck can cover the miles that my feet can't.

  40. #40
    Devo
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    very true. and the $$$ i've put into my Pug is pretty crazy. but hands down the thing that it accomplishes, the thing that it shines more so than any other bike, is its dependability, and diversity.
    just last tues day i took it out on a group road ride, as well as last saturday too.

    its not so much "what its intended for" but the fact that it does everything.

    I've been eye balling the new BMW GS1200 Adventure. i think the Pug is to bicycles what that motorbike is to motorcycles.
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  41. #41
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    a clean Pug? Garrison duty?

    what?
    yup, after the roadies around here started sayin that i need to wash the Pug, it started me thinking.
    so here it is.
    all clean,
    wow!
    reminds me of a time when i was in Army, we'd be in the field, go all over god's good earth on deployments, and it always amazed me how we'd go to a wash rack, clean up the vehicles and howitzers as to not leave debris and simply look good while in convoy on hardball.
    back in garrison, again with the cleaning, pmcs, everything lined up on their chalk marks in the motorpool, howitzers fresh with breakfree, muzzle plugs, etc.

    a fresh clean drive train, shinny cogs and chain, clean OD green, flat black tyres, everything serviced and operational.

    peace...........d
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  42. #42
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    I love this thread and how you just ramble on about ramblin'. Good stuff! Although it is entirely unnecessary for my trails, you make a Pug sound downright desireable. Keep it coming.

    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  43. #43
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    your like kane from kung fu, puggin all over the earth

  44. #44
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    wondering ways

    thanks for the compliments on the ramble.

    the Pug is a very desirable companion. the limiting factor is the rider. The rider's mindset,their psychology, the physical ability follows.

    sometimes i get bummed out when i see all the bikes atop of cars, their riders now drivers, soon to get out, click in and become riders, but of course only in a park. a park authorized, that is approved for their choice form of recreation, which turns to sport, with sporting campaigns, sporting companies, and again...another choice venue. season after season, dollar after dollar do we spend, expend our daily lives grinding away in our office cubicals, or maybe with hammer and nails, or behind some register processing the passers-by. our friends we have friendly competion, our frustrations play out, we vent along the way, the recreation our salvation from the daily grind, a place of sactuary, a place where we get in rythm, as if dust from our wheels, so goes our collective industrialized minds, in a plume, faded away, i was there, am not now,only here, and only here is where its really always been, everything else dust, left to settle...

    On the ramble seems to be my natural spot. A harsh reality is setting into my mind these days, as im finding more and more that there is less and less to ramble around. Often i feel as if a fish kept in a large aquarium, day after day, making my way, gently detered by the invisible barrier of thick acrylic, a metaphysical conundrum for sure, as i make my way hoping to come upon a place to somewhere else. In reality, im only a few days, if that, away, hopefully at times there is peace and quiet, a tranquil moment, when there is not a single man made sound. to sit and dissolve, acutely aware, and yet the common thinking of "I" is gone.

    these are places the Pug can take a person.

    to put mountain bikes/life into perspective, I've come across this little ramble below.
    enjoy

    peace.........d


    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    Gold Rush Bicycling

    Terrence Cole, Professor of History at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, described some early bicyling in Alaska in the following Fairbanks News-Miner article originally published on May 1, 1978.

    "Though some people think of the bicycle as a toy, like a skateboard or a Frisbee, in the 1890s the two-wheeler was the technological wonder of the day.

    In magazines there were serious scientific articles about why bicycles would replace the horse, and miiltary experts like General A. W. Greely, the Arctic explorer for whom Fort Greely is named, thought that in the future, high-speed Army communications would be carried long distances by men on bicycles.

    In Alaska during the gold rush, the people who sold a special model called the "Klondike Bicycle" claimed it was the answer to every miner's prayer. On this wonderful bike each man could carry his necessary 1,000 pounds of supplies 500 miles from the Chilkoot Pass to the goldfields with ease and comfort.

    As one guidebook explained, "The Klondike Bicycle is specially designed to carry freight and is in reality a four-wheeled vehicles and a bicycle combined. It is built very strongly and weighs about 50 pounds. The tires are of solid rubber, one and a half inches in diameter. The frame is ordinary diamond, or steel tubing, built however more for strength than appearance, and wound with rawhide, shrunk on, to enable the miners to handle it with comfort in low temperatures."

    The bicycles had two special 14-inch retractable wheels on which a miner could load a quarter-ton, and "drag it on four-wheels 10 miles or so. Then the rider will fold up the side wheels, ride it back as a bicycle, and bring on the rest of his load."

    There are several amazing accounts of wheelmen riding down the Yukon River or up the Valdez Trail to Fairbanks. Last February, Alaska Magazine ran a story by Max Hirshberg about his bicycle trip down the Yukon in 1900, which he wrote in the late 1950s so his grandchildren would know the true story of his adventure. But he was not the only one who stampeded to Nome in 1900 on a bicycle seat.

    Ed Jesson was hunting caribou near Dawson City in 1900 when he decided to join the rush to Nome. Ed bought a "wheel," as bicycles were generally called then, from a man who had just ridden it in from the coast. When Ed's brother heard the news he couldn't believe it. Ed described what happened in his diary.

    "What the h___ are you going to do the wheel, he asked. Going to Nome, I said. He called Harry Smith and John Nelson, proprietors of the hotel, and some other oldtimers. He said this brother of mine is going to try to go to Nome on a bicycle. He's crazy, they all said. We will have to put him on the woodpile until he comes out of it."

    After practicing for a few days in Dawson and learning to keep his front wheel in a sled track, Ed took off down river. One day the temperature was down to 48 below. His rubber tires were frozen hard and stiff.

    He wrote in his diary, "The oil in the bearings was frozen. I could scarcely ride it and my nose was freezing and I had to hold the handlebars with both hands, not being able to ride yet with one hand and rub my nose with the other."

    All the way down the Yukon people thought Ed was crazy for riding a wheel, especially since he owned a good dog team, but he said he didn't have to cook dog food for the bicycle at night, and on good days he could cover 100 miles.

    Many of the old-timer miners and Indians on the Yukon had never seen a bicycle before, and Ed was always showing how it worked.

    After more than a month on the trail, Ed pulled into Nome, and except for the bruises he had from constantly falling down, he and the bike were in good shape."

    © Terrence Cole
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    those are wondering ways!

    today we'd make an event out of it.
    get the permits
    apply a fee
    get a clock
    make it sport
    stand on a podium

    and what does this do?
    removes us from the experience
    it takes us "away" from that which it really is.
    in the natural world are no clocks
    no fees
    and no podium

    we here in the social world would think..."but what of the glamour?"
    and
    "why would you ever want to do that?"

    lol

    peace............d
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  45. #45
    Devo
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    i guess its been a week now that I've been on some new Ritchey V4 Comp MTN pedals. they were $38/pr at Cambria Bike, so i got 2 sets.
    On the Pug every day, i've come to very much like them. My 6yo pair of ATAC's now tossed in a box that i cant find.
    their black finish fits well on the Pug.

    cool....new pedals...
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  46. #46

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    Pugs on the Kuskokwim...movie

    <object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/z3XjU_0UqBw"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/z3XjU_0UqBw" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

  47. #47
    Devo
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    that is so cool. sometimes i think i need to leave Cali
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  48. #48
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    clean and resting

    the weather here in Pacific Grove/Monterey is holding with sunshine, a nice cool seabreeze, and i think the coldest its been is 52F in the early. I love to sleep with all the windows open, ocean salt makes its way in thru my rental loft, while the barking of sealions echo about.

    the Pug has been cleaned up for about a week or so, its a trip to have it so clean. its road bike clean! its almost counter-existential. along with the trend, I've taken the bar ends off, reducing it to just a plain simple straight bar. the bar ends found their way onto my Salsa Moto Rapido.

    awhile back I took the advice from the Cane Creek crew, took apart my Thudbuster and re-greased it with white lithium grease. and viola! squeak/creak gone... sometimes i amaze myself with how i can miss a simple solution. duhh...
    so the Salsa is primed with a thudbuster, and comfy barends. The other day i had placed an order with Old Man Mountain for new racks, that are intended for the Salsa. Panniers of course will follow, and the next shot of days off I hope to find myself on the ramble.

    While the Pug will remain at home, all cleaned up, all pretty like, a wallflower, keeping my abode in karmic harmony.
    the next trip i have in mind, i think is a bit much for me and the Pug. No doubt the Pug can make the haul. the question is if i could keep the pedals churning for the distance. A maiden trip, a recon of sorts, i'll take upon Moto Rapido instead. this trip could very well be of the tarp and sleeping bag type.

    as we head into November with the sun shinning thru the windows, ambient temp at 71F, i wonder how fast the frost will come, what this winter will be like, and how much bike camping i can get.
    all in alll, with the less than perfect weather that winter brings, i really enjoy the solitude.
    so for now the Pug sits.
    more stuff has been listed on eBay, and suddenly I start thinking about the Big Dummy.

    eBay has quickly become my friend, all the bike stuff i no longer use, is slowly going out. more and more room is made, and of course my craving mind grasps at ideas of new stuff.
    when i go thru this stuff i've got laying around, and as i clean it up a bit, catagorize the piles, and lay it all out in cognitive linear display, i'm somewhat amazed. like wow!

    so heres the eBay link:
    http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZasanacyclesQQhtZ-1
    take a gander.

    I've got so much stuff layin around, that its difficult for me to not build up a bike. all im missing is a cool rigid fork...then i could build up a swank SS. when you look at the parts listing you can see what im talking about.
    but how many bikes do i need?

    peace.........d
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  49. #49
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    Good job! Man, I feel you...

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    ..reminds me of a time when i was in Army, we'd be in the field, go all over god's good earth on deployments, and it always amazed me how we'd go to a wash rack, clean up the vehicles and howitzers as to not leave debris and simply look good while in convoy on hardball.
    back in garrison, again with the cleaning, pmcs, everything lined up on their chalk marks in the motorpool, howitzers fresh with breakfree, muzzle plugs, etc.

    a fresh clean drive train, shinny cogs and chain, clean OD green, flat black tyres, everything serviced and operational.
    I'm looking down at my worn out, cut off and made into shorts, sub bdu pants, and thinking I really do like the 1x1 being mostly black and stealthy.

    Great Stories, as always "D". We gotta figure out a day that I can get into work, when you're off, and have you stop by my work, on the Presidio, and let all my co-workers talk to you. I've shown some of them your stuff and they love it all.

    Keep up the Great Stuff man!

  50. #50
    Devo
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    Presidio? SF or Monterey?

    today i was on the phone, following up with some stuff
    as i'm always keyed into the sounds of aircraft, their azmith of approace, alt, etc
    I'm hearing this plane come in...im thinking its BIG, and its SLOW....what the???
    we are in mid conversation as I'm looking out the window watching some sort of subdued OD green(ish) large 4 engine cargo jet come in.
    nothing like i've seen before.
    not a C141, no whine to the motor, but something with a T-tail, and winglets on the tips of the main wings. the fuse looks very Boeing-esq.
    lots of wheels, BIG flaps, and on an approach alt lower than typical.
    me thinks to myself, its full of cargo (who knows what), therefore the descent rate not so steep.
    moments later...i hear the reverse thrusters. (obviously now on the tarmac)
    me thinks maybe that is why the Coast Guard dolphin heli was flyn some kind of curious pattern last night. maybe a security check?

    either way...
    you got to love OD green, and anything subdued...

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  51. #51
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    ... and if we just ...

    S.F.

    Now, sorry to go of topic folks, but...

    ~The new cargo's...definitely not the C1 Starlifter's my father flew in, and not the propped LC-130's...

    They're the C-17's, sick, sick power and agility.

    Here you go...

    I know which one you mean. They've been doing some night maneuvers out of Moffett the past few months. They're coming in REAL LOW, as in less than a mile off the deck around Fremont, etc, before turning back practicing touch and go's... having access to bases has it's benefits! I really get to geek out!

    You should've seen the Blue Angels fly over work last week, I couldn't work without smiling and laughing as customers kept freaking out and twitching as they flew over!!


    Now back to our other point...

    So, you gonna visit then?
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  52. #52
    Devo
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    WOW! thats the plane. crazy pics.
    so a trip to SF is what you are proposing....hmmm
    well... brother...I very much do appreciate the invite.
    however i am comfortable at this distance and the banter
    perhaps this year i will take the weekend off for SOC.
    its now been 2yrs since I've had a car.
    I think I've rented a car twice to visit my grandparents in SoCal
    all in all i dont think i've put 1000miles in a car in 2yrs.
    thanks for the invite

    peace...d
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  53. #53
    Devo
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    the Pug still sits all purdy and clean like, shinny chain and spokes. I've got my salsa all packed up, new racks, panniers mounted, now to get to bed, rest, and up early am...
    out the door...
    4 day ramble...
    peace........
    d-
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  54. #54
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    Let's see some pics of the Salsa. I'm interested in seeing a moto rapido set up for touring... I'm planning on doing the same thing to my Ala Carte...

  55. #55
    Devo
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    rapido tambien

    i have no idea how many lbs lighter than the pug. lol
    racks by old man mountain.
    peace.......d
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  56. #56
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    Awesome.
    I think I'm just going to have a rear rack. I prefer to travel light. I learned how to minimalize while hiking the A.T...
    Dreaming about the Great Divide Route... What have you got planned?

  57. #57
    Devo
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    i never hiked the AT, but did about 1.5yrs on my bike/camping/hiking playin Joe Hobo a techno yuppie hobo complete with Ti spork. Im leavin in an hour or two for just a 4 day ramble. a loop of sorts. pics to follow when i get back.
    peace...........d
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  58. #58
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    ...then again, I haven't actually tried stuffing a week's worth of gear and food into my panniers (ortliebs). I guess we'll see.
    I'm currently in grad school and ready for another epic adventure as soon as I'm out of here. Getting paid to study geology in the Bahamas can be sweet, but I've had enough of school for now...

  59. #59
    Devo
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    57hrs

    I just got back from my trip.
    1 day early.

    while this ramble is not about the Pug, that is...
    its not the bike in the highlight today.
    rather it is still sitting next to my futon, all clean, on display
    however...I say this about the Pug.
    if i hadnt spent the last year almost daily on the Pug i doubt that i could have done this ride.

    I rode from my loft here in Pacific Grove, Ca. 93950
    up and over HWY68 to HWY1, go south to Carmel Valley Rd and keep on goin...
    turn right into Arroyo Seco and go past the pavement, onto Indians Rd.
    On Indians Rd that is the "no mans land"
    Continue on Indians into Ft. Hunter Liggett, turn right on Nacimiento Ferguson Rd.
    climb Nacimiento and descend into Kirk Creek
    now on HWY1 56miles south of Carmel Valley road
    go home on HWY1.

    the trip went like this...
    rollin on Carmel Valley rd is mostly climb, and a long ways at that
    then into Arroyo Seco, i get to the campgrounds and this guy at the toll booth, is so very much the troll under the bridge of billy goat gruff.
    20$ to camp! forget it man...
    im just passin thru, I want to get to Indians Rd.
    ok...well that will be $5 for day use...
    dude...your killing me with this...
    you want to get there right?
    ya...
    well...its $5

    Arroyo Seco campgrounds looks like a very nice place to stay. High dollar in my opinion.
    at the end of the campground, which is again...more climbing
    Indians Rd starts where the pavement ends.
    and when they say Arroyo Seco is a gorge...it definately is.
    it could have easily been a scene from Kings Canyon
    at less than 2000ft the terrain is hard, the rocks jagged, and the drop to the river is probably at least 500ft. straight down

    its late in the after noon, im spinning the pedals, and looking for water to filter.
    im anticipating less than 20 miles of unknown terrain, and lack of water, plus a night of camping, a meal, coffee or tea, etc. i need water.

    I find a trail that drops into the gorge and decide i better take the opportunity. its a bit of a drop, very steep. as i've ridden every last inch possible, i've got to climb another 1/4mile to the water. at this point i had definately thought about simply just camping at this spot. especially since it had been about 6hrs of effort up to that point. instead i opt to keep going.

    as i get back onto the dirt road, and get ready to climb, i hear a persons voice...
    a guy, whom im thinking is the ranger, or other authority, is walking up to me, with a light backpack, and a knife on his hip. its looking about 10". crew cut hair cut, and hoofin it at a pretty quick clip.
    he hikes as fast or faster than i can climb. the road is quickly turning into double track, and often just single track, the light is dropping, the temp is doin the same.
    this guy is not given me a break...
    we continue...
    up and up and up
    he keeps making strange coments...
    he's not a happy guy
    mostly disgruntled
    a special ed teacher, and he rants and rants about politics, etc...
    every so often he checks his knife, and likes me to be infront...
    im uneasy...
    but dont show it...
    as im telling him i work at the hospital...
    i was in the Army, etc...
    he starts to show some respect for me...
    i never really tell him my exact plans...where im going, etc.
    its now dark, and we keep on with the climbing...
    im wondering how long this will keep on
    suddenly he says that he'll be turning around in about 10 minutes, and does!
    I keep on for 1.5hrs of climbing just to ease my mind...
    i find a level spot in a saddle that has an eastern esposure to the left(ish)
    im at about 2300ft or so
    the whole time i've been climbing with a single LED backpacking light
    cycling it off and on every so often
    the moon is 1/2 full, enough of a purple light to cast a shadow
    i sit and listen....nothing
    i pitch camp.
    10hrs effort for the day.

    in the am i wake up to daylight wanting to break
    frost on the panniers and tent...
    the sun crests, and the temp drops 8degrees so i crawl back in my tent and bag, opting to wait for Mr. Sunshine to make the day.
    by 10am im rolling.
    more climbing...
    climb, climb, climb
    Indians Rd, is nothing of a road.
    a fire road washed out for 10yrs now...its double track at times, and has a bunch of landslides. One in particular, i had thought to remove the panniers and portage my kit in pieces. suddenly i laff at myself with the thought/picture of me in the Ventana Wilderness scrambling across a landslide with 4 panniers in hand. Suitcases!

    the trip along Indians was a highlight for sure! Beautiful God's Country! i stopped to snap off lots of pics.
    Once i got to Indians Ranger Station, not a soul was to be found...nothing but desolation
    it seemed as tho i had the whole of the Ventana Wilderness to myself. the only way a person could be out there was to hike the route i took, or to hike from Big Sur, or The Los Padres Dam area. either way...i really doubt anyone was out there.

    From Indians Station into Ft. Hunter Liggett
    on post the miles just droned by...as i could hear a warbird over head
    mile after mile...of perfectly smooth pave
    the valley(s) are beautiful. Oak trees everywhere. the sound of acorns falling sounds of a crackling. like a fire. but instead, the trees are litterally raining acorns!
    i take a break at 3pm once im onto Nacimiento Ferguson Rd. its 5hrs of effort at this point.
    Acorns are EVERY WHERE! not little ones either. they are the size of your entire thumb if not bigger. 5 acorns split open, shelled, leaves you with a handful of acorn meal. almost a veggie burger worth! i can only imagine how many of thousands of tons are out there. its no wonder that Ohlone lived here for thousands of years. I wish i could at that moment!

    Climbing Nacimiento Ferguson the day is fading, the temp is dropping, i've been sweaty all day, clothes are damp, im adding layers, and its up, up, up. not the steep up of mountian biking, but instead, 15-30ft/min for 3hrs. Once i stopped to filter some water, the night was real close, so it was back to my LED backpacking light strapped to my helmet.
    darkness came quick, as i was climbing the east side of a ridge. left in shadow long time ago.
    wild life runs infront of me, stops on the road, puffs up, and darts off
    fox
    boar
    bob cats
    bats
    owls
    and countless small things that seem to scurry under pedal
    at the summit its 6pm on Holloween :-)
    looking west at the vast open expanse...
    1/2 moon
    the world is purple
    the road is mostly exposed
    no more shade trees
    no more forest
    instad grass lands, rocky hillsides
    purple moonlight guides the way
    while coastal fog strikes out in bright silver!
    Nacimiento summit is about 3-4000ft elevation
    Cone peak is to the right. From sea level to the top of Cone Peak @ 5100ft its the steepest gradient in the Continental US.

    descending Nacimiento under moon light is the most sublime, most surreal experience I've ever had. rolling along on the bike, like in a dream, all the details washed away, only the silver fog laying below, the feel of the bike beneath, modulating the brakes, while the heat is felt thru my shins. only to cycle the LED light off and on thru the darkest of forested draws and turns.
    into the fog layer, everything is now bright silver, a light drizzle, the taste of salt in the air, when suddenly i pass thru, and sparkles of light flicker below, bon fires at Kirk Creek, a lone car or two on HWY1 in the distance moving slow...
    suddenly i reflect on the past 2 days effort, my life, how it is that i've come to this point, all the racing, the military, the discipline, and yet the ability to let it all go, and to simply observe, take in, the moment.
    this moment...
    im consumed in awe, gods grace, my luck, the blessing of this moment, the experience...i break down...and emotional flood while still descending, the details of road under my pedals and before me washed away, only the details of flickering bon fires guide my general direction.
    a 45min descent under moon light...
    sublime for sure, awestruck...

    At Kirk Creek i spend Holloween, pitch camp, a racoon comes by...
    trick or treat
    i toss it a few scraps
    ask it to now leave...
    upon its return...now time for tricks, gone are the treats...
    i toss a small rock, then a throw, now to aim, and it runs away...
    again with a return, and now its the sling shot...not to harm, or mame, but to get the point across...
    as the moon is so bright, i can still make out its shadow when its 30ft away...slingshot...rocks.

    today...11/1/06
    the sun breaks...
    the dew bakes way
    im on the road at 10am
    Kirk Creek to Pacific Grove is my objective.
    about 60 miles.
    i stop along the way to shoot a few pics

    outside of Big Sur, just past the lighthouse
    i round a corner as people are scurrying from their cars...
    a crash
    mass confussion...
    i start barking out orders...
    a guy just stands there in shock with his cell phone in hand
    i tell him to call 911
    "where are we", he yells out
    me: "5 miles north of Big Sur just past the lighthouse on HWY1"
    everyone is out of their cars but one...
    ______________________________________________

    i say my prayers
    thank god for my days
    ______________________________________________

    i get back into town and its been dark for awhile now
    stop at Trader Joes for ice cream and coffee
    the scene is BRIGHT and ALIVE
    people stare at me
    i smile
    salt trails streak my stained black cycling clothing
    im faded
    im tired...
    im euphoric
    3 days
    2 sleeps
    and i have no idea how many miles
    how much climbing, etc.

    i get home and its just prior to 7pm.
    10am 10/30 to 7pm 11/1
    57hrs
    3 days
    2 sleeps
    solo
    unsupported

    peace...........d

    enjoy the pics
    :-)
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  60. #60
    Devo
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    more pics, not enough space...

    more pics...
    you can see how the climbing is for the most part...
    its gradual, and at times it can get a little steep
    but with a set of panniers, it adds up
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  61. #61
    Devo
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    pics, pics, pics

    pics...
    its all about the pics
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  62. #62
    Devo
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    still more pics

    this was the Hunter Liggett portion
    even got a pic of an old tank
    M60?
    and a shot of me at the base of Nacimiento Ferguson at HWY1
    Kirk Creek
    and a couple from Big Sur

    enjoy

    peace.........d
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  63. #63
    Devo
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    vids uploaded

    awhile back the HD on my laptop crashed, and somehow i dont have everything fully restored. oh well...what the heck...right? i mean...live is transitory, and why should i sit around and grasp onto the past.
    like...

    specifically, i decided to just republish my website, and who really even cares if its not restored.

    anyways...
    there are a couple of vids

    57hrs
    is the last trip i took

    Pug goes to SC is the beach ride.

    the are both fairly long
    a bunch of yada yada yada, etc

    anyways...vid of stuff around my locale.

    peace........d

    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles/iWeb/...s/Welcome.html
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  64. #64
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    the pug's life

    Devo, your tales have undoubtedly inspired the many who've read along this thread. You lament over those driving to the ride and working for the ride (aka play time) vs. living the ride (as your do).

    There's an expression: the sweet ain't so sweet without the sour, and it's symbolic of the point I'm trying make. Do we need to deny ourselves for most of the week to fully enjoy the fruit of singletrack and time away from it all? I mean, if this playtime is one's mainstay, does it loose it's lustre? Do you have to keep reminding yourself to appreciate each moment on the trail ?

  65. #65
    Devo
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    I think i hear where you are coming from. And i do agree with the sense of duality for sure. not that im about attempting to make point or anything, simply sayin..that we make choices, and as i work my 10 days in a row with 4 days off, the price of everything going up, i wonder why we choose to work so much, and why we always keep nudging each other out. why is it that its such a diffucult thing to attain...that being...simplicity and time to just ride a bike. i wish that we'd slow down.
    peace.....d

    It seems like the vids are downloading? ya?
    cool........
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  66. #66
    Spooooon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    It seems like the vids are downloading? ya?
    cool........

    The SC vid isn't working for me . . . just a big question mark.

  67. #67
    Devo
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    sorry about that (sigh)
    obviously im still having problems with my laptop and dot mac
    i should just break down and buy a new iMac, cams, etc, yada yada yada
    sorry :-/
    im trying to get things straightened out...
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  68. #68
    Devo
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    night beach ride

    my work hours keep me up late, and even when im off of work, my sleep patern pretty much stays the same.
    so the last few nights i've been out riding around late.
    tonight i decided to do a beach ride.
    cool.....


    peace......d
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  69. #69
    Devo
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    so i get home today, and the guy i rent my loft from is still up at 1130ish and comes out, "hey D- want to watch a movie?"
    ya sure...what ya got?
    "Who Killed The Electric Car?" I think its something you'd really enjoy,since your anti-car.
    Ok...cool...sounds like something right up my alley. I'd probably really dig it.

    and he's right, as its still playin out here on my laptop, its a documentry.
    rent this movie.
    "Who killed the electric car?"
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Kil...lectric_Car%3F
    so many other times in my life I've seen a this scenerio played out.
    a variation of a common theme.
    when i was kid, a freshman in HS, i went to school in Moro Bay. At the time Diablo Canyon was being built and there was alot of contention in the realm of energy.
    As i grew up, I ended up taking alot of autoshop classes,i worked in a garage, built up some hot rods in Ventura, sold them, etc, yada yada yada.
    everytime, my relationship with the car has ended in a sour note.
    including the last time when a drunk driver was on the wrong side of the road, totalling my then new Honda Element. Even then, when i had bought the Element, i felt that it was just wrong. I wasnt on the bike so much anymore, but i was "stable" working more, and not living my simi-pro hobo life out on the ramble on the bike.

    well...now its been just over 2yrs with no car. mostly i love my Pug, i ride it every day, and i'd say its safe to say i ride about 10,000miles a year, and i spend about 1/3 of my take home pay.

    so this movie strikes a note with me.
    i can remember auto shop...
    i can remember taking Bio 160. Humanity and the environment...

    all in all, its a whole lot of sensationalism
    a new movie out...
    politics,etc...
    a bit more than i wish to really get all caught up in...

    but i do no this....
    for me...
    the center of the universe is the bottom bracket.

    its a cool movie...
    typically i dont even watch TV
    much less watch a movie...
    but this movie is a cool documentry...
    i dig it...
    and i think its worth the 90 minutes...

    peace.........d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  70. #70
    Devo
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    so i get home today, and the guy i rent my loft from is still up at 1130ish and comes out, "hey D- want to watch a movie?"
    ya sure...what ya got?
    "Who Killed The Electric Car?" I think its something you'd really enjoy,since your anti-car.
    Ok...cool...sounds like something right up my alley. I'd probably really dig it.

    and he's right, as its still playin out here on my laptop, its a documentry.
    rent this movie.
    "Who killed the electric car?"
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Kil...lectric_Car%3F
    so many other times in my life I've seen a this scenerio played out.
    a variation of a common theme.
    when i was kid, a freshman in HS, i went to school in Moro Bay. At the time Diablo Canyon was being built and there was alot of contention in the realm of energy.
    As i grew up, I ended up taking alot of autoshop classes,i worked in a garage, built up some hot rods in Ventura, sold them, etc, yada yada yada.
    everytime, my relationship with the car has ended in a sour note.
    including the last time when a drunk driver was on the wrong side of the road, totalling my then new Honda Element. Even then, when i had bought the Element, i felt that it was just wrong. I wasnt on the bike so much anymore, but i was "stable" working more, and not living my simi-pro hobo life out on the ramble on the bike.

    well...now its been just over 2yrs with no car. mostly i love my Pug, i ride it every day, and i'd say its safe to say i ride about 10,000miles a year, and i spend about 1/3 of my take home pay.

    so this movie strikes a note with me.
    i can remember auto shop...
    i can remember taking Bio 160. Humanity and the environment...

    all in all, its a whole lot of sensationalism
    a new movie out...
    politics,etc...
    a bit more than i wish to really get all caught up in...

    but i do no this....
    for me...
    the center of the universe is the bottom bracket.

    its a cool movie...
    typically i dont even watch TV
    much less watch a movie...
    but this movie is a cool documentry...
    i dig it...
    and i think its worth the 90 minutes...

    peace.........d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  71. #71
    Devo
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    its 2330hrs im off duty, doin my typical ride home down Holman HWY, its less than 50F and i've been really digin my new handle bar mits.

    zoomin down Forest past Trader Joe's...
    spinin out a 44x12t on Pug with a Vega is a bit sketchy, but ok in a straight line

    full speed, set up wide, and i pull the outside bar for the 1st right hand turn into the Candy Cane lane neighborhood with no brakes, as i've been pushin this right/left zig zag combo for more than a year now, and i've got just about 1.5ft of safety zone narrowed down.

    Im into the turn, committed to my line, lookin into the darkness where the Vega is yet to come around, when i notice MOVEMENT!

    I grab a handful of the binders, pull the Pug off edge, and onto the meat of its tyres, when the light comes around and i find myself...

    Head on collision course @ 30mph+ into the antlers of a large buck!
    he's moved a bit, but has decided to defend the doe he's with.

    Im grabbin the binders A LOT MORE, off the back of the saddle a bit, and the rear is startin to slide, stepin out to the left, as the front tyre digs in, me braking more, im on that edge, as the rear wants to come off the ground, while still tryin to turn, the front grabbing all i can put into it...
    it skips a couple of times...
    all i see is deer and antlers...
    UP CLOSE!

    bang!
    contact!
    antlers to handle bars!
    me still with forward momentum
    still on the brakes...
    deer hooves slide on asphalt
    we are locked...
    im upright...
    deer slides more...
    we stop

    track stand
    deer in Vega light

    i scream
    Raaarrr!
    shake the bar...

    we break contact
    it looks at me...
    and moves onto a lawn with his antlers at me
    i cirlce on the street...

    say my prayers...
    and give thanks for the experience

    I've had some wacky days on the bike
    some wacky experiences
    some bland and mundane ones too
    well...mostly

    locking handlebars with a buck was a first
    the thought had never crossed my mind
    but tonight
    on Morse Dr, 93950
    its a first in the Devo world :-)

    cool....
    i love riding a bike!

    peace........d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  72. #72
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    Wild Planet

    Yet another thing to be thankful for!
    Amazing story, as is this whole thread...

    Joining the legion of Pug People today, ordering my frame at least!

  73. #73
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    pug pics

    i thought this was a cool pic
    shot at about midnight

    peace........d
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  74. #74
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    Pug goes to SC vid.

    it looks like i finally have it loaded.
    so here it is
    long and drawn out
    peace......d
    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles/iWeb/...20to%20SC.html
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  75. #75
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    spinnie spin spin night ride

    so i went out for a little spinnie spin spin, ended up on Ft. Ord, it got dark, the temp dropped to 47F, i really dig having handlebar mitts, aka: Poggies

    here are a couple of pics.

    peace....d
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  76. #76
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    Bob Cat, Pug, Ord...home

    ok...we all know by now that i dont own a car. its been over 2yrs. everywhere i go is by bike.

    today i decide im going out to Ft. Ord, and check out some of the trails that has been a point of contention on the NorCal forum: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=248206

    Over the last weekend there was an equestrian event held out there, and some mention of the trails being all messed up, due to the horses, and the way their hooves chop up the trai. Well...it rained, the soil is sandy out there anyways, and it seems like the "chop" is pretty well knocked down, and the smooth, park like setting is returning.

    lol

    i said, "park like setting"

    just for reference, I was stationed there 87-91' in the Army assigned to a light artillery airassualt unit. the Army didnt think twice about environmental impact.
    lol
    its freaking hillarious!
    areas that are now "rehabilitated" some once old fire roads, rutted to the point that they were litteraly unwalkable, but yet of course, we'd drive a HumVee, 2ton, 5ton, pull a howitzer, etc, and make way.

    i was out there riding when the post was in decomission phase, when none of the ranges where marked, and of course all the fox holes where still there too.

    over the years, BLM and of course the masses of MTBR's out there the trails, they have been re-estalished, re-routed, surveyed, re-asseted, and re-enginered. all for the better.
    what is now 50
    was what we once called pinche chongo, that was so freaking scary fast that you never thought you'd live to recall. complete in the day, breaking thru deadfall, poison oak galore, as in the day, everytime you got under the canopy of oak trees, the beautiful green/red hue of the laying brush was noting but of course, poison oak. on that trail i recall the frame of a car or something being there, maybe a refrigerator frame, a transmission, and of course, the ever present, overgrown, foxhole that had been long since abandoned.
    for a cyclist at speed, plowing thru fresh underbrush, flashing thru the shadows, to come across a hidden foxhole was about like crashing into your coffin. :-) LOL!

    Now a days, we complain about hoove prints!

    so i took the Pug out to see what all the BS was about, and sure enough, its all totall BS. rest assured, BS. but lets not let our guard down. it would be all too easy to let any single user group get out of hand out there on the old training grounds that i learned the art of being a "Light Fighter".

    here are some pics.

    enjoy...

    peace.......d

    p.s.
    of course we all know that the Pug goes over almost anything. right?
    and of course, my head aint the way most peeps head is...
    lol
    my Pug is my commuter bike!
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  77. #77
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    night shots...im on a kick

    ok...so im on a night shot kick.
    are we tired of Pug pics yet?

    tonight it was 46F, and windy.
    i really enjoy having my poogies...
    that is, my Moose Mitts
    they are so crazy warm, WOW!
    i even thru in a set of chemical handwarmers.

    sittin around playin with the digi cam, with short finger gloves, in the wind...hands get cold.
    no problem, hop back on the bike and ramble around town.
    its too cold for most around here, hardly anyone on the streets.
    and its extra fun to ride in a new found level of comfort. when hands are really cold, just simply grab the handwarmer packets and hold them between the grips and our fingers.

    pure luxury.
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  78. #78

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    Hey Devo - nice paintjob - dumb Q - that color is called OD Green? Powder or paint? DIY or shop?

  79. #79
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    OD green Pug of course

    O.D. Green = Olive Drab Green
    aka: Army green
    and its powder coated, with frame saver on the insides, as well as the racks, of which the tubes are tubes are siliconed
    with the exception of the front of the front rack...
    being that the front rack is actually a rear rack..
    with a hack/mod job
    the resulting finish, of what is now the front of the front rack, left it kind of sharp, so i filled the holes with Goop as well as the rear, with safety in mind.
    that is...
    what a bummer it would be to crash and somehow have the pug take a biopsy out of you.
    i.e. like the way a open handle bar would cookie cutter a plug out of your leg if there were no handlebar plugs.

    so the Pug is Olive Drab Green in powdercoat. Flat OD Green at that. as compared to a gloss finish.

    back to racks and panniers
    + poogies
    + chemical handwarmer packets
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  80. #80
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    Pug vids on YouTube

    this is an old vid.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XB6SnqqdlCU


    and there should be a new one loading soon too.
    just a quick shot of riding on loose sand with full panniers, 3 days worth of provisions.


    peace......d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  81. #81

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    Really cool. Thanks for sharing

    Do you know if the Nice Front Rack works on the Pugsley? (I remember the hack job you linked me too in another post - but thought that maybe the front rack came out after the mod - because I didn't know they had a Nice front until recently).

    Where'd you get the small Surly decals/stickers for the rear?

  82. #82
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    vid, racks, decals, and more

    first here's a YouTube link
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dON5uybOA48
    its the Pug with both racks, panniers, and 3 days of provisions aboard. About 80lbs of bike.

    the Nice Front Rack will not fit a Pug fork, as its a front rack, and the hub spacing is like 110mm as compared to the rear hub spacing of 135mm. Im not sayin that it couldnt be done, some cold spreading (bending) would be in order.
    all in all, i opted for the clean mod job that had been posted. it had been done once, so i quickly followed.

    on racks...
    the thing with the Pug of course is the unique offset in the frame and fork. which necesitated that the rack is mounted on the inside of the lower rack boss. which in turn is a bit of a hassle to take the racks off and on. but really all it takes is to remove the wheels. being that now, the allen bolt head is located on the inboard side of the boss, next to the wheel.

    decals...
    I simply bought a new set of Surly decals. the kit comes with headbadge etc.
    in my view of Surly...
    they have got this whole game NAILED!
    they are like...
    the Schwinn, Huffy, AMC, etc
    what i mean is that...
    being that they are part of QPB (Quality Bicycle Products) they really are something along the lines of "America's Bike". that being...that the parts, et al are available at any LBS. and that is SUPER freaking cool!

    In the world of bicycles, it seems to me that Surly not only has a wide product range, but they are really the only Brand out there (at large) that is aimed at affordable, viable, transit for the masses, and the parts actually last!
    Good solid products! wow!
    so obviously im sold on Surly.

    now, to hold on for that new Big Dummy
    I also wonder about a KM compared to a Salsa El Mariachi
    two bikes of similar
    of course my brain goes in the 29er direction
    and im thinking of racks and panniers...
    and thinkin of a rig that can take slicks for the miles of pave, and swap over to knobs for when the pave ENDS.
    something that is expedition reliable, and yet fairly swift of the road.
    El Mariachi...
    im thinkin thin tubes, fancy paint, a bit dressed up
    KM...
    im thinkin 1/2 the price, toned down, reliable.
    what would seal the deal, is if the KM had rack braze ons.
    at this point it is all about the Old Man Mountain racks.
    http://www.oldmanmountain.com/

    so tonight i went out grabbed some Mexi food, had dinner with a friend, goofed off around the wharf in Monterey, took more pics. I guess im on a night shot kick.

    Poogies!
    its all about the Moose Mitts!
    the poogies and hand warmers!
    it was a bit windy and 40F on the wharf
    poogies are great. my new best friend.
    a bag of taffy from the candy shop on the wharf, the panniers, rack, left overs, digi cam, a cold night, poogies, and hand warmers. a scarce few people out and about. suddenly the world is that much bigger.

    lol

    i had to laff tonight
    doin about 20mph on th pave
    a guy crossing the street, about 1/2 buzzed, on his cell phone, steps off the curb to cross the street, as im zooming by with Vega light on, etc

    as i cross behind his path...
    on the phone he says, "oh sh#t those are some f*#cking huge tires! wait...he's pedaling! dude i thought he had a motor!"

    that was my laff of the night.
    Pug doin 20mph with lights, buzzing tyres, and 1/2 drunk guy on his cell phone trippin out.
    thats life on the Pug.

    peace....d
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  83. #83
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    Nocturne

    Keep 'er rolling, D, and the encounters with Monterey "wildlife" too!

  84. #84
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    90% of America

    Im at work, changing clothes, getting ready to get back on the bike and this thought flashes across my mind:

    90% of America's psyche can be found on TV

    i had a good long hard laugh with that one. in fact...i was still laffin as i was ridding home.

    another flashed across my mind

    Drive to work = Work to drive

    i was pretty amused.
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  85. #85
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    Pug-n-stores

    I’ve had a few bikes stolen in my bike days, and it really sucks. One of the misconceptions is that just bcz your bike is locked, its easy to fall into the mind that its secure. WRONG! I learned that a long time ago.
    Once when i was helping out, working in a local bike shop, i remember this real nice lady coming in, and looking around, we’d chit chat some, and it came down to that she was there looking to buy a lock. the question comes up, “What is the best lock?” my response, “None”. I told her the best lock is no lock at all. She was totally taken back, and started on this rant about her kids always getting their bikes stolen. I let her exhaust herself, to finally explain that locks lead us to a false thought, and that is...we think our bikes are secure when their are locked. We all know that its easy to steal a bike.
    Basically my technique is to limit the theft exposure time. that is...i rarely lock it up outside, and walk away. I hate that. I really dont like to lock the bike to a pole and walk into one of those big-ol box stores. No windows, high traffic area, lots of cars, etc.
    My best scenario is to take the bike INSIDE and lock it to a rack. Just like the pic above. This is in my local grocery store. and a big thanks to the staff that keep allowing me to bring my bike inside after work, and lock it to the food rack by the front wheel. Its pretty much damn near secure. What are the chances that someone is gonna walk in with a giant pair of bolt cutters and steel the Pug from right in front of the Deli counter?
    As it turns out, all my errands are to places where i can safely lock my bike. I cant begin to tell you how many times I had brought a bike into a store, and to have them say, “you cant bring that in here”, and my response, “I’ll do business elsewhere. Somewhere that lets me bring my bike inside.”
    In our American world that is so centered around a car life, the big parking lots, narrow bike paths, or no shoulder at all, the stupid bike racks at the end of the mall, but car parking right out front (consequently I dont go to the mall) bike acceptance has gone straight to the top of my values. If any of the talk about Global Warming has any truth to it, I feel really bad for those who drive cars. I know that I’m not completely excluded from the realm of oil consumption, but by and large, my eco foot print on this planet is pretty damn small. Single guy renting a loft, vegetarian, takes short showers, and i dont even eat meat. heck...I even work in the PM’s which seriously limits prime time utility usage. I flip on 2 lights a night for about 2 to 3 hours.
    Anyways...what this little rant is really about is the acceptance of a bike in grocery store, a simple lifestyle, and low impact on the environment. I have to laff when i think of the time when i was on the Pug with the tyres psi all low, as i was ridding up some real nice scenic single track, i came across this guy taking pictures and he frowns at me. Those big Pug tyres, i can see in his eyes, he’s so disgusted about the impact. We chat for a few moments, and he is anxious to get to the bike issue. When I point out that the big soft tyres leave less of a foot print than his hiking boots, he just trips out. Then when i point out that i didn’t drive a car to get there, he’s totally blown away. When I take my thermos out and offer him a cup of coffee, we become friends.
    And that is where I’d like to leave this. That is...driving a car is a choice, and the way we impact the environment and each other is a choice.

    peace....d
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  86. #86
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    addicted to night shots

    i cant stop taking night shots
    everywhere i look i see a pic
    its almost full moon, and i cant resist

    sorry if its getting boring.

    peace......d
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  87. #87
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    Life by Bike

    The biggest obstacle in the world of “Life on the Bike” is social acceptance. its the weirdest thing. Bikes are socially accepted as recreation, as sport, and even as toys for the kids. When or would we consider the bike as Transport?
    I get it from all directions. Tonight it was from a co-worker in passing sayin “aint it about time you get a car?” (in reference to the rainy night) my response was, “you know how i feel about cars. there aint one car out there that is worth a damn.” “they are all polluting the environment, they make us lazy, complacent, and we are slaves to them, making car payments, buying gas, and lets not forget the huge liability they are.”
    His response was, “so what are you going to do when you get run off the road?”
    I said, “i suppose I’d call an ambulance, or die.” it depends on the extent of injury.” then the conversation just escalated, until i pointed out that just as the conversation’s nature was, so was the dynamics of social responsibility and the bondage to the cycle of “Life with Cars”.
    In the end, i apologized, “sorry dude. I just dont drive cars.” “well...that is...for as long as i can hold out.”

    Its a strange thing to live this life on the bike. Being of the lifestyle that the bike is central to everything you do. Its THE MODE of Transpo for me. Every aspect of our lives are centered on the car. Parking lots are huge, the shoulders of the road are mostly non-existent, and simply the view most people have about bikes, typically makes me an outcast.
    Even in the realm of my local bike club, me being a person whom commutes by bike, buys groceries, etc. ya....Life by Bike. Even in the bike club, being that my focus is not of “sport” or “athleticism”, Life by Bike is too far of a fetch for most. In fact; I cant think of one person whom doesn’t own a car.
    What is the deal? Why do we constantly choose a life so busy, and grasping for those shiny material things. Why do we sell our selves? Why do we sell away our days? the simple life of contentment, and just being on the bike. its so easy. it blows my mind. I mean...do you know that when im on the bike, quickly there comes a time when not a single thing goes thru my mind? Sometimes, I’ll gather a few things, and head out. Ramble, and the miles just go by. Even the days will fade by. the mind empty.
    I dont understand why life is so full of strife and discord.

    I guess this is how i feel.
    peace...d


    Well look at all those fancy clothes
    But these could keep us warm
    Just like those.
    And what about your soul
    Is it cold
    Is it straight from the mould
    And ready to be sold.

    And cars and phones and diamond rings
    Bling, bling
    Those are only removable things
    And what about your mind
    Does it shine or
    Are there things that concern you more
    Than your time

    Gone going
    Gone everything
    Gone give a damn
    Gone be the birds when they don’t want to sing
    Gone people
    All awkward with their things
    Gone

    Look at you out to make a deal
    You try to be appealing but you lose your appeal
    And what about those shoes you’re in today
    They’ll do no good
    On the bridges you burnt along the way

    You’re willing to sell anything
    Gone with your herd
    Leave your footprints
    And we’ll shame them with our words

    Gone people
    All careless and consumed
    Gone
    Gone going
    Gone everything
    Gone give a damn
    Gone be the birds if they don’t want to sing
    Gone people
    All awkward with their things
    Gone
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  88. #88
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    BB Movie and more

    its cold (Monterey's standard of cold), and i'm conditioned to this circadian rythm secondary to my vocation/occupation of being on duty til about 11pm.

    so even on my days off i tend to get up kind of late, and stay up late.

    tonight was no exception. by the time i was coffied up, and well enough rested/ready to see the world, it was already late in the day. Just a couple of errands, around town, and yup, camera and tripod in panniers.

    one thing leads to the next, mostly pedal the Pug, go around town, and next thing i know, I've been cruizin around for a couple of hours.

    a little night ride along the beach, watch the cops, the hobos, the cars frantically in a hurry to get somewhere, and then im home.

    i dont watch much TV, and its been on AMC since the last time i turned it on, probably about 10 days ago.

    much to my surprise and pleasure, the night has been filled with The Blues Brothers. What more could i ask for?

    sittin around, i decided i need to polish up the hubs on my Zipps. I come to re-realize how much I've grown to dislike polishing things.

    i think about the Pug and how i never polish it.

    its like the Blues Mobile.
    the scene Jake and Ellwood jump their old cop car across an opening/rising bridge.
    Ellwood says....
    "its got pick up"
    "its got a 440ci power plant"
    "its got cop tyres"
    "its got cop suspension"

    the Pug has that same character.
    no need to polish it
    it constant, its not fussy, it goes any where.

    enjoy the pic(s)

    peace.....d
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  89. #89
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    are we tired of pics?

    more pics
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  90. #90
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    Nope

    Never tired of pics, or the tales therein!

    May I share one also? My Pug, in embryonic form!
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  91. #91
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    lol
    cool
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  92. #92
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    more about rambling and on...

    more pics from today.
    today's ride was out to Ft. Ord.
    I kind of did a little trip down memory lane.
    went to the last remnants of my unit
    visited the motor pool
    stared at the chalk marks on the ground where the howitzers where lined up
    and just kind of tripped out a bit.

    now its CSUMB
    and the motor pool has a road going thru it.
    where my original motor was, there are now dorms

    my old barracks in DIVARTY are now dorms for CSUMB

    all the better i say
    its really refreshing to see kids walking on the grass
    hanging out
    doing the things that kids in school do

    long gone are the days of PT at 0600hrs
    military discipline is the past
    it nice
    im glad

    so here are some pics from todays ride.

    on a slight tangent...
    i'd like to plug the point that riding a bike doesnt have to be a car transport thing.
    as you all know...
    i havent had a car for over 2yrs now
    everywhere i go is on the bike
    today i rode all over Ft. Ord
    i didnt drive out there to go mountain biking
    i rode from my place here in Pacific Grove and did the whole little deal
    today was probably about 60 miles

    so it was trip down memory lane
    and as trippy as that was, as the night started to settle in...
    my best photos are of some BEAUTIFUL Amanitas!

    peace......d
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  93. #93
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    Thank you for driving
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuiMF2-T6Kw


    Thank you for driving
    (sort of like the movie..."Thank you for smoking")
    i aint got much originality
    need a better computer

    or...

    "Drive to work = Work to drive"
    about how so much of America spends its time in drive thrus
    how much they spend on car related items/activity
    about "Global warming" (that dont exist)

    and most importantly...
    how you dont have to drive a car to go for a bike
    ride.

    its about how a bicycle is this awesome piece of
    transportation.

    one of these days, I'll make a for realz vid.

    enjoy
    :-)

    peace.......d

    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles

    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the
    human race." H.G. Wells
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  94. #94
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    Nice video . . . I understand the problem with car culture, but as a bike riding car user, I felt that some of the commentary was judgmental and might hurt the cause. I agree that the role of automobiles is out of control and your video did a great job illustrating the problem.

  95. #95
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    we will never give up the car or corn syrup

    Quote Originally Posted by Hairllama
    Nice video . . . I understand the problem with car culture, but as a bike riding car user, I felt that some of the commentary was judgmental and might hurt the cause. I agree that the role of automobiles is out of control and your video did a great job illustrating the problem.
    I appologize if the vid was a bit harsh, and that you felt it was judgemental. i really had no idea that i was gonna do that vid, but it had been in the back of my mind for some time. Even still, it obviously can stand to be done in a better light.

    I am simply stating some facts that have been floating around.
    something like(ish) (as i dont recall the website(s) with stats)
    there are about 200K less vehicles in the USA than the entire population
    something like there are 60K more registered vehicles than there are liscensed drivers
    (dont even think of all the new cars still at the dealers)
    and that every gallon of fuel burnt = 19lbs of Co2 (i actually remember this reference: Al Gore, An inconvenient truth)

    the worst is the Aerospace industry
    there is no EPA when in comes to air travel
    the issue is that when a jet travels thru the stratosphere, it is giving the atmosphere a direct injection. the impact is much more acute as compared to fuel being burnt on the ground.

    something like...
    the average flight from New York to London is equivalent to a SUV running 24hrs/day for 3yrs. Per person.
    worst yet...
    the daily domestic flights = about 1.5yrs of a SUV running 24hrs/day per person.

    the major difference is, "the lung effect"
    that is...
    here on the ground, exhaust is subject to the weather, and of course, the vegetation "flitering" the air. (maybe us breathing it helps filter it too...lol)
    that is...
    the air moves back and forth, up and down, etc, secondary to the dynamics of weather patterns.

    at 30,000ft the chemical reaction is much different.
    fuel exhausted at this altitude reacts with the atmosphere differently and most of all...
    it doesnt have that "lung effect"
    once its injected into the stratosphere, it stays there.

    as everyone knows by now, I havent had a car for over 2yrs.
    i have rented a car twice to drive to SoCal and visit my grandparents/family
    in every instance, I so very much wish that i could simply ride to Salinas, hop on Amtrak (with my bike and other junk) and take the rail to SoCal.
    In fact, I wish that i could tour the USA in this fashion.
    and i dont mean, get to the station, take your bike appart, box it up and have it loaded on as luggage/freight or whatever its called.
    i mean...simply pull up and put the bike in a rack on the train. Commuter style.
    (thats my dream)

    as for cars in general...
    I've had a love/hate relationship with them most of my life.
    as a kid i took all the autoshop classes there were to take in HS
    and i even worked in a shop for about 2yrs wrenchin on cars in Ventura, Ca.
    I've built a few hot rods in my day
    and motorcycles too
    what im saying is that i definitely can dig the gig with motorized transpo
    heck...I keep looking at buying that stupid new BMW GS1200 Adventure (the Pug of motorbikes, of sorts)

    the last car was a new Honda Element of which i had for about a year.
    ultimately a drunk driver was on the wrong side of Lighthouse Ave
    we had a head on collision. element vs dodge caravan
    both new cars.
    both totalled.
    cops, insurance, etc, etc.
    alot of effort, alot of money, and for what?
    a stupid car to zoom around in
    its a drag to think about how many hours of work i put in and to direct that $ in the direction of a car. $20k car?

    at that point i decided i was going to go "carless" once again in my life
    but this time...
    I'm single, and have FEW obligations
    its been over 2yrs now on the bike
    and i have to say, that its so much better being on the bike EVERY DAY.
    and the practice of expanding on "the way to life via a bike" is very rewarding.
    but...
    i do realize i am very fortunate to live here in Pacific Grove.
    If i were still in Ventura, I'd seriously be thinking of moving.

    Ideally, in my mind's eye, a good place to live is where there is nature immediately available, there is a sustainable economy, and the infrastructure is "bike friendly"

    In our society these days, that is a very unique characteristic to search for. I think we as people want this, but generally we access nature via driving our cars out of suburbia, make a reservation via www.reserveusa.com and go car camping. that is us in a nutshell. its the L.L. Bean limited edition Subaru, COACH Lexus SUV, Eddie Bauer Explorer.

    and the cost of cars is really insane.
    where here in the USA the mean income for a family is about $40k/yr
    and how much is the mean car? $20k?
    how much is a house? its not like car prices vary in relation to real estate.
    not to mention the operating cost, gas, insurance, maitenance,etc.
    and what of the environmental impact?
    what of the health concerns?

    Pollution and Heart disease
    Cars, cigarettes, and fast food.

    of course its damn near impossible to escape this...
    everything i consume, food, clothes, the products used at my job, my laptop, electricity,etc...
    are all dependant on fossil fuel
    and can i possibly go a single day with out consuming corn syrup?
    its in everything!
    heck...i wouldnt be surpised if its in the epoxy used to make carbon fibre cranks

    as cyclists, i try/hope to advocate/point out, that the bike can be more than a recreational sport of choice.
    here in Monterey,i am a long time standing member of VCM (Velo Club Monterey).
    I have done my fair share of bike racing (including 24hr solo, of which i've had a few 4th place finishes)
    even here in Monterey, amoungst my fellow VCM'ers, the "Bike Advocacy" position is a meak squeak from me here in my corner. the most reactions are on subjects of pot holes,glass, etc, that present an inherent danger to "cyclists". we have TAMC (Transportation Agency of Monterey County...thank you) that is available to help with these issues.
    but here at heart...we as cyclists do we integrate the bicycle into our functional daily life? Mostly its get off of work, go for a ride, blow some steam off.

    in my addicted state to cycling, i finally directly asked myself, "how can i live on the bike?"
    as a kid i knew this answer. "dont own a car"
    as an adult this answer was...well...childish.
    so a series of compromises played out over a bit more than a decade.
    mostly i'd only own a reliable hoopty.
    at first it was an 83' Civic
    then it was an 82' Subaru wagon
    both cars were just hoopty enough to keep me from daily driving
    and definitely i didnt want to move too far from my job. (10-15miles is my ideal)
    $600/yr insurance and a take of gas would easily last a month.
    they where so hoopty that they rarely required being locked.
    that 82' subaru wagon was the best.
    when or if you slid it into a hillside, i never really cared too much. so what...more dents and scratches.

    but these days, i've pretty much given up on cars.
    simply they cost way too much
    the cost fiscally, environmentally, politically, and personally in regards to health...
    the price is too much
    that is...
    thats my personal view.
    as long as i can get away with not owning a car, the more my assets stack up.
    ironic aint it?
    its amazing to live the life
    when it comes to dating, and social life...
    the car pretty much holds us hostage

    the day i meet a girl who does her errands on the bike, goes to work, and she too having the Bottom Bracket the center of her universe, well...
    _________________(fill in the blank)
    but really...
    can you actually imagine a vegetarian, buddhist, simple living cyclist?

    probably not in the US
    that is why we have all the bling
    fancy phones
    and diamond rings

    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    Jack Johnson, Gone

    Well look at all those fancy clothes
    But these could keep us warm
    Just like those.
    And what about your soul
    Is it cold
    Is it straight from the mould
    And ready to be sold.

    And cars and phones and diamond rings
    Bling, bling
    Those are only removable things
    And what about your mind
    Does it shine or
    Are there things that concern you more
    Than your time

    Gone going
    Gone everything
    Gone give a damn
    Gone be the birds when they don’t want to sing
    Gone people
    All awkward with their things
    Gone

    Look at you out to make a deal
    You try to be appealing but you lose your appeal
    And what about those shoes you’re in today
    They’ll do no good
    On the bridges you burnt along the way

    You’re willing to sell anything
    Gone with your herd
    Leave your footprints
    And we’ll shame them with our words

    Gone people
    All careless and consumed
    Gone
    Gone going
    Gone everything
    Gone give a damn
    Gone be the birds if they don’t want to sing
    Gone people
    All awkward with their things
    Gone
    __________________________________________________ ___________________

    and worst yet...
    is it really true that the world is more and more going down the same road that we here in the USA are taking?
    are the simple healthy cultures vanishing?
    do they all want cellphones, cars, box stores, and malls?
    __________________________________________________ ______________________

    at this point...
    in my microcosom, simplicity via bike seems to be a safe place
    that is until i get hit by a car :-/

    that is my socio-political-environmental-personal rant

    if you read all this garb...I very much appreciate your attentiveness.
    you probably have similar notions
    so go out there,and ride your bike
    try not to buy that new Hybrid
    try to simplify
    and ride bikes.......



    peace........d
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  96. #96
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    Jack Johnson, Symbol in My Driveway

    i've got a symbol in my driveway
    i've got a hundred million dollar friends
    i've got you a brand new weapon
    lets see how destructive we can be

    i've got a brand new set of stencils
    ive been connecting all the dots
    got my plans in a zip lock bag
    lets see how unproductive we can be

    i've got a light bulb full of anger
    and i can switch it on and off
    in situations it can be so bright
    i cant believe, how pathetic we can be

    i've got a perfect set of blueprints
    im gonna build somebody else
    might cost a little more than money
    but whats man without his wealth

    i've got a phosphorescent secret
    but dont you tell nobody else
    next thing you know
    the whole world will be talking
    about all the clues they got
    they just ain't no use
    they've got us fooled
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  97. #97
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    so im trippin out a bit... (like thats new?)
    trippin on that about 500 Pugs have been sold far...

    Im trippin on the lady who started in on me for parking by Xtracycle infront of the store, and that i rode down the side of the cars, and that i dont have to wait in traffic like everyone else.

    Im trippin that someone is eBaying away their Pug...
    what the...?

    and im trippin on wondering where and what those Pugs are doin at this moment...
    im trippin on Project Rowanda... www.projectrwanda.org
    on that the farmers use bikes to get their coffee beans to market, and that there is a need for a large volume/heavy cargo bike
    Big Dummy, Xtras, fat tyre bikes, Pugs all come to mind...
    somehow i want to be there building bikes, helping the peeps...
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  98. #98
    Devo
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    with the recent posts/news of Pugs, i wonder if a "Post a Pic of your Pug" thread would be interesting?

    489 pics of Purple Pugs?
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  99. #99
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    I say start the thread...
    and I'll get my camera batteries charged

  100. #100
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    the other day, i was out running errands on the Pug with the panniers, as it seems these days, I like the bike best fitted with bags to carry things.

    On the way to work, i realize that i need some glass cleaner, so i stop by the hardware store, as its the easiest place to stop that i know will have the stuff.
    for those of us out there, that dont know, basically the tactic in the life on a bike, is to pick places that are easy to get in out out. especially when it comes to having a good place to lock the bike.
    Here in PG the worst places to go are the big grocery stores, RiteAid, etc. these places are TOTALLY oriented to the customer that drives a car. Awesome parking lots, with not a single safe place to lock the bike.
    anyhow...my stop was at the hardware store.
    I buy Ace window cleaner, toss it in a pannier by itself, and off to work i go.

    Some 9 or 10hrs later, when i actually finish work, and get home, haul the Pug upstairs into my loft, I open the pannier, only to find that the spray bottle lid has somehow unscrewed off, and dumped a whole bottle of window cleaner into my pannier. LOL!
    Hillarious!

    The thing that TOTALLY blew my mind was that the Novara Expedition pannier didnt leak any of it out, and not only that, but i just unclicked it from the rack, opened the bag, took out the bottle, and poured it all back into the bottle! those panniers ROCK!
    so i got a really clean pannier, and saved the contents.

    a reverse test of pannier waterproof function.
    lol

    suddenly i see myself livin the life of Hobo-Joe on the ramble, washing car windows at major intersections, taking donations, with a squeegee dumped into a pannier full of windshield washer fluid.
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  101. #101
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    today here in PG/Monterey the wind is CRAZY!
    gusts around 30mph, the ocean is just nothing but white caps.
    the shingles on the house rattle
    the doors clatter back and forth
    the sirens go on and on and on
    trees are probablly falling all over the place
    today's mission, errands, groceries, etc.
    check out the chaos...
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  102. #102
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    a shot of optimism...

    A shot of optimism today came from the masses at large. Specifically I was so thrilled to have numerous inquiries as to the function of the Pug and the “Car Free Life”. I imagine that the Pug does most of the selling. However i still would like to hold the idea that we (we Americans) are interested in alternative ways of transport. Mostly they would ask what the bike was “for” and when i’d reply it was for riding, doing errands, being dependable, and the core of a “Car Free Life”, their eyes would quickly loose interest, but as soon as I’d dub it as a “Snow Bike”, or “Sand Bike” their zeal would quickly return. A sort of coaxing in effect. that is...to sell them something they already know, in this case a bike, and to offer the notion of the common American obsession with SUV’s, but to quickly reverse the environmental impact in the light of a low impact bicycle, that could actually carry practical items...like...GROCERIES...well...just as mind blowing as the Pug is to the average cyclist, so were the staggering reactions.
    When it comes to a bicycle, its not all that flashy; there isnt anything really that new to report. We have all seen bikes thru out our lives, and to various degrees we have had some sort of interaction/experience with the “Bike Life”.
    While the Pug is locked to the bike rack in front of Trader Joe’s, it gets all sorts of attention. I pretty much figure its the tyres that are the attention getters. How can we comment on that psychoanalysis? I imagine that in the common American’s mind, when it comes to the concept of transportation there is an immediate association with a wheel. Each American on their own wheel is some sort of symbol of Freedom. B.C. Comic had that nailed. Now only if I would learn how to ride one of those Surly Conundrum unicycles, I’d fit the role all that much more. Perhaps that is why trains are not so fashionably sot out, nor the bus. not to have your own wheel is some sort of subconscious slander to the concept of freedom. as my brothers in LA call the city bus, "The Looser Cruiser". bcz that is what it is. if you dont have a car you are a LOOSER. it seems there is some sort of correlation between what is ambiguously viewed as a symbol of success and the size of the wheels we roll on. Now only if the Pug would roll on a set of spinners. lol I have to be conscious to keep an easy breath in these “Public situations” as i know the unfortunate frequency for the comment(s) equating the Pug to a Hummer. where i typically roll my eyes.
    Being a veteran, knowing the M998 HMMWV to be what we called the HumVee, the civilian brand HUMMER, pretty much blows my mind, but in our collective state of Nationalism/Patriotism i am not at all surprised.
    Of course my Pug being powder coated OD Green just begs for the comment. all in all, it screams the oblivious mind we have as to the degree of discipline, skill, and simply just being what it is to soldier, and that of what it is to simply just live a life with the bicycle at core.
    do we all need to be combat vets to ride bikes? of course not. Do we all have to of had or have the experiences of racing bikes, the discipline of sport? Of course not. And of course I have yet to see one single Hummer out there pulling a M102 howitzer. In fact...I have yet to see a Hummer with Air Mobile loops outfitted.
    but all in all...i was amused, pleased, and optimistic from those inquiries of a bike. the basic opportunity to show the masses that you dont have to necessarily drive a car to get the groceries and that a simple life can be healthy, financially liberating, and most of all...that which appeals to most...”It’s so cool!” Look at the tyres!

    peace...d

    the pics:
    you can see how much space (=money) there is devoted to parking.
    typical bike rack, actually...usually there isnt a bike rack. so this is a luxury.
    how the Pug typically has to be locked.
    and 3 panniers worth of groceries. (not even fully stuffed)
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  103. #103
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    beach ride today

    went for a little spin along the beach today
    for those that dont know...
    when it comes to riding a beach, and there is a slant to the terrain, one of the best methods that i've come to know, is to simply stay as high up the slope as possible. Next thing you know, as you shimmy and slide, you end up next to the water.
    so typically I like to do zig zag pattern. the key is to keep the tyres square to the sand as much as possible. when you get them on edge, they tend to slip and slide, soon your tyre tracks look like something a sidewinder would have left. so i like to be intentional and change direction when I want to, rather than fighting the terrain. its mostly a matter of technique rather than skill or strenght.

    anyways...
    enjoy the pics.

    peace...d
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  104. #104
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    trucks...

    the other day i go out ot run my errands, and decide to take the Xtra, being that i really dont have much of an idea what im about to go buy, but in my mind, i'm thinking that picture frames are a really good probability.
    I get to a hardware store and here is this cammo F250 4x4 crew cab. wow! what a killer truck. the first thing that comes to mind, is that if it wherent painted cammo, it could be sold that much easier. then i look to see what's loaded in the bed...hhmm....tool box, spair wheel.
    then i look at the xtracycle.
    snap a pic...


    maybe for the new year, i should buy a car...


    peace...d
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  105. #105
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    Oh the monotony…
    Life is so hum drum…
    Blah blah blah blah…blah

    Every day is ride the bike…
    Over and over and over…ride, ride, ride, ride, ride
    The tyres go humm….buzzzzz
    The drizzle pitters patters
    I pedal, pedal, pedal…

    No shortage of finding time to ride…
    That is, cuz every thing I go do, I ride there to go do…
    Ride, ride, ride, ride, ride…

    Today was a bit of rain, I dropped the psi way down, had the panniers loaded up, and when rollin thru the slop.
    All in all, very fun…

    What I learned/played with today…
    SLOW rolling descent technique…
    On tiny single track, slippery with roots
    Panniers full
    Psi way down
    Between the roots slippery, sticky, clay
    The technique is to apply both brakes, and pedal at the same time
    Light pressure on the pedals, nice even round pedal strokes.
    Pick a gear with plenty of leverage…
    Moving slow, brake to the point where the front tyre likes to slide...
    Pedal pressure just enough to make the back tyre brake loose…
    Brake the rear wheel enough to keep the tyre rolling, not slipping…
    At the bottom or when you have to clear a ledge…
    Shift your weight more to the rear…dig the rear tyre into the ground…
    Let go of booth brake levers…
    Front wheel lofts.

    This is particularly fun, when riding things like deer trails, in the wet, with a bunch of weight, and then going up little 2ft ledges, roots, bogs, etc.
    It’s a game of momentum, and leverage.
    There is something fun about having the front wheel of the Pug in the air, with all the bags loaded, and the rear wheel squishing along its way, mooshing over rocks and branches, looking back and laffing at what you’d never think was possible to ride up, down, thru, or across…
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  106. #106
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    more of the same...

    its been more of the same...
    not much new in the routine...
    ride, work, ride, ride, work...shoot some pics

    my FAVORITE new piece of gear has got to be those "poggies" aka: handlebar mitts, made by "Moose Mitts".
    i toss a couple of chemical handwarmers in each one, and hands are so happy. lately its been consitently around 45F at night. with poggies, and suitable clothing, i dont even begin to think about getting cold. its an amazing thing.
    and to make matters all that much more cozy, they have velcro to close the ends when you get off the bike, which basically turns the mitts into nice little pouches (or ovens) that collect heat. its DELUXE!

    strange as it may be
    its the constant off and on of taking pics and riding the bike that gets the hands cold.
    its the camera time that lets you get cold.
    but with poggies...you can also just wear a set of cutoff gloves
    my fave are a set of DeFeet
    cutoff gloves let you retain the dexterity

    for those out there that have never used a set of poggies...
    well...my cycling life has changed
    simply amazing

    anyways...heres some new pics.

    the first pic is a jellyfish washed up on the beach...
    a buddy said to me, "WHAT IS THAT?!" it looks like silicone!
    lol
    i had a serious laff at that
    perhaps at some point in history this typical scene provided inspiration...
    or well...uhhh....
    ok...
    I'll leave it at that.
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  107. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo

    my FAVORITE new piece of gear has got to be those "poggies" aka: handlebar mitts, made by "Moose Mitts".
    i toss a couple of chemical handwarmers in each one, and hands are so happy. lately its been consitently around 45F at night. with poggies, and suitable clothing, i dont even begin to think about getting cold. its an amazing thing.

    First off, I love your posts and your pics! As an Army veteran, I love OD and think everyone should have an OD green bike. But...... I always gotta laugh when I see you with poggies when it's 45 degrees out. That's shorts and sweatshirt weather here in Iowa. So don't take offense, but I always get a good laugh out of it.


    Peace... Mojoe in Iowa.... whose Xtracycle is OD green.

  108. #108
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    oh ya!
    im loving poggies
    hot showers
    thermos
    and the intrinsic heat generating feature the Pug produces.

    and hey Mojoe...no offense taken...it is pretty damn funny i'm all into poggies

    i havent even seen frost yet!
    how crazy is that?

    lol

    peace...d
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  109. #109
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    coast line

    coast line...

    grocery store...
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  110. #110
    Devo
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    hopeless bike-aholic

    Hi my name is Devian...
    and...
    I'm a bike-aholic...

    so we all know this already
    well, today i decide to open up my storage space, what i call "the Malkovich"
    an lookie what i dun drug out.

    1994 Colnago Bititan complete with proper vintage Campy Record groupo and Shamals.

    Suddenly the Pug is sharin space with road bikes

    the other is a Fondriest with record, and a set of Zipp 404's

    for the last week, i've been on my Salsa Moto Rapido
    and let me tell you what a stupid freaking fast bike that thing is.
    SID, crossmax, blah blah blah...
    that bike is crazy fast
    almost stupid light too
    but i guess it holds up

    so here i am...
    livin in my loft, sleepin with my bikes and all the junk a junkie could dream of

    a Litespeed with SID that is going on eBay
    and probably a Bianchi DISS that i've still got in the Malkovich to eBay too

    bike-aholic

    peace....d
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  111. #111
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    yard sale

    this is the line up

    Colnago Bititan (on Ebay)
    Fondriest
    2 Bianchi DISS
    (one is a 19inch frame...going on ebay)
    Salsa Moto Rapido
    XtraCycle convert
    and of course

    The Pug
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  112. #112
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    Nice

    Wow...when I saw you post a pic of that Colnago, my first thought was "what a gorgeous bike, I wonder if he would sell it?". Very, very nice, something about a classic road bike. A bit out of my budget right now unfortunately.

    Btw, I hope you don't mind, but I copied the build on your Xtracycle; Cannondale frame with Speedcitys and large discs. I love that bike! Here's a pic of it loaded up with groceries.

    Cheers

    Kavurider
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    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  113. #113
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    Hey Kavurider

    thanks for compliment on the Colnago.
    i think i would sell it, but im not really sure.
    if someone actually bids on it...
    i'll start to trip out...
    maybe i'd just cancel the auction
    or maybe i'd let it go
    i could just keep it for another 10yrs, etc, blah blah blah

    Cdale Xtracycle converts.
    those are great bikes for sure.
    I bought the MP3 program (crash insurence) for the Speedcities
    i like the notion that Mavic is so confident in the quality of their product that they offer this program.
    I use my Xtra all the time.
    I especially like going to the store and buying a bunch of stuff, big stuff, and have people realize that I'm riding a bike and they ask, "how are you going to get all this on a bike?" i think its funny.
    you know...things like a case of soda
    huge jugs of laundry detergent

    or like the other day i went and picked up a dining table.

    Xtras are super cool.
    I sure wish for the Big Dummy

    i dont mind that you built your Cdale similar to the convert job i did.
    its great
    i think there should be more production bikes spec'd with 700c wheels.
    i believe that i read a set of 1.9 29er tyres will fit on a set of Speedcity's
    with that said...
    they are super versitle
    the possibilites go on and on

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  114. #114
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    I get the same reaction with the Xtracycle. In one night, I bought dress pants for work, then stopped at the store and bought a big jug of detergent, two gallons of water and groceries and the Xtra handled it no problem. Its a great tool for sure.
    The Speedcity's are tough wheels, I had them on a Kona Sutra that was totalled when I got hit by a truck. They were still true and I ended up selling them. So I'm not too worried about them on the Xtra. Plus, they're light, roll fast and look cool!
    I recently bought a 29'er and I'm probably going to put those 1.8 tires you are talking about on it (its my commuter bike currently). Bontrager, WTB and IRC make good, strong, cheap cross tires in that size.

    Cheers!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  115. #115
    Devo
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    for everyone out there:
    for sale stuff
    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles/iWeb/...or%20Sale.html
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    the Sutra....
    another fav bike of mine
    i have a hard time not buying it!

    right now im thinking of either buying a BOB trailer for my brother(s) or an Xtracycle
    my brothers live in Los Angeles, right close to Hollywood, and they dont own cars
    i sent a Trek Liquid last year and its been lasting them...
    there are a ton of bikes down there too...
    their bike pile is totally crazy...mostly just a bunch of cheapie bikes...destroyed
    and some old nice bikes too....destroyed of course
    the boys are super hard on bikes
    but as they get older they are calming down
    im 38, and my brothers are 32, 30, 28
    bikes abound...you name it...BMX, Freestyle, Lowriders, Cruisers, MTB's, commuters, etc...the list is crazy

    anyways...they are finally at a point where they are getting tired of life with a messanger bag, and making all those million tiny trips.
    Plus they are now needing to take on more household responsibilities, as the whole family lives together...so of course that means...groceries,etc. LIFE

    the BOB is an easy quick fix
    order it...and have it sent to LA

    the Xtra is a bit of a different story
    its more money
    and i'd have to have the whole kit sent to the closest bike shop
    you'd think that they'd be able to put stuff together, etc...
    but...my brothers have their issues :-/

    i use to dream about opening a bike shop/cultural center
    that is...
    a bike place of common ground that is about freedom of transport
    how a bike can be exactly that
    not just Sport...
    but Transport
    and have my brothers working there, showing them a healthy viable lifestyle
    but...
    its Los Angeles...its Hollywood...and they have their influences
    that alone, they cant seem to break
    especially since so many people live that life

    maybe one day

    Xtra's are definately a lifestyle revolution.
    its all that, which they say
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    this is my ebay stuff
    http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZasanacyclesQQhtZ-1


    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  116. #116
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    The Sutra is (was) an awesome bike. Steel frame, but not heavy, tons of braze ons and rack mounts. Adjustable dropouts. You name it. I even converted mine to a singlespeed and rode it on the trails here for a little while. So many options.
    That's cool that your brothers are into riding. No one in my family is but I found a good group of local riders, so I'm stoked.
    The Xtracycle sure does change your perception of bikes. I've never really seen them as toys but the Xtra is really a work horse. I'm constantly amazed by how much I can haul in it. I love my other bikes too (DH bike, FR bike, 29'er, trainer bike and now a roadie is on the way). Its great using them for fun AND utility.

    They have a bike co-op center in NY that does something similar to what you are proposing. I forget what its called.
    Great posts man, love reading them!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  117. #117
    ppp
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    [QUOTE=SelfPropelledDevo]this is the line up

    Colnago Bititan (on Ebay)
    Fondriest
    2 Bianchi DISS
    (one is a 19inch frame...going on ebay)
    Salsa Moto Rapido
    XtraCycle convert
    and of course

    The Pug[/QUOTE

    Please don't sell the colnago ! Please ...

  118. #118
    Devo
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    doubt that I'll part the Colnago
    its nice to see how people like the bike
    its getting pretty rare these days...
    much less to find one with proper vintage groupo and wheels.

    somehow in the back of my mind i keep seeing this bike with me...
    i think its one of those bikes, that one day when its 20yrs old, it could be on display at a bike rally of sorts, and to ride it!

    thanks for the feedback

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  119. #119
    Devo
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    yuppie? me? maybe...

    ok...
    so today i had to run some errands
    go up to work
    attend a meeting
    feed back, blah, blah, blah

    its another day on the bike
    today is an Xtracycle day, as a substantial grocery run was on the "to do" list
    the Xtra is too long to fit into the bike lockers that i regularly lock my bike(s) in, so i resort to using the bike rack.
    im not a big fan of this bike rack.
    its just a rack in the parking garage that is sitting in a parking space.
    its in public space to boot
    so really the bike is not all that secure
    well...
    i guess its actually VERY secure, being that its right under a survelliance cam and less than 50ft from the Security office.
    but you get my drift...its just the idea that its in the open...

    so i get to work roll into the garage
    get to the bike rack...
    and what do i find?
    uhhh??
    what the....?
    a Vanilla single speed road bike?!
    so there it is...
    the Cdale Xtra convert cabled to the movable bike rack
    along side this super pimp Vanilla road bike single speed
    and it dawns on me...
    as i look around...
    Porsches, a new Corvette, etc...
    uhhh....dude....uhhh...i think you might be a yuppie

    huh?
    me?
    a yuppie?
    uhhh....ya....look at the pic of all those bikes...
    right...
    me...
    yuppie?
    maybe a pseudo-hippy-hobo-yuppie on a bike...wonderin how i fit in this weird culture of mixed affluency

    as one of the members of the professional staff said to me one day, "you are the only adult i know that willingly chooses to not have a car."

    that pretty much sealed it for me
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  120. #120
    Spooooon!
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    Dude, sell those bikes! Possessions can be a prison if you let them take hold. Simplicity in everything is the way to go . . . but one extra road bike could't really hurt anyone, so keep the Colnago if you are torn.

    Check out the bamboo trailer if you are looking for a cheap and versatile transport option.http://www.carryfreedom.com/bamboo.html

  121. #121
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    I don't know if I agree with that.
    For years I wanted a certain DH bike frame. I looked and scrounged and waited patiently - I finally found it.
    Well, I came upon some hard times and sold it - to this day, I still regret it. I loved that bike so much. True, possessions can hold us prisoner, but they can also be seen as faithful companions, who are always there to cheer you up. That's how I see my bikes.

    If you have an emotional connection to the Colnago - don't sell it if you don't have to.
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  122. #122
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    Don't sell the Colnago!

    Thats one of the nicest road bikes I have ever seen. You will regret letting it go.

    ps. I think Surly should put twin downtubes on the Pugsley. Stop that wide bottom bracket from swinging around.

  123. #123
    Devo
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    i think its just a matter of time b4 i get rid of all that stuff.
    for the most part that part of cycling that the bikes themselves represent is long over for me
    i dont ride my SS bikes much anymore
    the road bikes just sit
    and in fact...even my Salsa sits a fair amount.

    basically all of that stuff is a by product of an evolution
    that is...
    an evolution in self sufficiency and ability.
    even an exploration into the various realms of social cycling, racing, etc
    an exploration in psyche
    and/or a spin off from military primary conditioning...
    i.e. did i really need to race 24hr solo?

    now days, my cycling is on the daily, as i dont own a car, and the bike has become a necessity. not so much of a recreation. and to top it all off, i keep assesing my situation, and keep thinking of taking time away from this typical life of a "townie".
    that is...
    i often think of being on the ramble...
    for an extended period of time.
    a few years...
    in that light...
    the bike is my prime mover
    and the morph/evolution in process will ultimately come down to 1 single bike.
    a bike that can carry what i care to portage
    and of course...
    its my own process that evolves to that point...
    that is...
    the minimalist approach?
    do i need a Big Dummy?
    a HT with panniers?
    or add a BOB trailer to any of the combo?
    how about a modular approach?
    that is...
    modality adustable to specific occasions?
    ohh...wait...
    that is what i have now (dont forget the pile-o-bikes)
    and the bike-aholic mind twists (i want a big dummy)

    so you see...
    the pile-o-bikes are not only just a pile of bikes
    but a representative time line of process
    which ultimately must go too

    that is...
    unless i let go of those hobo notions
    keep my job
    embrace the "townie" life that much more

    a kunundrum for sure...


    peace...d
    Last edited by SelfPropelledDevo; 01-27-2007 at 08:25 PM.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  124. #124

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    What was your military experience, if you don't mind sharing it?

    Larry

  125. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    i think its just a matter of time b4 i get rid of all that stuff.
    for the most part that part of cycling that the bikes themselves represent is long over for me

    basically all of that stuff is a by product of an evolution
    that is...
    an evolution in self sufficiency and ability.
    even an exploration into the various realms of social cycling, racing, etc
    an exploration in psyche
    and/or a spin off from military primary conditioning...
    i.e. did i really need to race 24hr solo?

    so you see...
    the pile-o-bikes are not only just a pile of bikes
    but a representative time line of process
    which ultimately must go too

    peace...d
    Great post! You hit the nail on the head.

    Ride on...
    Mojoe

  126. #126
    Devo
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    Ft. Ord

    I was stationed at Ft. Ord 87-91'
    i was in a cohort light artillery air assualt unit
    I went to Jungle school at Ft. Sherman, Panama
    Operation Just Cause
    PLDC
    and Combat leadership developement course
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    im 1/2 filipino and 1/2 white
    my dad (white) went thru ait on ord
    both my grandfathers went thru ord at some point
    my filipino gradfather's old baracks were just downt the street from DIVARTY (division artillery) and now the site is a frisbe golf course.

    my filipino grandfather was a comando fighting back in the Philipines during WWII
    my parents met at Ft. McClellan when my dad was out processing from vietnam. at the time my mom was stationed there. in dec of 68 i was born in Fresno.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    as a child i was conditioned by a military dicotomy
    my dad...typical hippie, drugs, etc...
    i grew up with violence
    imagine a white hippie with long blonde hair, married to a filipino girl, living in Fresno 1969, post-vietnam, with PTSD.
    and of course my filipino side of the family is very loyal, patriotic, and serving.
    my own dad's father, being of the time of the depression, is/was very conservative.
    he'd say things like..."no wonder we lost vietnam, bcz you all were stoned all the time."
    and my dad would say things like..."in WWII war was different. it was fought from trenches, and mostly at a distance. Vietnam was up close."

    as a kid, my room, my clothes, and the way i spoke to my elders, the way i went in an out of buildings was a mix of asain and military custom.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    i never realized this until the day in basic training we where taught how to fold socks, and make our bunks.
    i had never done anything otherwise in my whole life...
    until i got out of the Army.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    my military experience?
    its all that...
    its the living in a van with my dad on Rincon in Ventura,and up in the hills of Ventura, watching him smoke pot and hang out with all the HA (hells angels)
    its the pride and loyalty influence of my filipino family
    its my own inner programming that puts Duty above anything else
    its my commitment to community
    its going to Panama and firing a howitzer directly at a building full of "snipers"
    (later of which i believe to have learned was a military school) = this mission was in Rio Halto
    my experience is today working with vets and having the frustration of civilian life in common.
    the experience is being happy, being content in the moments when it really counts what you are doing. that i why i tend the ICU at work, thats why i'd ride off into the boonies on my own....
    its all of that...and more
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    the attached pic is what is visibly left of my old unit
    its on the end of our old motor pool
    everything disolves
    everything is expendible
    as for my bikes...
    well...its just stuff

    peace.....D
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  127. #127

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    Thanks for your story. I've always had tremendous respect for the military although I never served.

    Larry

  128. #128
    Devo
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    Im a mega consumer.

    looking foward to the next build, I'm pretty sure it will be the Big Dummy
    check out the latest of Surly blog posts.
    http://www.surlybikes.com/surlyblog.html

    for me...hopefully the Big Dummy will pan out to be something that will fit into my life(style)
    anticipating said change...
    the Cdale/Xtra convert i will probably send to my brothers in LA
    both single speeds will probably leave the stable
    as well as the Salsa (there is a good prbability)

    perhaps i should order one of those KM's (frame and fork) from Speedgoat
    swap parts from the Salsa, and add the Oldman Mountain 700c racks, along with a swap of SpeedCity wheelset from the Xtra convert.

    how many bikes do i need again?
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  129. #129
    Devo
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    well it looks like some eBay stuff is movin
    that is good
    i need to get rid of stuff
    on that note
    I've been kind of inspired to ride my SS
    34x16t with a cut down flat bar is work!
    lol
    and fast
    fast up hill
    well...
    faster than what im use to
    i forget how much i dig the SS
    and how it gives the rider instant feed back.
    of course no gears
    so the "gears" are in your legs
    in your form
    change in stroke
    maybe a spin if you are lucky
    start to bog down and try to use more of your calve muscles
    make sure to always remember to pull up
    and finally STAND
    stand and climb
    running on the pedals
    when the terrain gets real steep
    well...
    you have to just try to attack the climb
    basically a short sprint
    or...
    WALK
    lol
    today was just a run around town then to work...
    but i still have to make note...
    wow...
    that DISS is a sweet ride
    no wonder i ended up with 2 of them

    im spoiled
    im a yuppie
    im a mega consumer
    im conflicted
    hippie?
    yuppie?
    counter culture?
    hobo?
    no, no, no...
    dude...

    you know you've got it good when the biggest decesion of the day is...
    "what bike am i gonna ride today?"

    peace....d

    oh!
    wait...
    what the heck is this
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070129/...robotic_garage
    robotic parking?
    cars not bikes?
    if this dont say it all...
    i dont know
    all this energy and money devoted to...?
    parking cars?!
    that has to take the cake
    where are the bike racks?
    where are the bike lockers?
    where are the showers at work?
    geez...
    robotic parking garages...wow!
    obesity is that much more on the rise
    now what?
    people dont have to walk from their parking spaces?

    maybe Segway should go in biz with auto mfgs.
    just click your segway into positon...drive your car away...
    come to a stop...
    drive your segway out of your car
    and let the automated self parking car park itself in the robotic parking garage

    wow!
    what is next?
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  130. #130
    Devo
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    rummor is...
    Big Dummy is avail next month!
    whoa!
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  131. #131
    Devo
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    rummor is...
    Big Dummy is avail next month!
    whoa!
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  132. #132
    Devo
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    Bike life continues to trip me out.
    Lately its been the stuff I pick up off the side of the HWY.
    A cheapie digital camera
    And today was a carhart beanie
    A BMW R1200GS Adventure motored by…
    Thoughts of motorized transpo float thru my head…
    How ironic, how wrong is it that I entertain these notions simply to be able to go backpacking…
    I found myself looking at a 1998 Carrolla wagon for $2k that was listed on Craigslist
    Hmmm…a beater…
    to load my backpack, and go off into the Ventana?
    Its just too weird to necessitate buying a vehicle to go backpacking…
    It makes me think that this whole construct we’ve created it just backwards…
    How terrible that so much of our lives are car based activities…its pathetic

    As I make my daily commute up the HWY, the cars pass by, and I think to myself…
    Why a hospital is ontop of one of the highest points in the area?
    How much fuel is needlessly used to move 1 person at a time up the hill in their cars…
    Most of the cars only have 1 person in it.
    Its just too weird…

    As my $ stacks up more and more, I find myself looking at motorbikes and cars
    The BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Honda CBR1000RR
    Honda Fit
    The list goes on and on
    In the end of course these things are subject to disintegration
    They too will rust, rot and fade away…
    Of what value is there in these things?
    To work, and save to only let those efforts fade away gal per gal, mile per mile, day to day…as they’d rust, and fade…
    All the while I’d work and for what?
    To pay the gas?
    Pay the insurance?
    And for social recognition?
    “What would you roll?” is what I often see or hear
    “would you roll a Fit?” “what is a fit?”
    Blah blah blah…

    Now I hear that a person needs a passport to go to Mexico and/or Canada…
    Hmm…
    The other day someone tells me that their house is assessed every other year…
    Now they are working to pay for the equity…
    What is that saying?
    There are two things you can count on…
    Death and taxes.
    Are our freedoms slowly dwindling away?

    Can I even be a hobo?
    Or is it against the law to be a vagrant?
    Can I just ramble thru the Ventana for as long as I’d wish?
    What would the IRS say to “no job” and my $ stashed in the bank?
    Do I have to have a residence?
    Cant I just give all this up?
    What if I decided to not pay this cost of freedom?
    After all…I already did my service in the Army

    Well…it seems that our lives are becoming more and more accounted for.
    Advertising the most effective means of controlling people
    Telling us what to do…
    Carry a cell phone with a 911 chip
    Google Earth to virtually ramble the globe
    Log on to your inter net provider
    Check the mail
    Basically a method of “bed checks”
    And of course go vote
    A job to report to every day
    Taxes that take a bigger and bigger bite
    Estates fade away to new banks, paying those final heath care costs…
    Meanwhile, we send more and more jobs overseas…
    Domestic jobs that grow are the penal system and health care
    We don’t have a product to yield a harvest anymore
    Now we harvest from each other
    Behavior out of the construct of societal progress is a no no
    Its best to find a career work your days away…commit to a house, your estate
    That of course which you only would shortly actually own, if lucky
    The bank keeps the note…
    The employer keeps you…
    An advanced form of husbandry for sure…
    The bondage of a social system
    If a person isn’t too careful
    Their activities could quickly be deemed as illicit
    Their fates succumb to the penal system…

    Either way…a societal bondage
    I like to think that the bike gives us a bit of personal freedom...
    a chance to break those bonds.
    even if it is delusional.

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  133. #133
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    Another great post! Ever read Walden?? http://thoreau.eserver.org/walden00.html

    Jeff Potter, from Out Your Backdoor http://www.outyourbackdoor.com says:

    Right, and Americans go for the totally filtered, mediated,
    controlled, diluted, warped stuff instead of the unmediated
    liberation stuff. I mean, on bike/canoe/foot/XCski you can actually
    in fact be more yourself. There is less of someone else's
    idea/cashflow being inserted between you and your act. It's an
    objective difference. Americans prefer to be "kept," in other words.
    It's a voluntary and large amount of slavery. It fits with Marx's
    "self stupefaction" as a potential force that could derail history.
    Basically, I think we can't look ourselves in the mirror because of
    what we do so we put on masks that we buy...far more so than any
    other culture probably. (I wonder if any other of the top 10 all-time
    minds worked so hard at understanding the forces affecting
    stupefaction as Marx.)


    ****

    ****

    Mojoe

  134. #134
    Devo
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    thoreau, huxley, buddhism, some hinduism
    basically "perennial philosophy"
    is what i was raised on while living with my dad on the ramble in Ventura and Ojai

    then again 3yrs ago as i lived out of doors for a year and a half
    on the ramble thru the Ventana, Big Sur, etc
    but the difference was myself being solo
    with the military behind me
    and 2 marriages
    a job that let me decrease down to 5 days in a row, with 9 days off

    "in my mind i still need a place to go"---Neil Young

    out of doors grew to be lonely so i decided to return...
    as if an Indian returning to the shelter of the missions...
    to choose to work for my bread
    instead of picking up acorns from the ground
    choosing to pay for my designated sleeping quarters
    instead of laying down where i happened to be
    choosing to be with the PEOPLE.
    the people...
    this is where the people are.
    but...
    this is not where humanity is

    the girls typically get a laugh off of me
    we flirt
    they ask how much $ i save
    i tell them 2/3'rds my take home
    they ask when i'll buy a car
    the response is blank
    and i'm told im "counter culture"
    I'm unique...
    often i'm asked..."where do you come up with this stuff?"
    i tell them...
    High School
    ???
    its Thoreau...from my HS education

    mostly we go to work and volutarily relinquish our civil liberties...
    we consent and sign away our rights...
    to the extent that our breaks are just about gone
    meal periods are counted to the minute
    our freedome of speech is censored
    and God forbid you access freedom of information

    what is this we are turning into?
    at 30% of my pay how much am i willing to pay?
    meanwhile so many are over extened, in debt that they cant afford to quit their jobs
    or even choose otherwise
    their daily lives so busy
    that they must sleep to the clock
    and every moment b4 and after their jobs is filled with domestic duties
    therefore...
    once at work...
    its their moment of reprieve from the grind..
    but...
    in this job...
    a person should be fully present, and giving it their all
    that is until the situation is completely at hand
    instead they muck around
    and work life is a by product of procrastinations
    which inevetibly impacts/contributes to human suffering

    i think the culture is so overwhelmed and so far removed from freedom
    work ethic
    the ability to think
    well...the ablity to think, outside the thoughts of what to buy next
    or what vacation to go on next.
    i think the culture is looking for freedom, but they dont know what that is anymore
    including myself.

    adverstising and positive reinforcement are the most effective means of control
    its on TV i want it
    it feels good, i want it
    cars and obesity
    thats an easy example

    our culture, and humanity i believe to be innocent
    this is all the product of industry...
    we have worked so hard to create this
    but at this point...
    to me... it feels like self mutilation
    i still dont get it
    why does it take a husband and wife to work so many hours a year?
    and the kids are constantly needing family time
    the car constantly needs to be washed
    the bills stack up
    laundry
    trash
    dishes
    the dog?
    groceries...
    ahhhh!
    the list never ends

    i'll stop there....
    i can rant for pages and pages

    peace....d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  135. #135
    Devo
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    FYI

    check out some of the funky old school cartoons i posted from Vintage Tooncasts.

    "Stop driving us crazy"
    "Destination Earth"
    and
    "Man of Action"

    all posted on my website...
    kind of cool

    peace.......d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  136. #136
    Devo
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    global warming?

    uhh...

    today is about 80F

    holly smokes!

    what is that?
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  137. #137
    tl1
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    Enjoy it while it lasts

    We're around 80 degrees cooler in Southern Michigan.

    http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/...cast?query=ptk

  138. #138
    Devo
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    campy hubs fs

    here is a set of campy 8spd record hubs for sale
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Campagnolo-8spd-...QQcmdZViewItem

    a little vid about them
    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles/iWeb/...%20Hubset.html

    more stuff going...

    peace...d
    Attached Images Attached Images
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  139. #139
    Devo
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    cross post @ http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=270010


    howdy all:

    as you may or may not know
    there has been another bicyclist fatality here in Monterey.
    http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/mo...l/16686839.htm

    while we battle over trail usage(s), and train for up coming races
    focus on personal goals, etc.
    keep this guy and his family in mind.

    maybe think about how bikes fit into our culture
    maybe think about how we would like to see the bike in our community, how we'd like to see our society evolve.

    its a tragedy, its sad, and it blows my mind how these kinds of things happen.

    these days there are about 40,000 less cars than people in the USA.
    there are about 3 times the amount of registered vehicles compared to licensed drivers.
    last i knew there are about 44,000 fatalities in cars per year.
    i had also read somewhere that bicyclist fatalities have gone up 25% in the last 3yrs.

    as we all have experienced, the bicycle is a liberating machine.
    its a healthy lifestyle
    im asking for us to stop and take a moment, and think about how we can get away from the car.
    commute to work
    get groceries, or whatever
    you dont have to drive your car to ride your bike
    when that is the case there is something that needs to be addressed in our society

    go the Herald website listed above, check out the article and maybe make a post.
    we cannot continue to run each other over with our cars.

    just in the last few months a memorial was held for another Monterey cyclist that was fatally injured on the bike path from Seaside to Marina along HWY1 and the Ft. Ord Beach Range Rd.

    as cyclists, if we can generate the revenue the cycling industry has enjoyed from each and everyone of us, we should at least devote some energy to public safety.
    bikes can make a big change in our society
    obesity
    heart disease*
    environmental issues
    etc.

    its sad to see yet another cyclist killed by a car

    and if we start to think/accept cycling as only a recreation sport, next thing we know, we will be only allowed to ride at approved venues.**
    perhaps an annual license to ride in a particular area, much like boat registration or a fishing license
    and/or bikes would be banned from public streets.

    the scope of cycling has many fronts
    i feel, i believe that the right to safe passage on public roads, and to set an example, teach a way, of simple living that is rich in lifestyle is fundamental.

    of all things in our society...
    what is more efficient?
    the way we live our lives is our greatest statement.


    my heart goes out to Daniel Vasquez and family.

    peace...d


    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the human race." H.G. Wells
    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles/iWeb/...s/Welcome.html
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  140. #140
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    Vehicle Code

    Godspeed to Daniel Vasquez and all who knew him.

    "Driving is a privilege and not a right!" were the very first words out of my driver ed teacher's mouth way too many years ago. Yet how many licenses are revoked permanently for serial transgressions against the vehicle code? Not too many: I personally know people with multiple at-fault accidents (including with injury) and others with several DUIs- including felony DUI- who've retained their driver's license. Something is dreadfully wrong there somewhere!

    Increasingly, driving is viewed as a de facto right, an entitlement, and not a privilege.

  141. #141
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    That's the name of the game today: entitlement.

    My condolences to the family for losing a loved one - I cringe whenever I hear of a cyclist going down.

    Stay safe out there everyone.

  142. #142

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    A real tragedy. Innocent life wiped away.

    Larry

  143. #143
    Devo
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    David Bowie I'm Afraid of Americans Lyrics
    Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny's in America
    Low techs at the wheel
    Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Nobody needs anyone
    They don't even just pretend
    Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny's in America

    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans

    Johnny's in America
    Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny wants a brain
    Johnny wants to suck on a Coke
    Johnny wants a woman
    Johnny wants to think of a joke
    Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny's in America
    Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah

    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans

    Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah

    Johnny's in America
    Johnny looks up at the stars
    Johnny combs his hair
    And Johnny wants ***** and cars

    Johnny's in America, Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny's in America, Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah

    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans

    God is an American
    God is an American

    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the world
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't

    Yeah, I'm afraid of Americans
    I'm afraid of the words
    I'm afraid I can't help it
    I'm afraid I can't
    I'm afraid of Americans

    Johnny's an American
    Johnny's an American

    Johnny's an American, Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny's an American, Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny's an American, Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    Johnny's an American, Ah-ah-ah-ah ah-ah ah-ah-ah
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  144. #144
    Devo
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    > ....and where was it that long time vet Wayne Sewell
    > was struck and killed?
    > On a remote road, out in Ft Ord (no longer remote,
    > but still was, then).
    >
    > We risk everything every time we ride our bikes on
    > roads with simple
    > minded, easily distracted, angry people driving
    > vehicles. Not much you can
    > do. It is all about the odds and keeping your
    > survival instincts on all the
    > time. I will ride until it becomes physically too
    > difficult as a result of
    > old age or I die. In the interim I will do my little
    > bit to improve
    > conditions for cyclist. So be it.>
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    why does it come down to this?
    where is the civility?
    where is the morality?
    where is the humanity?
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    i was 11yo when i met my first lawyer, as my parents were going thru a divorce.
    Dale Givner, "there is no such thing as Justice. Just Chance."
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    i think i concur with the statement that the masses are simpy a sum of individuals.
    individuals with their own concerns, daily life.
    as a society we are fragmented.
    I'm not accoustomed to that.
    i still have that naivete
    where i envision people having a say in how our culture/society evolves.
    i still think that our voices are heard when we go vote.
    that at anytime we can get together and speak up.
    evidently we cant simply send email
    and the subject is too obscure
    not even applicable to our society.
    a toppled stop sign warrants/has more grounds to be addressed than the obscure concept of "Overt Car Dependency"
    check this out:
    http://www.tcd.ie/ERC/pastprojects/c...ort%20Rich.pdf
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    as we all have our own priorities in life
    bicycle safety and a conscious shift from our Pop Amerikana love affair with the car is too far away, we cant afford to ride to work, we simply dont have the time, we live too far away, and how would the kids get to school.
    long gone are the days when kids played in the streets, rode their bikes all over town.
    now we have Kids Cab, drive to soccer practice, drive to irish step dancing, drive here and there. Kids know "Starbuck lingo" as they order from the drive-thru.
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    i can hear my dad's voice as a kid when he taught me about gears, mechanical efficiency, and how the bike can be a huge thing.
    "Only in the United States are bikes considered toys."
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    the bicycle is thriving in a department with volleyballs, lawn darts, hockey sticks, and water wings. as we grow into adulthood, bikes are sold in "bicycle boutiques".
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    in those days, it was a Schwinn 10speed that i learned how to ride away from daily madness everyone else engaged in. even then...i wondered why more people just dont choose a simpler life. why pay so much for a car, the gas, etc.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    i was 14 when i had first saved up $500 for a new moped. Worked with my grandfather painting houses. One day my buddy David, 13yo, bet me $5 that he could beat me and my moped from his house to the liqour store on his new BMX bike that he had bought with his paper route money. I histarically laffed at my stupidity to work so much for that thing. then when we decided to take turns time trialing around the block switching between moped and bike, it was obvious that in the last few months i had "lost my game". David was much faster than i on the bike, and the skill to "drive" moped was negligible.

    however...it allow me to go wash dishes til midnight at a local restuarant. pay taxes on my $3.35/hr, pay for registration, buy gas, and the girls did respond to a ride on the moped to one of Ventura's beaches, where we'd inevitably fool around, making like grown ups, aspiring to our own residence where we too could raise a family, watch tv, drive cars, etc....

    the innocence and naivete of the bike was lost in a mix of 2 stroke oil, money and junior high hormones.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    its sad to see us running around so frantically every day. bound to our cars, such to the extent that bikes are viewed as they are.
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    a paradigm shift will never occur.
    we have fallen in love with our captures.
    the car holds us hostage.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    media mentions what make of car struck a bicyclist
    never do they mention the make of bike
    and how is any of that even relevent?
    cars are too dangerous
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    everyday i look around at my fellow neighbors, and the reality is sinking in more and more...
    that is...
    very few people could actually ride a bike.
    the phrases "its as simple as riding a bicycle", "its like riding a bike, once you learn you never forget."
    we have evolved too far from those OLD phrases.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    today i'm left staring at the ground
    what else can we say?
    its just sad.
    this is our collective decision
    gas will always be subsidized
    they boys will always grow up wanting a muscle car
    the girls will ooggle those achievements
    while we we enslave ourselves to a torment that destroys our environment.
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    man is far from enlightened
    --------------------------------------------------------
    and i have a difficult time going with the flow
    just bcz everyone else does it...
    does it make it right?
    i dont have to do it.
    i'll make my say, even if it is of no avail
    -------------------------------------------------------
    cars-r-coffins
    ------------------------------------------------------

    peace....d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  145. #145
    Devo
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    this is crazy cool!
    http://www.tcd.ie/ERC/pastprojects/c...ort%20Rich.pdf

    The Transport Rich and the Transport Poor:
    Car dependency and social class in four European cities
    James Wickham
    Maria Lohan
    Employment Research Centre
    Department of Sociology
    Trinity College Dublin
    Paper for conference
    ‘Urbanism and Suburbanism at the End of the Century’
    Friday, November 26th and Saturday, November 27th, 1999
    National University of Ireland, Maynooth
    1
    1. Introduction
    Today Dublin's transport crisis is hardly news: the growing traffic jams and the
    lengthening commuting times, are, with the childcare crisis and spiralling house
    prices, the most obvious elements of the downside of Ireland’s economic boom. Yet
    one curious aspect of the transport crisis is that it is assumed to affect all Dubliners
    equally. Transport and traffic become a technical issue for both transport engineers
    and all of us as amateur road planners, and the relationship between transport and
    social structure becomes occluded. In this paper by contrast we shall argue that
    transport is related to social inequality. We shall do this by putting Dublin in first its
    global and then its European context, using material from our research project
    SceneSusTech ('Scenarios for a sustainable society: car transport systems and the
    sociology of embedded technologies').
    The paper begins by outlining how car dependency is interwoven with two aspects of
    social structure, anomie and social exclusion. This will involve separating two terms,
    social inclusion and social cohesion, that are often treated as identical.
    The next section of the paper outlines the research project SceneSusTech, a
    comparative study of the ‘car system’ in four European cities: Athens, Bologna,
    Dublin and Helsinki. It summarises the first stage of the project which argued that
    while Athens and Dublin can be taken as ‘worst case’ cities in terms of car
    dependency, Bologna and in particular Helsinki represent ‘best practice’ in terms of
    transport policy.
    The main part of the paper moves from comparing entire cities to comparing different
    areas within the four cities. It shows that extremes of car dependency can exacerbate
    social exclusion and that this is exemplified by the experience of Dublin's suburban
    working class areas.
    2. Cars, anomie and social exclusion
    Our argument is derived from the social shaping of technology tradition. Much work
    here has concentrated on the design of the car itself. Yet once a technology is fixed in
    a determinate product which is sold - perhaps in large numbers - as a discrete
    commodity, then the technology itself becomes a ‘black box’. A whole system of
    transport, marketing, distribution and sales is used to sell the product anywhere in the
    globe. The process of commodification is therefore not a process of ideology as in
    much Marxist writing, but a very concrete set of social institutions. These turn the
    artefact into a commodity, thus disconnecting it from its origins and so freezing the
    technological choices it embodies. Commodification makes products independent of
    any social location, it is a process of Verselbständigung. Robin Williams has shown
    how the social choices in software products become reduced as the technology
    becomes ‘black boxed’. The options involved in the product become hidden under
    the shrink wrapping. Users can certainly apply Windows 95 in a multitude of ways1,
    but they cannot influence its design. By contrast, bespoke software is relatively open
    to social choices as different potential users can directly influence the way it is
    developed (Williams 1995). And of course the car is a global commodity. Cars are
    the same the world over.
    However, cars are part of a wider system, which ranges from the roads to the many
    social institutions which car transport involves. Such a car system is an assemblage of

    1
    Of course, compared to many other black boxed technologies, contemporary
    software has a very wider range of potential uses, many of which are unplanned by
    the actual designers.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    2
    different entities, only some of which are commodified and only some of which are
    discrete physical products. As such the car system displays a variation that is much
    more immediately socially shaped than the individual car. And arguably it is the car
    system, rather than the car itself, which really matters. To analyse just the car is as
    absurd or as limited as to analyse railways in terms of the steam engine alone.
    Sometimes all members of society have to own and use a car in order to carry out
    their normal activities The importance of the right to own and use a car in all
    advanced societies is shown by the fact these rights are probably part of what adult
    members of advanced societies consider as citizenship: passing a driving test is a far
    more important social ritual today than exercising the vote for the first time! This
    focus on the system rather than the individual commodity ensures that we do not
    psychologise car dependency and under-estimate its social bases. All too often
    people’s usage of cars is understood in terms of status symbols and consumption,
    rather than in the simple sense that without a car people cannot get to work, get their
    children to school, go shopping, etc. The car system enables people to do some things
    (take the children to school) and constrains them from doing other things (allowing
    their children to walk to school). It faces individual actors as a physical system (the
    layout of the roads) and a set of constraints and opportunities which is - in the short
    run - impossible to change. Like the freeway bridges that prevented inner city blacks
    from reaching the beaches of Long Island (Winner, 1980), the car system appears
    obdurate.
    While cars are important to social life in all advanced societies, there is considerable
    variation in the extent to which the car is actually essential. There are in other words,
    variations in car dependency. Car dependency varies by task: people may have to use
    their car to get to work, but not need to use it for shopping. The extent of car
    dependency is not just the result of the car system itself. It also depends on the public
    transport system and the form of land use. The extent to which people can, let alone
    will, use public transport instead of their car depends on the form and level of
    transport provision. Thus a public transport system that is simply a series of radial
    routes from the city centre provides a very different service to a system that where the
    network takes the form of a grid. Other obvious issues here include the extent to
    which the system is actually configured as a system for the individual user: how easy
    is interchange between modes, is there inter-ticketing, are there even clear route
    maps? The frequency, regularity and reliability of the service is important, as is of
    course the mix of the modes itself (users find buses less comfortable than heavy rail,
    light rail and trams). And last but not least, there is the issue of price and the extent to
    which cities subsidise their public transport.
    Car dependency is also shaped by land use, for this above all determines the extent to
    which people need to be mobile at all. The simplest issue here is the extent to which
    housing and employment are separated and how they are located relative to each
    other. In early industrial cities, nearly all workers walked to work: the proletarian
    tenements surrounded the mines and factories. Today an increasing number of
    professionals choose to live within walking distance of their work in the city centre, a
    process which is part of the gentrification of the inner cities. And of course,
    information technology is enabling more people to work at home. For most people
    however, work requires a substantial journey. Planning laws and the nature of the
    housing market determine the extent to which housing is accessible only by car.
    Equally, the growth of office parks and out of town shopping malls generates car
    traffic for these places are usually unreachable in any other way. Other traffic
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    3
    generators include public facilities, above all hospitals but also educational
    institutions, as well as other transport nodes, above all airports.
    Car dependency thus depends on the way the car system proper is related to public
    transport provision and land use planning. All of these are socially and indeed
    politically shaped. Their form and their inter-relationship depend upon overt
    decisions and implicit ideologies which are extremely amenable to social analysis.
    Of course, social life depends on many other technologies apart from just the car. Car
    dependency has become overtly problematic not because of dependency per se, but
    high car usage is seen to threaten the environment and because traffic congestion is
    frustrating and expensive.
    Nonetheless, there are two social aspects of car dependency which arguably are
    important for understanding the role of the car in contemporary society. They show
    how car dependency is not neutral: it effects the type of society in which people live
    and it effects different people in different ways. And as we shall see later, these are
    important for the particular form car dependency takes in particular cities.
    The argument that follows makes a distinction between social cohesion and social
    inclusion. Each of these can be thought of as one end of a continuum describing
    features of social structure. If social cohesion describes a situation where members
    of society feel mutual obligation and responsibility for each other, a situation where
    this does not apply is one of anomie, where people act in purely selfish and
    individualistic terms. By contrast, social inclusion describes a situation where all
    members of society have adequate resources to fully participate in the life of society.
    By contrast, social exclusion is that process whereby some people are kept out of the
    mainstream of society, in particular because they lack resources. Social inclusion /
    exclusion thus involves social inequality, while social cohesion / anomie does not.
    In terms of social cohesion there is a clear relationship between car dependency and
    the quality of social life. Universal car ownership was seen until recently as part of
    the achievements of contemporary consumer society. In fordist society ‘universal’ car
    ownership meant that every family had a car; in contemporary post-modern society it
    means that every individual has a car2. But widespread car usage in cities destroys
    public space and facilitates the creation of privatised public space. As Rogers
    describes the world of American shopping malls: 'The car-choked streets are left to
    the poor and unemployed, while the wealthy workers shop and do business in air-
    conditioned comfort and security'. (Rogers 1997). What Apel and Pharaoh (1995)
    call ‘carurbanity’ is incompatible with urbanity. As cars take over the world outside
    the house, it less and less an area for public sociability - the key characteristic of city
    life. Hence radical architects and town planners have for decades tried to stem the
    advance of the car. Hence too the well developed tradition of aesthetic criticism of
    car dependency.
    At a more general level, widespread car usage creates many situations where
    individuals can act irresponsibly without cognisance of social obligations - from
    explicit road rage through to the implicit anti-social behaviour of fast and noisy
    driving, where the individual is ‘carcooned’ from the consequences of his (less
    usually her) actions. Whereas Elias (1995) saw the long term decline of road
    accidents as an another example of the ‘civilising process’,3 car usage now appears as

    2
    In a similar way, the mobile phone means that every individual can have their own
    phone: private phones are no only accessible through a households.
    3
    We are grateful to Stephen Mennell for alerting us to this argument.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    4
    part of a process whereby social bonds are loosened.4 The ‘great car society’
    promulgated by Mrs. Thatcher is an oxymoron. Where everyone uses a car, then
    social cohesion is undermined.
    Secondly, there is the relationship between car dependency and social exclusion.. If
    all adults can own and use a car, then a completely car dependent society does not
    exclude anyone. A car society can be inclusive even if not cohesive. As far as the
    adult population is concerned, the only relevant aspect of the car for social inequality
    is that poorer income groups are constrained to spend a disproportionate share of their
    income on a capital asset in order to have any mobility. However, such complete
    universal car ownership is unlikely. Even in the most affluent societies, universal car
    ownership still means one car per household, so that for many poorer households
    adults are in competition for use of the car. However, in the USA, and increasingly in
    Europe, women and men are equally likely to have a driving licence. Although one
    might assume that even then men would win out in any competition for access to the
    car, the question of gender inequality in such a situation is probably best posed as an
    empirical issue. It is however clear that since carurbanity means that cities are
    designed for those with cars, those who are too young or too old to drive are excluded.
    For example, children cannot ride a bicycle to school or play on the street, since cars
    have made these activities too dangerous. Conventional policies in road safety of
    course exacerbate this situation by segregating cars and pedestrians and by training
    children to learn that cars are dangerous.
    There is considerable, if anecdotal evidence that hazards associated with cars tend to
    fall disproportionately on the poor, although not in a completely linear way. For
    example, localised pollution caused by cars owned by suburban commuters falls on
    inner city communities (for summary of evidence, see Whitelegg, 1993). Notice that
    this means that the working class suburban estates typical of North West Europe are
    not effected in this way. Although there is little systematic evidence on the
    relationship between social class and car deaths, it is clear that the poor are
    particularly likely to be amongst pedestrians (both adult and children) killed and
    wounded by cars. Notice again however that this is to do with location in the first
    instance - poor people are disproportionately present in the inner city areas through
    which suburban car owners drive en route to work or leisure.
    The key connection between car dependency and social exclusion occurs through
    access. In many European cities, particularly in North West Europe, suburbanisation
    means that people have only the most basic facilities within walking distance. Shops,
    entertainment, even employment itself is located either in another suburb and as such
    almost impossible to reach except by car, or in the city centre which may be far away
    and only reachable by a rather limited public transport system. While this may not
    pose problems for car-owners, it does for everyone else. Suburbanisation has occurred
    as if everyone who lived in the suburbs had a car, yet this is manifestly not the case.
    While ‘suburbanisation’ initially meant the location of housing, it now includes
    shopping, entertainment, education and employment. For such facilities to be
    accessible to those without cars they need to be concentrated at nodes of an expanded
    public transport system. In other words, car dependency can only be contained by the
    integration of transport policy and land use policy.

    4
    Here we are distinguishing between social INCLUSION and social COHESION;
    much contemporary discussion conflates the two.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    5
    3. The urban politics of car dependency
    Project SceneSusTech5 studies the social implications and political feasibility of a
    move towards sustainable mobility in European cities. This involves analysing the
    causes and consequences of ‘car dependency’, that is to say, the way in which the
    private motor car - with all its negative environmental consequences - has become
    indispensable to people’s daily lives. The core of the research is a comparative study
    of four European cities: Athens, Bologna, Dublin and Helsinki. Athens and Dublin
    represent high levels of car dependency and its associated environmental damage,
    Bologna and Helsinki are rather closer to sustainable mobility.
    The project began by comparing levels of car usage in different cities across the
    globe. While the four case study cities do already appear here, they are simply
    compared to other cities on some aggregate variables (above all, the proportion of
    journeys to work which rely on the car). The purpose of this stage of the research was
    to assess the extent to which car usage varies between cities. To the extent that such
    variation exists, it suggests that car dependency may not be inevitable but instead can
    be reduced by public policy. Very simply, this stage of the research concluded that if
    car usage is defined simply as the proportion of journeys to work which are made in
    private cars, then car usage cannot be explained by a city’s wealth or by a city’s
    population density. For example, in 1990 Athens and Dublin were poorer than
    Bologna and Helsinki, but their inhabitants were more reliant on the private car to get
    to work. Equally, Dublin and Helsinki have similar population densities, but in
    Dublin car usage is higher than in Helsinki. Charts 3.1 and 3.2 present the basic data.
    Figure 3.1 Wealth and Journey to work: 40 cities
    Source: SceneSusTech; Kenworthy at al
    GVP/GRP
    50000400003000020000100000
    J
    tW
    %
    p
    r
    iv
    a
    te
    100
    80
    60
    40
    20
    0
    Cities grouped
    Developing Asia
    Wealthy Asia
    Europe
    USA
    Australia
    Total Population
    Athens
    Bologna
    Helsinki
    Dublin

    5
    The project is supported by the EU DG12 Targeted Socio-Economic Research
    (TSER) RTD Programme, Contract no. SOE1-CT97-1071. The project is co-
    ordinated by the Employment Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin. The other
    partners are Unit of Social Policy (USP), University of Jyväsklylä, Finland; Instituto
    Ricerche Economiche e Sociali (IRES), Rome, Italy; Institute of Urban and Rural
    Sociology, National Centre for Social Research (IURS) Athens, Greece.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    6
    Figure 3.2 Population density and journey to work: 40 citiesPopulation Density and Travel to Work
    pop. Density
    100806040200
    J
    tW
    %
    p
    r
    iv
    a
    te
    100
    80
    60
    40
    20
    0
    Cities grouped
    Wealthy Asia
    Europe
    USA
    Australia
    Athens
    Bologna
    Helsinki
    Dublin
    The next stage of the research was a social history and political sociology of the car
    system in each city. We began by tracing the histories of public transport and the car
    system in each of the four cities. This suggested that much of the difference between
    the cities can be understood in terms of technological trajectories – at certain points
    the city is launched down a development path which then becomes ‘normal’ within
    the city and difficult to change. Conversely, it is possible to identify ‘switching
    points’, points at which the entire trajectory is questioned and altered. For example,
    in Helsinki the Smith-Polvinen plan of the 1960s foresaw the city transformed into a
    motorised city dominated by urban motorways. The resulting public outcry forced a
    re-orientation of policy towards revitalising public transport. Dublin may well be at a
    similar juncture today.
    This histories are accounts ‘from the outside’: they describe what happened, but do
    not explain how it happened. Used methods from political sociology we therefore
    attempted to open this ‘black box’ of urban decision-making. In each city we
    analysed two cases of decision-making, one which appeared to enhance sustainable
    development (in Dublin the light rail Luas), the other which enhanced car dependency
    (in Dublin the Liffey Valley Shopping Centre). These case studies showed how
    successful urban transport policies depend upon strong regional and urban
    governments with the financial and administrative resources to make relatively
    independent decisions.
    Strong local government provides the context for another component of a successful
    transport policy, namely an urban coalition or ‘policy network’ of diverse interest
    groups which share a basic strategic vision of the city and of the role of urban
    transport. According to our research in Bologna and Helsinki the original impetus for
    a revival of public transport came from the political left in the 1970s, but that over
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    7
    time this policy had become common to most major actors in the city. Thus in
    Helsinki we can identify a political consensus which identifies the city with its rail
    system. In this context individual economic actors (e.g. property developers) align
    their plans with those of the city and so ensure the success of the overall policy.
    Conversely in Dublin, the original overground Luas project was supported by a
    diverse coalition of interest groups, but this was easily over-ridden by central
    government.
    The next stage of the project aimed to study the relationship between urban social
    structure and the car system in each city. To what extent does the car system
    differentially facilitate and constrain different groups of people? It is this stage of the
    research which therefore focuses on the relationship between car transport and social
    exclusion. This involves zooming in on three different case study areas within each
    case study city. In each case study city three distinct urban areas were selected,
    broadly characterised as suburban middle class, low income suburban, and inner city
    middle class. The total project therefore collected data on 12 areas. This stage of the
    research therefore allows us to make comparisons between similar areas within
    different cities. For example, what is the impact of the very different transport
    policies of Dublin and Helsinki on similar working class areas in the two cities? Is it
    the case that the working class area of Dublin is particularly disadvantaged because of
    Dublin’s high level of car dependency?
    Chart 3.3: Case study areas
    Working class
    peripheral Middle classperipheral Inner cityprofessional
    Athens Agioi Anargiroi
    (30,700) Polidrosson/a Kolonakin/a
    Bologna La Barca
    (20,500) Bolognina(c 33,200) Centro Storico(55,500)
    Dublin Jobstown
    (7,300) Clonskeagh(1,800) North Docklands(1,200)
    Helsinki Kontula
    (12,600) Lansi-Pakila(6,500) Taka-Toolo(14,300)
    Research at the local level enables us to investigate the form of transport people use
    in its particular spatial context. Furthermore, at this level it is possible to locate what
    facilities are available (shops, entertainment, etc.). This enables us to link questions
    of mobility (how people move around) with questions of accessibility (what people
    can reach). Furthermore, it is only by focusing on the contextualised individual that
    we can investigate another of our guiding assumptions, namely that car dependency
    has social consequences. Thus the original proposal argued that cities which are car
    dependent are likely to exclude the poor – even if poor families have cars, poor
    individuals are less likely to own cars. And those without cars cannot reach ‘normal’
    facilities or only can do so by using inadequate public transport. By contrast, in a
    city that is not car dependent, facilities can be reached by everyone, whether or not
    they have a car.
    This stage of the research began with an ethnographic study of each area. Apart from
    collecting any existing secondary material (research reports, population statistics,
    pollution data), fieldwork involved visiting the area and driving and walking around,
    as well as preferably using public transport; interviewing key informants, ranging
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    8
    from town planners to local taxi drivers; taking photographs. The results confirmed
    the key hypothesis of the project in relation to social exclusion. La Barca, Jobstown
    and Kontula are all areas of public housing built in the 1970s. At one extreme the
    well developed transport system of Helsinki provides a form of ‘transport welfare’
    (Helsinki report). Kontula in Helsinki is a working class suburban area with high
    unemployment, yet good transport facilities link it to the city centre and to other areas
    of the city. At the other extreme in Jobstown in Dublin poverty and unemployment
    are exacerbated by poor public transport. Furthermore, facilitates for shopping and
    sport are almost non-existent, so residents have to travel further than in Kontula even
    though transport provision is less.
    The research continued with a questionnaire-based social survey in each area. This
    provides the data for the next section of this paper. Research in each area concluded
    with a series of focus groups with local residents. At the time of writing (November
    1999) we are starting the final stage of research in which we use our fieldwork results
    as part of the process of constructing scenarios for transport policy in each of the four
    cities in interaction with the city’s policy makers.
    4. Counting people out – car dependency and social exclusion
    For this paper the survey is used to examine the relationship between car usage and
    social exclusion. While much public commentary talks about ‘the motorist’ or ‘the
    public transport user’, our concern is to see what if any is the relationship between
    these terms and social inequality. In what ways is car usage related to social
    inequality? Does living in a car dependent city make non-car owners more
    disadvantaged than in a less car dependent city?
    As Table 3.3 has shown, the sample areas were very different in size. Furthermore,
    they were selected as representing different areas of each city, where the area is
    defined both in terms of class (‘middle class’ or ‘working class’) and location
    (‘suburban’ or ‘inner city’). The areas are not therefore ‘representative samples’ from
    each city and it is not possible to aggregate the results from different areas. The
    survey results are therefore always reported here in terms of all 12 areas. The areas
    can be compared with each other both within cities (e.g. ‘working class suburban
    Dublin’ and ‘middle class suburban Dublin’) and across cities (‘working class
    suburban Dublin’ and ‘working class suburban Helsinki’). The key purpose of the
    survey was to compare different areas of our case study cities. The sample was
    therefore designed to be representative of each individual area, not of the city as a
    whole. Each case study area was divided into two or three further sub-areas so that the
    differences within the area were represented in the sample. Within each sub-area
    individuals were selected for the sample by a random walk, with equal quotas for
    women and men, and a total of 50 respondents in each area. In Bologna it was
    possible to increase the intended sample to 100 respondents in each area. Full details
    of the sampling procedure used in each city are contained in the Appendix.
    4.1 The areas: employment and social class
    Table 4.1 Areas by social class
    Service Inter-
    mediary Working Total
    Athens (W) 35.0 25.0 40.0 100.0
    Athens (W) 35.0 25.0 40.0 100.0
    Athnens (M) 22.6 67.7 9.7 100.0
    Athnens (M) 22.6 67.7 9.7 100.0
    Athens (I) 87.5 6.3 6.3 100.0
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    9
    Bologna (W) 20.8 32.1 47.2 100.0
    Bologna (M) 17.3 40.4 42.3 100.0
    Bologna (M) 17.3 40.4 42.3 100.0
    Bologna (I) 25.0 36.4 38.6 100.0
    Bologna (I) 25.0 36.4 38.6 100.0
    Dublin (W) 6.3 12.5 81.3 100.0
    Dublin (W) 6.3 12.5 81.3 100.0
    Dublin (M) 42.9 25.0 32.1 100.0
    Dublin (M) 42.9 25.0 32.1 100.0
    Dublin (I) 25.0 46.9 28.1 100.0
    Dublin (I) 25.0 46.9 28.1 100.0
    Helsinki (W) 15.8 36.8 47.4 100.0
    Helsinki (W) 15.8 36.8 47.4 100.0
    Helsinki (M) 56.3 28.1 15.6 100.0
    Helsinki (M) 56.3 28.1 15.6 100.0
    Helsinki (I) 54.8 22.6 22.6 100.0
    Helsinki (I) 54.8 22.6 22.6 100.0
    Table 4.1 shows the social class composition of the areas. ‘Social class’ is derived
    simply from the occupation given by those respondents who reported that they had a
    job. This occupation was coded according to the International Standard Classification
    of Occupations. These were then aggregated into a three-fold ‘Goldthorpe’ schema.
    The ‘service class’ comprises professional and managerial occupations, including
    large proprietors, ‘intermediary’ comprises routine white collar, technical and sales
    staff, while ‘manual’ comprises all manual occupations. The results presented in
    Table 4.1 are necessarily very crude, in particular because they take no account of
    either gender or household structure.
    In all four cities the area that we had designated as ‘working class’ does in fact have
    the highest proportion of ‘working class’ occupations. The high proportion of service
    class occupations in the Athens working class area probably occurs because our
    coding scheme allocates all self-employed people to the ‘service class’, and in Athens
    this will include many small artisans. It is also noticeable how Dublin emerges as the
    most socially segregated of all our four cities, at least in terms of the extent to which
    the working class area is a one class area. Thus working class occupations comprise
    80% of all relevant respondents in the Dublin working class area, as opposed to only
    47% in both Bologna and Helsinki and 40% in Athens.
    The areas also have different age profiles. In line with the different national
    demographic structures, overall the Dublin areas tend to have a higher proportion of
    young people (18-24) and Helsinki a higher proportion of older people (65+).
    Furthermore the survey results are also in line two demographic peculiarities of two
    inner city areas reported from ethnographic and census material: inner city Athens
    has an unusually high proportion of older people, and inner city Helsinki a high
    proportion of young people.
    Finally employment in the different areas for the age group 18-64 also shows
    considerable variation. In line with current EU practice the focus here is on
    employment per se, i.e. part-time and full-time employment is collapsed into one
    category. This shows considerable variation between the areas: from a low of 43% in
    Athens (W) to a high of 85% in Athens (I). As expected, the gender gap in
    employment is far lower in Helsinki than in the other cities, with working class
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    10
    Dublin closer to the two southern cities where many women are not in the workforce,
    while the other two Dublin areas are closer to Helsinki.
    4.2 Cars, class, gender and age
    The survey results remind us of the sheer normality of car ownership in European
    cities. In virtually every area, the majority of households have a car. There are
    however significant variations. With the exception of the ‘working class’ suburb of
    La Barca in Bologna, in each city the middle class area has the highest proportion of
    household car ownership. In every city, the inner city area has the lowest proportion
    of household car ownership.
    Table 4.2 Car ownership by household
    % households with car
    Athens (W) 75
    Athens (W) 75
    Athens (M) 90
    Athens (M) 90
    Athens (I) 68
    Athens (I) 68
    Bologna (W) 88
    Bologna (W) 88
    Bologna (M) 65
    Bologna (M) 65
    Bologna (I) 64
    Bologna (I) 64
    Dublin (W) 56
    Dublin (W) 56
    Dublin (M) 89
    Dublin (M) 89
    Dublin (I) 39
    Dublin (I) 39
    Helsinki (W) 50
    Helsinki (W) 50
    Helsinki (M) 83
    Helsinki (M) 83
    Helsinki (I) 48
    Helsinki (I) 48
    Base: All respondents, N=753.
    As argued above, it is not possible to generalise directly from our sample to the
    population of each city as a whole. However, some indication of the comparative
    levels of car ownership can be achieved by taking each of the different types of areas
    (working class, middle class, inner city) and ranking the cities on them. Table 4.2 re-
    presents Table 4.1 in this form. The table suggests that Athens and Helsinki are the
    two extreme cases in the study. Within each area Athens is in the highest or second
    highest rank. Conversely, Helsinki is in the lowest or second lowest rank within each
    area. Bologna and Dublin appear more ambiguous with no clear overall rank order
    across the different areas. The contrast between Athens – by far the poorest city in the
    study – and the much more affluent Helsinki recalls the earlier finding from the travel
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    11
    to work data. Owning a car, like using the car to travel to work, is hardly simply a
    function of the city’s wealth.
    Table 4.3 Household car ownership: city rank by area
    Cities by rank order within each area
    Working class
    suburban Middle classsuburban Inner city
    Highest Bologna 88% Athens 90% Athens 68%
    Athens 75% Dublin 89% Bologna 64%
    Dublin 56% Helsinki 83% Helsinki 48%
    Lowest Helsinki 50% Bologna 65% Dublin 39%
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    12
    The normality of the car is most pronounced in the ‘conventional’ household which
    comprises the respondent and a spouse or partner and where the respondent is in the
    core active age of 25 to 64. Here virtually every household in every area has a car
    (Table 4.3), particularly in the middle class suburban areas. Furthermore, in these
    households, car ownership now frequently means not the family car, but several cars
    Car owning households are least common in, above all, the Dublin working class area
    (only 63%) and the inner city areas of Dublin (73%) and Helsinki (79%).
    Table 4.4: Car ownership ‘core age’ partner households
    AREA Car owning
    households (%)(N) Mean N of cars per household(car owning households only)
    Athens (W) 84 25 1.05
    Athens (W) 84 25 1.05
    Athens (M) 97 37 1.28
    Athens (M) 97 37 1.28
    Athens (I) 94 18 1.59
    Athens (I) 94 18 1.59
    Bologna (W) 100 43 1.42
    Bologna (W) 100 43 1.42
    Bologna (M) 97 37 1.36
    Bologna (M) 97 37 1.36
    Bologna (I) 97 31 1.63
    Bologna (I) 97 31 1.63
    Dublin (W) 63 27 1.12
    Dublin (W) 63 27 1.12
    Dublin (M) 100 20 1.90
    Dublin (M) 100 20 1.90
    Dublin (I) 73 15 1.18
    Dublin (I) 73 15 1.18
    Helsinki (W) 87 15 1.31
    Helsinki (W) 87 15 1.31
    Helsinki (M) 100 30 1.40
    Helsinki (M) 100 30 1.40
    Helsinki (I) 79 14 1.18
    Helsinki (I) 79 14 1.18
    Total 91 (312) (285)
    Total 91 (312) (285)
    Base: All core age partner households, N=312.
    Evidence from the preliminary interviews and the focus groups showed that
    deviations from this normality are either the result of relative poverty or of conscious
    choice. In the survey this issue was addressed by focusing on those who did not have
    car but who had to travel to work or college. This group was asked for their response
    to the statement 'I would buy a car if only I could afford one'. It would be tempting to
    argue that the only reason why people in the suburban areas do not have a car is that
    they cannot afford one, whereas non-owners in the inner city might choose whether or
    not to buy a car. However, this is not the case, although given the very small numbers
    the responses must be interpreted with more than usual caution. The data shows an
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    13
    interaction of city level and area level issues. Firstly, all the areas of Bologna and
    Helsinki had a significant proportion of non-car owners who 'strongly disagreed' with
    the statement, while in the suburban areas of Athens and Dublin there were no such
    respondents at all. In other words, citizens of Bologna and Helsinki, wherever they
    live, can conceptualise life without a car, while this is much more difficult for
    suburban inhabitants of Athens and Dublin. Secondly, there was some disagreement
    with the statement amongst non-car owners in every single area of the study,
    suggesting that even in those areas where mobility is most dependent on the private
    car, not everyone regards it as an absolute priority to own their own individual car.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    14
    Table 4.5 Poverty and non-car ownership
    Response to the statement 'I would buy a car if only I could afford one' (row
    percentages)
    strongly
    agree agree no view disagree stronglydisagree (N)
    Athens (W) 27 55 18 11
    Athens (M) 67 33 6
    Athens (I) 22 78 9
    Bologna (W) 14 7 66 7 7 29
    Bologna (M) 11 45 11 6 28 36
    Bologna (I) 35 19 8 15 23 26
    Dublin (W) 63 6 31 16
    Dublin (M) 50 33 17 12
    Dublin (I) 7 48 10 29 7 31
    Helsinki (W) 11 11 44 33 18
    Helsinki (M) 8 8 83 12
    Helsinki (I) 10 10 40 20 50 20
    Base: Respondents at work or college without a car
    Finally, there are some if limited differences here between women and men. If
    analysis is restricted to the core car owning households (see above), then within these
    households men usually, but not always, are more likely to drive than women. While
    certainly the normal case is that all adults can drive, in our case study cities at least
    some clear gender differences do remain.
    Chart 4.1 Car driving by gender, car owning households only
    010
    2030
    4050
    6070
    8090
    100
    Athe
    ns (W
    )
    Athn
    ens
    (M)
    Athe
    ns (I
    )
    Bolo
    gna
    (W)
    Bolo
    gna
    (M)
    Bolo
    gna
    (I)
    Dub
    lin (W
    )
    Dub
    lin (M
    )
    Dub
    lin (I
    )
    Hels
    inki
    (W)
    Hels
    inki
    (M)
    Hels
    inki
    (I)
    Men
    Women
    Base: respondents in car-owning households
    Finally, it is important to notice that age is a more important discriminator than
    gender. In every area with the exception of inner city Helsinki, there is a clear
    inverted U shaped relationship between age and car driving . With the exception of
    Bologna, it is car driving is most common amongst the middle class and the middle
    aged. Fully 90% of respondents aged between 25 and 64 in the middle class Dublin
    suburb drove, while at the other extreme the same applied to only 13% of respondents
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    15
    under 25 in the working class Dublin suburb. The same pattern applies in most other
    cities, but not with the extreme differences shown in Dublin. Car is also most
    common in the middle years of the life cycle. As might be expected, while in the older
    age category the proportion who own a car and the proportion who drive a car are
    usually similar, in the younger category drivers are more frequent than owners. If
    inequalities of access to the car are defined by age more than gender, then one
    strategy for reducing car usage may be to try to postpone as long as possible the point
    at which young adults decide it is necessary for them to purchase their own car.
    4.3 Public versus private transport
    In all European cities public policy now aims to persuade people to use public
    transport instead of the car. The city level analysis has already shown dramatic
    differences between our case study cities in terms of the extent to which people use
    the car to travel to work (Charts 3.1 and 3.2). Not surprisingly, these differences are
    reflected in the survey. Public transport usage is higher in Bologna and in particular in
    Helsinki than in the other two cities. Thus within the working class areas, fully 48%
    of respondents in Helsinki had used public transport in the last two days, higher than
    in any other working class area. Equally, in both inner city and middle class suburban
    areas, usage is higher in Helsinki than in the other cities. The differences between the
    areas within the cities are equally important and clear. With the exception of
    Bologna, usage of public transport is lowest in the middle class area. Within these
    general patterns, it is worth noticing the extraordinarily high level of public transport
    usage in the Helsinki inner city, with fully 58% of all respondents using public
    transport in the last two days - the highest level in the entire study. Helsinki is also
    remarkable for the mix of public transport - in Helsinki respondents are likely to use
    metro, tram and bus, and this is in fact particularly high in the inner city area which is
    served by all three modes.
    Not surpassingly, public transport usage usually falls as soon as there is a car in the
    household, although there are exceptions: the working class areas of Athens and
    Dublin, and in middle class Athens, presumably because not everyone in these
    households has access to the car when they need it. Even more important is the
    extent to which car ownership or car-driving replaces public transport usage
    completely. There is in fact substantial variation between areas and between cities in
    the extent to which car drivers (and car owners) also use public transport. At one
    extreme in inner city Helsinki 43% of all those in car-owning households used public
    transport in the last two days. At the other extreme there are areas, namely inner city
    Dublin and middle class Helsinki and middle class Dublin, where nobody with access
    to a car had used any public transport at all.
    Where public transport usage is combined with using the car, then public transport
    remains part of the ‘public sphere’, a facility that belongs to all citizens. By contrast,
    where public transport is abandoned as soon as people have access to the car, then
    there is presumably less public support for transport as a public service and public
    transport users may well be seen as an inferior group.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    16
    Table 4.5 Public transport use by household car ownership
    Percentage of each category using public transport in last two days
    AREA No car Has car All N
    Athens (W) 31 29 29 51
    Athens (W) 31 29 29 51
    Athens (M) 20 20 20 51
    Athens (M) 20 20 20 51
    Athens (I) 31 21 24 50
    Athens (I) 31 21 24 50
    Bologna (W) 83 30 36 99
    Bologna (W) 83 30 36 99
    Bologna (M) 62 34 44 98
    Bologna (M) 62 34 44 98
    Bologna (I) 63 27 40 98
    Bologna (I) 63 27 40 98
    Dublin (W) 42 37 39 54
    Dublin (W) 42 37 39 54
    Dublin (M) 50 15 19 54
    Dublin (M) 50 15 19 54
    Dublin (I) 27 0 20 54
    Dublin (I) 27 0 20 54
    Helsinki (W) 62 33 48 48
    Helsinki (W) 62 33 48 48
    Helsinki (M) 63 15 23 48
    Helsinki (M) 63 15 23 48
    Helsinki (I) 72 43 58 48
    Helsinki (I) 72 43 58 48
    Total 52 26 34 753
    Total 52 26 34 753
    It is usually assumed that people do not use public transport because they see it as low
    quality form of travelling - it is unreliable, crowded, dirty, etc. Respondents were
    presented with a series of statements about public transport in their city and asked the
    extent to which they agreed with them.
    The simplest issue of public transport quality is whether or not it is clean - in terms of
    cleanliness of public transport, the statement was 'Public transport is dirty'. Another
    crucial issue is accessibility - whether the public transport system is a system which
    people can use to reach different parts of the city ('Public transport makes any part of
    the city accessible to me'). If citizens are to use the public transport they need reliable
    and comprehensible information ('The timetables are clear and easy to understand').
    Unlike in previous sections, the key division here is between cities, rather than
    between different areas. This is entirely plausible, because public transport operates
    at the level of the city rather than the local area. On the one hand, Dubliners have a
    far more negative view of their public transport than the inhabitants of our other cities.
    On each of the three aspects of public transport quality every single area of the city
    returns scores below the average. Conversely, the citizens of Helsinki see their public
    transport in a very positive light: on every aspect all areas of Helsinki return scores
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    17
    on or above the average. The situation in Bologna and Athens is more ambiguous,
    with Bologna tending to score more positively.
    The results can be seen more clearly if the different aspects of public transport quality
    are combined into a scale (Chart 4.2). This is a simple additive scale combining 9
    aspects of transport quality. Of the original 11 items, two are omitted since they did
    not correlate strongly with the others: 'The cost of fares puts me off public using
    public transport' and 'The public transport routes are useless for me'. The scores on all
    other items were totalled and the result recalculated to produce a scale ranging from 0
    (low) to 100 (high).
    Chart 4.2 Perception of Public Transport Quality
    AREA
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    Using this composite measure again shows the importance of the city factor - the
    scores for all three areas of each city are closely related. Again also the distinctive
    situation of Helsinki is very clear - in all three areas of Helsinki public transport is
    perceived more positively than in any area of any other city. Dubliners’ negative
    experience of their public transport system is highlighted in Chart 4.3 This shows that
    in all other cities, those people who actually use public transport have a rather more
    positive perception of it than those who do not. By contrast in Dublin, people who
    use public transport discover that it is even worse than the non-users believe.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    18
    Chart 4.3 Perception of public transport quality by recent use
    AREA
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    Public transpt use
    None
    Used
    The most satisfied transport users are those in all areas of Helsinki, the inner city and
    working class areas of Bologna, and the middle class area of Athens. Overall the
    most important finding of this section is the way in which Helsinki shows both high
    levels of public transport usage and a positive perception of public transport quality.
    Even in Helsinki, when people own cars they are less likely to use public transport.
    However in Helsinki the high quality of public transport has two effects. Firstly, it
    seems to make car ownership less important for people. Since the inhabitants of
    Helsinki believe they have a high quality public transport system, they are less likely
    to make purchasing a car a priority. Secondly, even when they own a car if they live
    in the inner city area in particular they are less likely than the inhabitants of the other
    cities to actually use their car. Car ownership, in other words, is not so necessary as
    elsewhere in order to participate in the society.
    4.4 Getting to work
    The journey to work remains the main focus of public policy attempts to reduce car
    usage, whether by persuading people to change transport mode or, in the longer term,
    by locating work and housing closer together. This focus is in fact problematic
    because the journey to work is a decreasing proportion of the total amount of car
    journeys. Furthermore, working times and even work locations are also becoming
    more flexible, so that the journey to work itself is becoming less amenable to the
    rigid patterns of most public transport provision.
    Nonetheless the journey to work remains the simplest starting point for a discussion of
    the different ways in which people use cars. City level data from 1990 (Chart 3.1)
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    19
    showed a clear difference between on the one hand, Athens and Dublin, two very car
    dependent cities, and on the other hand, Bologna and Helsinki, where cars were used
    much less for this journey. This section uses the survey data to explore that issue
    within the different areas of the four cities.
    As expected, in every city inhabitants of middle class suburban areas are most likely
    to make this journey in their own car. In every city but Helsinki, inhabitants of the
    inner city are most likely to travel on foot or by bicycle. Making comparisons
    between the cities, instead of within them, Athens has the highest level of travel to
    work by car (it is either in first or second position within each area) and Helsinki the
    highest level of travel by public transport.
    Chart 4.4 Normal mode of travel to work, all employed aged 25-64
    0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
    Athens (W)
    Athens (M)
    Athens (I)
    Bologna (W)
    Bologna (M)
    Bologna (I)
    Dublin (W)
    Dublin (M)
    Dublin (I)
    Helsinki (W)
    Helsinki (M)
    Helsinki (I)
    Own car Public transport Walk /cycle Other
    Base: All at work aged 25-64 (N=354)
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    20
    Chart 4.5 Normal mode of travel to work, all employed aged 25-64, car owners
    0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
    Athens (W)
    Athens (M)
    Athens (I)
    Bologna (W)
    Bologna (M)
    Bologna (I)
    Dublin (W)
    Dublin (M)
    Dublin (I)
    Helsinki (W)
    Helsinki (M)
    Helsinki (I)
    Own car Public transport Walk /cycle Other
    Base: All aged 25-64 and at work who own cars, N=212
    Chart 4.4 narrows the focus to examine only those aged between 25 and 64 who are at
    work. In other words, it focuses on that journey and those people that have been the
    conventional focus of transport policy.6 In middle class Dublin this now reaches
    nearly 80% of all respondents, and most areas are at about the 50% mark. This
    narrower focus also highlights the specific situation of inner city Helsinki, Dublin and
    Athens, where the proportion using their car is now remarkably low compared to the
    rest of the sample. When the focus is narrowed still further to examine only the car
    owners in this group, the proportion who do use their car to get to work is well over
    50% in all areas, but reaches its most extreme level in Dublin (70% or more in all
    areas). Conversely, those who leave their car at home are more likely to do so in inner
    city Helsinki than elsewhere. Helsinki car owners are particularly likely to leave their
    car at home because they find public transport more comfortable.
    In conclusion, this analysis suggests two rather different policy objectives. Firstly,
    the objective can be to accept universal car ownership, but to reduce the extent to
    which the journey to work is made by car. This fits with the frequent disclaimers of
    traffic planners that they are not 'against car ownership', just against car usage. The
    survey results can be used to support this argument - they show that there are cases
    where car owners do travel to work without using their cars. In the most extreme case
    for example, only 22% of employed 'core age' car owners in inner city Helsinki travel
    to work by car. This would seem to be the result of the combination of central
    location (leading to short journeys to work) and very good quality local public
    transport. However, inner city Helsinki is very much the exception. The normal
    situation is that car owners use their cars. This suggests that a more realistic strategy

    6
    To carry this argument to its full conclusion, we should just examine men - i.e. focus
    on the male breadwinner's journey to work.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    21
    may well be to discourage car ownership in the first place. Both objectives can be
    tackled by the same means: high quality public transport and a land use policy that
    enables people to live within reach of their workplaces.
    The interaction of both means can be clearly seen in the most 'negative' case. In
    working class suburban Dublin 92% of all car owners use their car to get to work.
    This area of Dublin it will be recalled has the lowest level of car ownership in the
    study. Normally low car ownership is associated with low car usage - since the same
    factors that make it unnecessary for people to buy a car also allow those with a car not
    to use it. However, in working class suburban areas like Dublin's Jobstown low car
    ownership is largely because of lack of resources: those who can afford a car will use
    it. The ethnographic study and the focus groups strongly suggest that those who do
    have cars in this area can get access to employment which non-car owners literally
    cannot reach. This is one of the clearest examples of the way in which car
    dependency at the city level imposes particular pressures on those with the least
    resources.
    4.5 Getting around
    We have already stressed that travel to work comprises a decreasing proportion of
    total travel. Another important regular journey is the journey to school. In many
    cities this is known to have a significant impact on the level of traffic. In the UK
    children are far more likely to be driven to school than was the case even ten year's
    ago, and the major cause appears to be parents' concerns about safety. However,
    public policy in many cities is attempting to reduce this trend. In Dublin for example,
    there is currently (autumn 1999) a 'Safe Walk to School' campaign which focuses on
    making it safer for children to walk to school.
    The survey collected information on journey to school separately for children at
    kindergarten, primary and secondary schools. Analysis of the information for primary
    school shows that overall children are far more likely to travel to school by non-
    mechanised transport (walking, cycling) than their parents are likely to travel to work
    by such means. Overall it is in the middle class areas that children are most likely to
    be taken to school by car, but the important exception is Helsinki, where despite high
    car ownership in the middle class area in particular, children continue to walk or cycle
    to school. The use of public transport is highly suggestive also. Public transport is
    used for this journey either where parents have no other option, as in working class
    Dublin, or where public transport is of very high quality as in middle class Helsinki.
    Only in working class Dublin, where a significant number of respondents with
    children do not have a car, does excluding these car-less households substantially
    increases the proportion using cars for this journey.
    The study also asked how people travelled for a range of different activities: various
    forms of shopping (small amounts of food, food for several days, clothes, electronic
    goods, DIY items), sociability (visiting relatives and friends in their own houses,
    meeting people in cafe, bar or restaurant, going to the organised entertainment) and
    medical facilities (hospital for emergencies or major surgery, doctor for general care).
    Looking at the respondents as a whole, this shows perhaps a rather lower level of car
    usage than one might expect. In most areas at least a substantial minority of people
    did not use the car for most activities. In these cities, despite widespread car
    ownership, most activities are carried out without using the car. Extremely high
    levels of car usage occur in middle class Dublin for shopping, and in middle class
    Athens for sociability and medical care. For all three types of activities, people use
    the car least in inner city Helsinki.. Restricting the analysis only to those households
    with a car obviously makes it more likely that people use the car for these journeys,
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    22
    but it remains the case that substantial minorities still use other means of transport,
    including quite frequently walking.
    Chart 4.6 Mode of travel: Shopping for food for several days
    0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
    Athens (W)
    Athens (M)
    Athens (I)
    Bologna (W)
    Bologna (M)
    Bologna (I)
    Dublin (W)
    Dublin (M)
    Dublin (I)
    Helsinki (W)
    Helsinki (M)
    Helsinki (I)
    1 own car 2 public transport 3 walk / cycle 4 other
    Base: All respondents, N=727
    Shopping for 'small amounts of food' is usually done on foot (or bicycle) and middle
    class Dublin is the only area where this falls below 50%. Accordingly, in most areas
    only about 10% of respondents use their car for this activity, but in middle class
    Dublin the proportion rises to 44% and in Helsinki it is still 30%. Working class
    Bologna is the only other area where the proportion is over 20%. By contrast,
    shopping for 'food for several days' usually involves some form of transport. Chart
    4.6 shows that fully 73% of all respondents reported using their own car for this in
    middle class Dublin, whereas at the other extreme this was the case for only 28% of
    respondents in inner city Helsinki. Here the contrasts between the working class
    areas are interesting. In Dublin virtually nobody reported making this journey on
    foot, and the proportion was only 16% in Bologna. By contrast, in the working class
    areas of both Athens and Helsinki it was over 50%. This is a clear case of constraint
    rather than choice: in the working class areas of Bologna and Dublin there are no
    supermarkets in walking distance of housing, so if there is no car available, people use
    public transport, taxi or some form of car sharing. Once again, those in working class
    suburban housing areas in car dependent Dublin are penalised for not having a car in
    way that does not occur elsewhere.
    4.6 Walking around
    In many cases the alternative to using the car is not to use public transport but to walk.
    A long tradition in critical urban planning (Jacobs, 1962) which is now the orthodox
    view suggests that curbing traffic restores the streets to pedestrians and recreates
    public space. From this perspective, the extent to which people walk around the area
    in which they live is a crude indicator of social cohesion.
    The survey therefore asked a series of questions about the 'walking quality' of the
    area, covering aspects of traffic pollution to personal safety and safety of children.
    Only an item to do with sociability ('If I walk around this area I nearly always meet
    someone I know') did not correlate strongly with the others, which were aggregated to
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    23
    create a scale. The box plot (Chart 4.7) shows how walking quality is higher (in
    terms of both low pollution and high personal safety) in all Helsinki areas compared
    to the comparable areas in other cities. It is noticeable that despite the resurgence of
    inner city living, walking around these areas is not seen as particularly pleasant or safe
    by their inhabitants. Indeed, inner city Bologna, praised by planners because of its
    restrictions on car usage, actually scores the lowest of all areas in terms of walking
    quality.
    Chart 4.8 focuses on the personal safety element of ‘walking quality’. It shows that in
    these terms inner city Bologna is seen as one of the worst areas. There is in fact a
    growing amount of anecdotal evidence to suggest that pedestrianisation of inner city
    areas can attract 'street people' whom the inhabitants find threatening (shortly after the
    survey was carried out, there was a much publicised murder in the Piazza Maggiore in
    the heart of Bologna's centro storico). By contrast, the lack of safety in working class
    Athens and Dublin areas shows a destruction of public space by some inhabitants
    themselves - in particular young males make others unwilling to use the streets.
    Chart 4.7 Walking quality by area
    484848525451989899495151N =
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    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    24
    Chart 4.8 Personal safety ('I personally feel safe from attack') by area
    0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
    Athens (W)
    Athens (M)
    Athens (I)
    Bologna (W)
    Bologna (M)
    Bologna (I)
    Dublin (W)
    Dublin (M)
    Dublin (I)
    Helsinki (W)
    Helsinki (M)
    Helsinki (I)
    Strongly agree Agree No view Disagree Strongly disagree
    Base: All respondents
    5. Conclusion
    One curious feature of contemporary sociology is its willful ignorance of the material
    world. At a time when income inequalities are widening, analysis of social class often
    appears an almost esoteric pursuit. Equ+ally, confronted by problems of global
    sustainability and environmental degradation, many sociologists seem to imagine that
    their only contribution is a sceptical sociology of knowledge. At a more mundane
    level, a sociological understanding of the role of cars in society is usually reduced to
    a concern with the cultural role of the car as status or sexual symbol. By contrast, this
    paper has attempted to explore one particular way in which a technology with
    negative environmental consequences is linked to social structure. Car dependency is
    not just an environmental issue, it is also a social issue. However, a final word of
    caution. This conjunction of environmental and social problems is in many ways
    fortuitous. Other techologies – or even the same technology in a different context –
    may well have beneficial social effects and negative environmental effects. The paper
    has merely argued that at the moment in Europe that does not apply to the car.
    Transport Rich and Transport Poor
    25
    Bibliography
    Apel, Deiter and Pharaoh, Tim (1995). Transport Concepts in European Cities.
    Aldershot: Avebury.
    Jacobs, Jane (1962). The Death and Life of Great American Cities. London:
    Jonathan Cape.
    Rogers, Richard (1997). Cities for a small planet. London: Faber & Faber.
    Whitelegg, John (1993). Transport for a sustainable future: the case for Europe.
    London: Belhaven Press.
    Williams, Robin (1995). 'Information Technology in Organisations'. Edinburgh,
    Research Centre for Social Sciences (Report to DGIII of the European Commission).
    Winner, Langdon (1980). 'Do Artefacts Have Politics?' Daedalus (Winter), pp.121-
    136. [reprinted in D. MacKenzie and J. Wajcman, The Social Shaping of Technology,
    pp. 26-37.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  146. #146
    Devo
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    successful man?

    I think...that car-dependent land-use patterns promote
    anomie and create the malleable demographic. People
    living this way are compartmentalized inside their
    cars and are more likely to experience others through
    a TV screen than in person, and the closest thing to
    public space is a shopping mall. Without the
    back-and-forth of unmediated experience, this
    population has fewer opportunities to think critically
    and consider alternatives.
    Jym Dyer
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  147. #147
    Devo
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    Daniel Vasquez

    http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/mo...l/16738758.htm

    i cant believe this!
    does this mean this guy is going to walk away?
    at what point is this not disgusting?

    sad
    just freaking sad
    this is what humanity has to show for itself?
    wow

    no wonder i want to be a hobo
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  148. #148
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    Its tough to keep moving forward in this world...we see so much injustice, dishonesty, cruelty everyday. But move forward we must.

    The drifter life is appealing.

    Word.

  149. #149
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    Sand Surfer

    And to think some question the pleasure of riding free on beaches?

    Yessir, there are times where the vagabond's life can look mighty appealing. That, and Inspector Callahan's.
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  150. #150
    Obi
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    Idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    Yeah D, most of us that ride in the area, and are also members, heck, there's even a post over in the Nor-Cal board,
    have now heard about Dan's passing. He was a cool and unique guy, he'll be missed.

    I hope that justice finds it's path and things work out for the best.

    Meanwhile, we all must "keep marching" on our path, into a new day.
    Full Poem: http://www.purelydreaming.com/?do=viewlit&lit=4636

    Take Care Man!!

  151. #151
    Devo
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    this is kind of cool

    http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=HAtSQQaWJ- 0&eurl=http% 3A%2F%2Fpleasant revolutio
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  152. #152
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    this is kind of cool

    http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=HAtSQQaWJ- 0&eurl=http% 3A%2F%2Fpleasant revolutio
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  153. #153
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    Seaborn

    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  154. #154
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    Reality Check!

    Seaborn claims he didn't realize he'd hit anyone YET THE VICTIM'S BICYCLE WAS FOUND IN HIS POSSESSION ?!?!?!!!!!!!!!!!!????????

    Hello, Monterey County prosecutor...is anyone home?

    Nice work with the properly pious courtroom appearance. Surely he is a model good citizen and loves small animals.

  155. #155
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    what do you do when...

    with all the funk going around.
    that is, i've been sick with the flu and a funky cough...
    then this whole thing with Daniel Vasquez goes up...
    my god...
    sometimes i just trip out.
    how can this be LIFE?
    anyways...
    so i decided to vent/direct some funky weird nervous/ill energy
    the outcome was to go thru the Pug, clean it up, inspect the wear, rotate tyres, and basically just give it a bunch of omage. pay my tribute so to speak. treat it nice, and go thru a working mediation of sorts, if you will, and repeat a ritual of bicycle maitenance that i've done countless times over, since i was a kid.

    here is the result...
    O.D. green Pug properly cared for...
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  156. #156
    Devo
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    howitzer

    cool old pic
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  157. #157
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    ToC Stage 4

    D, did you and Pugs catch the start up in Seaside? They finished less than a mile from my home in SLO, after averaging 27 mph over 132.6 miles!

    For one day at least, bicycles ruled this town.
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  158. #158
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    very cool pic. looks like the Mission in the back ground.

    i havent been out and about for about a week now. i've been fighting off the flu/cold/respiratory junk..etc.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  159. #159
    Devo
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    how to patch a tube?

    so the Pug has had this annoying slow leak.
    first it took a couple of weeks, and i was thinking...lol...dude...it takes weeks for any noticable air to escape...forget it.
    then it became about a week...
    and then...i woke up and the tyre was flat
    dooohhh!
    i take the tube out...give it a once over...nothing
    and for 2 days it likes to go almost flat in about 8hrs...
    ok dude....you got to figure this out.
    one more time...pull it apart
    inspecting the valve stem...
    damn...
    its separating from the tube...
    its the kind of flat that typically cant be fixed.
    but its the Pug...uhhh...like dude...i just dont happen to have an extra Pug tube layin around. hmmm...well...if Eric over at Winning Wheels is smart, he'd have one in stock with my name on it. I cant wait...so i decided to ghetto rig it.
    the approach...
    Marine Goop and old road tube.
    we'll see if its holding air in the morning.
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  160. #160
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    Nice.

    Dude, you rule!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  161. #161
    Devo
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    if you aint ever used that stuff...
    it also is sold as "Household GOOP"
    and you can thin it with Toluene.
    the Goop is thick...squeeze some into a glass jar, add toluene, and stir with a metal stick. like an old spoke...and make sure you do all of this outside or in a well ventilated area. also you can add paint...like any Testor's model paint, and then you have this crazy adhesive/sealant.
    i mean...dude...you could put a cloth patch on your Zodiac inflatable boat and paint over it with clear Marine goop, and add layers as needed. it flexes all crazy, and will virtually never come off.
    ever have a nice old saddle start to unglue/unravel from underneath...like the way they like to do after a year or two, especially once they get a good solid winter exposed to the underside...well...GOOP is your hero on this one too. just re-glue the edges into place.

    uhh...
    so you can use Goop for other things too
    like...that is how i glued my Cars-R-Coffins patch to my messanger bag
    also a big ol strip of reflective Scotch Brite

    btw...
    i read once b4 that drunks are lured to red lights
    they often fixate on the tail lights ahead...
    so on a bike...a red light...one of those little red blinkie types...
    well...my fear is that they are like "Drunk Lures"
    they fixate on them...Target lock
    and next thing you know....ka-blam-o
    so i use a big-ol AA powered white vista light
    officially according to DOT white is for the front
    and red is the only legal rear tail light...
    but that big white flashing light is noticable
    and there is something to be said about any reflectors that move around
    like reflective tape on wheels, etc
    on the messanger bag, its the scotch brite swewed into the straps

    peace...d
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  162. #162
    Devo
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    the Townie life is driving me crazy. I can hardly believe that this is The Life. Just today im sitting in a staff meeting with these huge bayview windows peering thru the swaying pines, with the Monterey Bay crecent shape a void of sorts, at the distance its a blue flat spot.
    I can see the Monterey Beach Hotel, and i find it so weird that near to that spot is a monument dedicated to the Portola Expedition.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portola_expedition
    and to think that this area was home of some 10,000 native americans
    a group that we commonly refer to as The Ohlone.
    see The Ohlone Way
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohlone
    in about 300 years this is what we've come to
    gone are the days where life was natural
    and can you imagine all the piddly junk that goes thru our heads on a daily basis...
    its insane
    all these silly concerns, and what of it all?
    the Ohlone would simply move from the cost to the hills, following the seasonal foods.
    Abalone where plentiful on the rocks, and all you had to do was pry one loose.
    no cars
    no houses
    no jobs
    no electricity
    but then again, the average lifespan was about 40yrs.
    40yrs of pure nature
    these days we've enslaved our selves
    paying the mortage, car payments, healthcare costs, the list goes on
    we work our days away

    in the background a roundtable conversation so to speak, therapeutic dosing, rates of infusion, duration of therapy, etc....
    my mind fights the battle and to resist the nuances of the whole notion
    my point...i better get out there an live my life before its too late.
    and suddenly the grasp of Civilization will hold me fast
    all those protocols will soon to be upon my horizons, and all that will be left of a free life will be just a book, to read, as i'd pass my days in doors, watching the sway of pine boughs.
    not too much different than the way things are now.
    the only difference will be that i'd be the reciever of those medications.
    and glad to have them too, i assume.

    so for now, as the call of out of doors and the beckon of a life as free as i can manage pulls at my heart strings, eBay away my life is a moto that is growing stronger and stronger every day.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Colnago-Bititan-...QQcmdZViewItem
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  163. #163
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    *bump*

  164. #164
    Spooooon!
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    Devo are you OK? Haven't heard much from you lately. Your probably out on the ramble again.

  165. #165
    Devo
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    thanks for asking...

    things are fine
    just working a ton
    saving the $'s
    pretty much i feel like i've said all that i've got to say

    i'm still on the bike every day
    gettin in about 3hrs a day, and the bike parts seem to be wearing out more and more
    so i've been rotating tyres, canibalizing brake pads, and simply swapping bikes.
    I want to put a new drive train on the Pug, but waiting for the Surly cranks

    it seems that summer is fast upon us...
    i wonder what happened to the rain?
    or have i become that accustomed to what it was
    for the most part the ground is now hard pack
    the tracks i laid in the wet have set in clay
    the ravens are flocking these days
    it seems that spring chicks and eggs are the feast
    as those early morning murders swoop along

    the other day, im sitting on my steps, reading a book a buddy gave me
    "Monkey" folk novel of China by WU CH'ENG-EN translated by Arthur Waley
    when a squirl decides to visit
    we chat a bit
    and it comes to sit along my side, while i pet it for awhile
    curious as to what im reading
    so i read aloud
    the story or my voice seems to entertain it a bit
    shortly after...its upon a hand rail, when a raven swoops past
    Squirl stands upon 2 legs
    stares into the distance...
    and to my surprise...
    holds up a fist!
    perhaps 10seconds past as it stood in this posture

    and to think that most run mad in our daily lives
    engaged with a mind of utility function
    work, paybills, wash dishes, laundry, plan for retirement, etc
    we scramble to our cars
    while hawks screech above, coaxing their young from the nest
    a passer by says to me, "what are you staring at?"
    those hawks high above of course

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  166. #166

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    OK guys, how do you change the tires on the Large Marge's? My adult son and I could not seat the bead enough on a WTB monster tire to get the tire on. We broke multiple tools, including a specialty mounting tool, in addition to a drumstick. We both had bloody knuckles and he wacked himself in the face when one of the tools broke. I've replaced dozens of "regular" tires without a problem. I feel like half a man.

    Larry

  167. #167
    Devo
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    The thing is with LM rims is that they are shaped like a valley. so the thing to do is to PUSH the bead of the tyre off of the bead of the rim, and into the middle of the rim (the valley).
    do this on both sides.
    now that the tyre (bead) is in the "valley" there is more room.
    cuz...the outside diameter of the valley is much less than the outside diameter of the rim bead.

    anyways...
    with the tyre in the valley of the rim, it gives you plenty of room to now take the bead of the tyre off the rim.
    you can do all of this with NO TOOLS.
    once you learn it, you'll be amazed at how easy it is.
    crazy easy.

    i also use plenty if talc around the tyres. (baby powder)
    you know...just coat the inside of the tyre, i also get plenty of talc on the tube
    that way the tyre doesnt stick to the tube
    which makes everything even that much more easy
    almost....SLICK

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  168. #168
    Spooooon!
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    Glad to hear that you are still out there. Keep those big wheels rollin'.

  169. #169
    Devo
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    i had to laff the other day...
    here i am living in this old hay loft with all these bikes
    the Car Free life
    and yet there is this condition that allows us to carry junk with us all the time...
    so it goes with the bike
    the challenge is to figure out how to carry the junk
    the mind of a backpacker comes to the front
    asking, "why do i want to carry THAT?"
    do i really need it?

    and i laff
    cuz all this time, with trailers, panniers, Xtracycle, messenger bags...
    it comes to the messenger bag

    mostly the Xtracycle sits
    for the last month or so i had been on my Salsa Moto Rapido, only using my messenger bag.
    once i pulled the BOB for logistics
    but really...

    to simplify i guess is to live your life with a messenger bag and a bike
    lol
    i had thought to myself how crazy i am...
    an XTRACYCLE of all things...
    a trailer...too crazy
    and the craziest of it all, is that at certain times, i actually do need to use things like that.
    but overall...i guess i can get away with just the Kremlin on my back.
    its gold and huge.
    it can carry more than i care to put on my back.

    tonight i cleaned up the Pug, put the panniers and racks back on...
    the lure of those crazy Gucci saddle bags is beyond yuppie
    there is something so cool about not wearing anything on your back
    and to throw just about anything you care to lug around into the panniers
    then just click them off, walk into work...

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  170. #170
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    Brah, I can definitely sympathize. I look around the condo and think that I could do without a lot of the stuff I have. Bikes, gear, furniture, etc. Anything that isn't absolutely necessary seems excessive. But then I go and buy some new riding gear - goggles, moto boots, armor. What am I doing? A conversion van? I must have really lost my mind. No, I am following my passion.

    Keep on keepin on man. You are an inspiration to us all. I took my Xtracycle to the store today to get my groceries. We are liberated!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  171. #171
    Devo
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    you'd never guess what i did today...
    today was the good old days parade here in PG
    and there was a little group for "sustainable PG"
    they asked me to ride in the parade, being that im a no car guy
    ok...cool...

    so im at this parade and im watching all the kids, etc
    up in front of us a few, is a group of kids, all girls, that are doing some kind of chorographed line dance/drill and ceremony/cheerleading kind of thing.
    when i watch...
    those kids have no buisness making those kinds of moves.
    holy smokes!
    way too young to be movin like that

    obviously im turning into an old man, and seeing the impact mass media has on our society pretty much disgusts me.

    im at work tonight, and all the junk that humanity has, pours out
    its obvious that we just dont know what we are doing
    how to live
    how to treat each other
    how to treat our environment
    much less how to treat ourselves

    at the end of my day...
    im on the Pug and its late night
    the drizzle is coming down
    cars slowly roll past
    the flash of the Vega headlight strobing thru the drops
    Little Feat going thru my head
    lyrics pour from my childhood
    the mood seems just about right

    Lowell George
    I been warped by the rain, driven by the snow
    I'm drunk and dirty don't ya know, and I'm still, willin'
    Out on the road late at night, Seen my pretty Alice in every head light
    Alice, Dallas Alice

    I've been from Tuscon to Tucumcari
    Tehachapi to Tonapah
    Driven every kind of rig that's ever been made
    Driven the back roads so I wouldn't get weighed
    And if you give me: weed, whites, and wine
    and you show me a sign
    I'll be willin', to be movin'

    I've been kicked by the wind, robbed by the sleet
    Had my head stoved in, but I'm still on my feet and I'm still... willin'
    Now I smuggled some smokes and folks from Mexico
    baked by the sun, every time I go to Mexico, and I'm still

    And I been from Tuscon to Tucumcari
    Tehachapi to Tonapah
    Driven every kind of rig that's ever been made
    Driven the back roads so I wouldn't get weighed
    And if you give me: weed, whites, and wine
    and you show me a sign
    I'll be willin', to be movin
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  172. #172
    Devo
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    Check this out.
    Ok…so I work 10 days per pay period (14 day pay period)
    There are 26 pay periods per year
    10 x 26 = 260 days of work/year
    I haven’t had a car for the last 2.5yrs
    260 x 2.5 = 650 times I’ve ridden to work in the last 2.5yrs
    From my house to work it’s about 700ft of elevation gain
    700 x 650 = 455,000ft of elevation gain (almost ½ million feet)

    Wow…numbers trip me out.
    Everest is 29,000ft
    455,000/29,000 = 15.6 times
    455,000/5,280 (1mile) = 86 miles of elevation gain

    Just getting to work over the last 2.5yrs, the elevation gain is about equivalent to climbing Everest 15.6 times.
    Well…riding a bike up Holman Hwy 650 times is nothing like Everest, altho there are O2 canisters at work.

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  173. #173
    SlowJoe
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    Riding up Holman Hwy is no joke on that bike . I'm sure you don't need any coffee to help you wake up after that ride .

  174. #174
    Devo
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    sometimes i loose track of time...

    over the last day I've been going thru my mind over and over...
    has it really been 2.5yrs without a car?
    somehow, that figure "650" times up the hill just to get to work...
    the 455,000ft of gain...
    it just doesnt seem possible.
    not to mention all the regular rides, etc...
    i've been in my job for over 13yrs now
    I'd say that I've ridden my bike to work over 90% of the time
    its just mega miles
    massive hills, etc
    i remember when i was into doin 24hr solo races
    and the course(s) would have about 1600ft/lap of gain
    i'd get in about 12 laps or so = about 19,000 of climbing
    and god only knows what I've really climbed over the last 2.5yrs.

    so I'm rumaging thru my mind, thinking that none of this is factual.
    and im thinking...dude...all of it is just way too crazy. no way
    im going back thru this thread, and sure enough, I've been on the Pug since 10/05
    holy smokes
    time just flies by.

    I was eating Mexi food over at Taqueria Del Mar one night
    and i say to the lady that works there, "I remember when there was a counter on that wall."
    she looks at me and says..."next month (May) it will be 20yrs."
    i cant believe that i've been eating burritos at the same place for 20yrs!

    I remember when I first got the Pug
    in my mind, I'm sayin to myself things like...
    "Ok cool...its like when you were a kid 11 or 12 years old and you had a Schwinn 5sp cruiser."
    just the heft of the Pug, getting it up and down the stairs every day, reminds me of being that little kid wrestling a cruiser with generator light and rack
    as an adult with some athletic experiece and a daily "bike practice", the miles set in...
    i distinctly remember for about the first week or so, every time I'd take the Pug out, at the end of the day, I'd just pass out. SLEEP
    I was exhausted. and i'd just laff about it

    this past winter, i never even got cold
    the Pug is so big, that you never get cold. just go up hill...instant heater.

    yesterday (saturday) and last tuesday, I took the Pug out with some roadies with VCM, goin out thru Ft. Ord on Tues, and Sat was thru PB.
    group road ride on a Pug
    its fun
    its amazing that i can actually even ride it in a group
    its a monster
    yet at times its truely amazing
    its about all that mass
    the momentum it carries
    and the ability to corner so well
    those huge tyres just provide massive grip
    a twisty descent with bad pave, on the Pug, you eat this kind of stuff up
    the girls on road bikes love to sit behind and use the draft
    they say its good, mega draft
    sometimes someone will call out, "car back" as the Pug tyres have caught their attention...
    only to laff as i'm rotating thru in the pace line

    its truely an amazing machine
    its in bad need of a new drivetrain
    I've been waiting for the new Surly Mr. Whirly cranks, cuz i'd like to get rid of that mega DH BB and use the outboard bearing set up, but im not sure if i'll wait
    maybe i will go ahead and get stuff. it looks like the Surly cranks are sans chainrings anyway...so i guess if i buy a new drivetrain, the chainrings will swap over.

    this winter im 39
    as the days go past up at work, the topic of personal health, and quality of life often comes up.
    its the big question that we all carry around.
    that is...
    "what is this life im living?"
    lately i've been getting all these complements about my health, simple life, and seemingly voluntary effort in my circumstance(s).
    in that light, i'm so greatful to have found that the bottom bracket is in fact the center of my universe.
    just yesterday someone was telling me of their prior life in Illinois where they drove an hour every day to get to work. they had to pay for parking, the gas, the new car, the insurance, and of course the life that ensued, which was work, driving, and eating from fast food. life was from box to box, and the pay was check to check. week after week, year after year, etc
    when i see that car leasing is on the rise, it concerns me.
    my suspicion is that the tactic is to lure with cheaper monthly payments or something along those lines. maybe a nicer car for x amount of $
    my co-workers say that in the news it said to expect gas over $4gal by the end of summer.
    as i think about the $ people devote every month to their cars, and the life secondary to the bondage of cars...
    at $4/gal, and the rise of car payments, etc...i honestly wonder to what degree will our nation be imprissioned, sitting at home, not affording transport, a life, and yet paying with sweat and $.
    for me its a sad vision
    the vision that we as a culture, our collective efforts, have lead us to this condition.
    everyday i honestly believe that im living my ideal life
    that being that i can ride my bike to work
    and i can even choose to ride a bunch of dirt on the way there.
    a place to live, wage, and lifestyle that allows me to actually save money
    its a simple life that is calm and tranquil, only life at work is the chaos...that is the nature of that job, and perhaps that is the nature of humanity.

    i look around and see a lot of really nice bikes out there these days
    lots of new faces in our community
    VCM (the local club) is getting pretty big
    to the extent that there are actually now, 3 groups, 7a, 730a, and 8a for the Saturday Morning Ride.
    cycling is pretty large these days.
    i have to confess that i'd sit in the back of my mind, and kind of elvaluate these people. i'd look at them, listen to their speech, the way they ride, and i ask myself if this is a person that would possibly incorporate the bike into their daily lives.
    a couple of Tuesdays ago, one of the girls pulls up on her Calfe road bike with a rack on the back, and i say to her, "thats great! as my dad would say...you've now taken that bike and made it useful." lol

    so i leave you with a couple of pics
    a parking lot off of Lighthouse Ave in PG during Good Old Days, filled with bikes

    peace...d
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  175. #175
    Devo
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    blinkies, lights, tyres...

    i finally broke down and bought a new Light and Motion ARC Li-ion
    and wow, its so crazy bright
    there is something about that crazy purple(ish) light
    i see things at night that i've never seen during the day

    back in the day Light and Motion use to give me stuff when i was doin some 24hr Solo racing, and its only been in the last year or so that my Cabeza finally took up the ghost. of all things the cable frayed open at the back of the light. Oh well...new light now

    i've been using a Vega for the last 2.5yrs and its great. I've never had one issue with it.
    even when i was knocked down by that passing mini van, the Vega slid across the pave a bit, leaving it with a few scratches, but its always worked.

    I read that they have a new LED setup, Stella, that is due to come to market this fall. I hope that i can simply plug it into the new Li-ion battery that comes with the ARC.

    on the topic of commuting and lights, i'd like to re-emphasize the importance of being seen. so i like to use a VistaLite WHITE blinkie. I had once read somewhere that drivers in general tend to fixate on the tail lights ahead. So by using a WHITE blinkie for the rear it grabs drivers attention, instead of acting like some kind of tractor beam.

    here are a couple of pics of the Pug from today. the tyres are wearing quite well. I've only had to replace 1 tyre since 10/05. they've seen lots of miles, and a wide range of use.
    I've also just now replaced the EBC Gold brake pads.
    a new drive train should be soon.
    i need to not be such a tight wad on this kind of stuff.
    but the new ARC, disc brakes for the Salsa, and a few other small items has set me back almost a cool $1K

    peace...d
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  176. #176
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    I like your thinking, but you would get a ticket riding with a rear-facing white light in New Zealand. They might tolerate it if you put a "blue" or "green" gel under the lens.

  177. #177
    Devo
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    technically speaking
    as far as i know
    according to DOT (department of transportation), here in the US a white tail light is not legal.
    VistaLite sells it as a front light.
    and as i remember, some time back, some bicycle group tried to get DOT to change the laws.
    but for now, i get away with it, along with a handful of other things


    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  178. #178
    Devo
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    night ride, not what i had imagined...

    so tonight i decide im gonna hit the beach after dark, and check out the scene/get a ride in.
    as it turns out...
    its 53F, windy, and the tide is on the rise
    i ride anyway...
    being that is what i do anyways...ride
    it gets dark somewhere around 830p
    that is...its dark enough then to use a light
    the beach is pretty much empty...
    what did i expect?
    people, warm weather, music, food?
    wait....uhhh...dude?
    i think that is Mexico that is in your mind...
    right...
    Monterey is nothing but cold
    the people that are on the beach...
    well...it seems pretty weird
    likely illicit activity
    so i get a kick off of using my new HID light
    like they dont see me coming a mile away anyways...
    so im surprised when they act surprised

    with the weather being what it is...
    and being the middle of the week...
    as i chit chat with some local bikies i happen to know...
    i realize that there is this social person in me that is wanting to get out
    but where are the Buddhist girls on bikes?
    where is the simple life?
    (sigh)
    same old America
    I came across a girl in a tank top dropping coins into the parking meter...
    she gave me no notice, until she spotted the tyres on the Pug
    the classic line goes like this...
    Girl: "wow...those are the biggest tires i've ever seen on a bike."
    Devo: "ya...its a lot of rubber."

    its the typical banter...i dont know what to make of it, other than simple chit chat

    earlier i rode my Salsa with BOB trailer, as i had to make it up to work for a meeting
    new Avid BB7's hadnt yet been broken in
    so it was an easy, premeditated venture
    with BOB in tow, it was to the grocery store after the meeting.
    loading up...i have no real idea of what i hauled. less than 100lbs, more than 50

    the ride before work was a good solid 1.5hrs at a decent effort, hills, and just in the nick of time to clock in.
    then i just realized that tonights little ramble around town was a good 2.5hrs

    so there you go...
    4hr bike day
    Devo style...
    no goal...
    just go out and have fun.

    new found vice of the day?
    uhh...
    Virgil's Rootbeer from Trader Joe's

    peace....d
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  179. #179
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    Is that really morphine?

  180. #180
    Devo
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    ya...for reals empty jar. it used to have 25gms. the other jar is Marinol 5mg. also empty.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  181. #181
    Devo
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    thank my lucky stars...

    today i say, "thank my lucky stars"

    as the money piles up
    as the simple life settles in
    as the tranquility soothes my bones
    the miles roll by
    and im happy to call this place home

    daily life on the bike
    is just like its always been
    like when i was a kid and i learned i could just ride across town
    or ride to the beach
    and hang out with new people
    or just to be in a new scene
    i often stop to realize just how far i've become removed from the norm
    Devo and his bike
    on his typical solo ramble around who knows...

    i do know this tho
    im greatful for the ability to do as such
    and im greatful for the environment i was fortunate enough to stumble upon
    im greatful for the set of circumstances that i live
    im greatful to have small town streets that are hardly busy
    im greatful to ride to work during off peak commute times

    as the years fade away
    as the miles pile up
    it seems that recently more focus on Bike Life is coming into view
    new Staff Locker Room is soon to open, complete with showers
    along with yet another set of bike lockers to boot

    Im greatful for the job i have, a karmic chance to increase one's field of merritt
    the immediate environ out of those doors, just as it is from my doorstep
    the locale is prime for cycling
    even in the rainy days, its really not that bad...actually i like it

    today was yet another staff meeting
    and luckily for me i was allowed to clock out, and head home
    as compared to sticking around for yet more OT and work
    i rolled my happy butt along side of everyone else in their cars...
    stopped at the lights...
    rode back into PG
    bunny hop curbs
    do wheelies for kids
    they say "whoa!"
    chit chat at the bike shop (Winning Wheels)
    Im amazed to think back thru the years
    grab a soda at PG Liquiors
    and roll home...

    nothing exciting today...
    laundry, dinner, rest, and get ready for another 10day stretch of work
    those days too will melt past
    just as the rest have
    mile after mile
    hill after hill
    the tyres grind into the ground
    the drivetrain wears away
    my shorts pill, rip, and fade
    the salt builds up in my shoes
    the trash piles up
    wash clothes, eat food, ride bike, work, sleep and all that is in between

    this townie life is as if some kind of apparatus
    an obsticle
    a piece of equipment
    a condition for sure
    a place to find that peace of mind
    these days...im pretty well contented

    so i leave you with a few pics of my commute to work today...
    what do i have to complain about?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  182. #182
    Devo
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    more of the same...

    more of the same...
    commute to work scenery
    Attached Images Attached Images
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  183. #183
    mtbr member
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    I've never seen bike lockers like that before. Those are really cool!
    That is the best commute I have ever seen. Makes me long to ride in the woods again.
    Thanks for the pictures!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  184. #184
    Devo
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    ya...
    those are cool lockers
    BUT...
    as it is...
    uhhh....my seat actually presses against the door when i close it.
    i guess thats cool...it like the perfect fit
    im 5'10"....i can imagine that a person, say 6', on a MTB, maybe the door wouldnt close.
    anyways.,,kind of cool bike lockers
    they have taken a bit of a beating, getting hit by cars and all...figures huh?

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  185. #185
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    Better the locker than the bike getting hit, right?
    QR seatpost, problem solved, although I guess that would get a bit annoying.
    I ride DH bikes, so my sleat is slammed anyways.
    I definitely can't complain, my office lets me bring my bike in and store it in an empty cubicle. Putting it in the elevator to get it to the 3rd floor is difficult sometimes though. I've tried carrying it up the stairs, but people don't pay attention when they are coming down, so they almost walk right into me.
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  186. #186
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    Sigh... D, to find and attract a buddhist on a bike, you might want to think about becoming a buddhist. Don't leave you morphine bottles laying around.

  187. #187
    Devo
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    lol
    you funny girl
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  188. #188
    Devo
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    Devo life wouldnt be devo if there wasnt a bit of Civil Disobedience in daily life.

    so it goes like this.
    the Monterey Bay has become a Marine Sanctuary some time back, so of course now there is some fed money out there for various things.

    God knows i love TAMC (Transportation Agency of Monterey County), as they are our friends with Big Brother.

    last evening TAMC reveald a bike path plan.
    here is the article out of the Monterey Herald

    Trail plan displayed
    Path goes from P.G. to Pajaro
    By KEVIN HOWE
    Herald Staff Writer
    Monterey County Herald
    Article Last Updated:05/04/ 2007 08:40:29 AM PDT

    Details of a three-phase, 20-year, $27 million walking and biking
    trail system from Pacific Grove to Pajaro were displayed Thursday by
    the Transportation Agency for Monterey County at Castroville Public
    Library.
    The Monterey Bay Sanctuary Scenic Trail is planned as a continuous
    coastal trail system between Pacific Grove and the Santa Cruz County
    line.

    The master plan includes bicycle and pedestrian trail routes that are
    already in place and development of new trail segments.

    It is intended to provide access to, and promote appreciation of, the
    Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and to serve as a regional
    transportation alternative to the automobile.

    The project is divided into 17 segments. Maps showing existing trail
    routes, future routes and alternatives prepared for TAMC by
    consulting firm Alta Planning and Design, along with summaries of
    project details, were arranged in the library meeting room. Alta and
    TAMC staff members were on hand to answer questions. Written comments
    from visitors were collected.

    The draft plan calls for an initial $5.2 million project over the
    next five years to improve the existing trail segments in Monterey
    and Seaside; connection of a gap in the trail from Tioga Avenue to
    north of La Playa Avenue in Sand City; completion of trails at Fort
    Ord State Park to Marina State Beach; and completion of trail
    projects in Moss Landing, including a bridge across Elkhorn Slough.

    The second phase, estimated to cost $14 million, calls for completing
    a paved scenic trail from north of Marina and across the Salinas
    River, connecting to the Moss Landing segment of the trail to the
    McGowan-Thurwatchte r Road bridge over the Pajaro River.

    Several alternatives for crossing the Salinas River include using the
    existing railroad bridge, the existing two-lane highway bridge, or
    building a separate bridge for the trail, said Alta planner Loren
    Buckland.

    Use of the railroad bridge, she said, would not preclude eventual
    restoration of rail service on the old Del Monte Express tracks.

    The final trail project phase would involve completion of an unpaved
    trail between Marina State Beach and Moss Landing, with the cost
    estimated at $7.9 million.

    While the plan calls for avoiding, where possible, acquisition of
    private land for the trail, the $27.1 million estimated cost includes
    $9 million for land acquisition, according to the draft plan, which
    notes that this cost could vary with changes in land values.

    The transportation agency is expected to consider approval of the
    scenic trail plan at its Aug. 26 meeting, said Debbie Hale of TAMC.
    An environmental analysis in compliance with state and federal
    environmental laws, and permits from the Army Corps of Engineers,
    U.S. Coast Guard, state Department of Transportation and the state
    Coastal Commission, among others, would have to be secured.

    Kevin Howe can be reached at 646-4416 or [email protected] d.com.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    this is my 2cents on the topic/tangent

    so this is what i wrote for VCM/TAMC today.


    I dig the effort of TAMC and the proposal for the new bike path.
    i guess what we can look foward to in the close future is the change in the bike path behind Costco, and the use of the old Beach Range Rd. on Ft. Ord.
    that is super cool. we all know how awkward it is on Tioga Ave. maybe the bike path will simply not cross the bridge over HWY1, instead simply stay on the ocean side of the freeway.
    Ft. Ord Beach Range road couldnt be opened up soon enough.

    I'm thinking that the $27million over 20yrs has something to do with the Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary. that being, money is allocated on a federal level. Cycling as a recreation has an environmental/tourist/financial potential for growth.
    with REI moving into Ft. Ord, what more validation is there?

    my concern is of the immediate locale
    that is...
    bikes are good in daily life commuting to work, around 10 miles or so.
    i cant remember the last time i rode to SC.
    but i do know when i last went to Trader Joes, etc
    where is the bike path on Forest Ave, Freemont Blvd, Casa Verde, etc..
    obviously Forest Ave is too narrow at some places
    my point is that it seems to me that in our collective American Mind we objectify the bike. we wedge it into the corner with all of the other sporting goods. i love that bikes are so popular, but so many are uptop a car on the way to Tahoe, etc.

    when i see money (aka energy) being devoted to projects like the Monterey Bay Scenic Bike Path (dare i put a name on it?) it worries me because the bicycle is so much more than a piece of Recreational Sporting Good. A person shouldnt have to be an athlete and have an expensive bike to enjoy "The Bike Life". Bikes are mostly good for about 10 miles radius of a person's residence.
    while gas is on the rise, and the economy being as it is, wouldnt it be nice to see our immediate surroundings becoming more bicycle friendly for the "average person". How i'd love to see kids riding their bikes to school, to the beach, etc. Mom and Dads too...
    leave the car in the driveway...
    ride your bike around town...

    peace...d

    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the human race." H.G. Wells
    http://web.mac.com/asanacycles/iWeb/...s/Welcome.html
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  189. #189
    Devo
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    lately I've been on a bit of a social spree
    I've been going out on group road rides with the Pug
    and doin a bunch of chit chat with my fellow bikies here in town
    im always amazed with road bikes
    so i decided to take mine out yesterday, and head up to work
    wow...
    what a crazy thing a road bike is
    i put it back on the rack
    it almost frightens me
    a buddy has broken all kinds of road bike parts
    face plate for the stem
    frame broke at the BB
    twisted a pedal spindle in the crank arm
    broke off a handle bar
    BB bearings start grinding away
    straight up just pulled out a set of spokes from a DT Swiss wheel set
    chains snap
    etc
    its all catostrophic failure
    and he's lucky to have not been hurt

    with the Pug, the bike is solid enough that i dont worry about these things too much
    a solid dependable bike is what i appreciate these days

    at 160lbs i dont condisder myself a big guy
    even my old Cdale F900 the rear stays would flex in some turns on the road, to the point where i'd hear and feel the rear deraileur cable rub against the WTB Mutano Raptors.
    same holds true with my Salsa Moto Rapido, but not as much

    so todays theme is Reliability, and Safety.

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  190. #190
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    I just read this article in the Christian Science Monitor about the reduction in automobile proliferation in selected cities - made me think about you . . . it's mainly about recreation, but it's a start. Carless

  191. #191
    Devo
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    i love it!

    today's song of choice that streams thru my brain

    Modest Mouse, Interestate 8

    Spent 18 hours waiting stoned for space
    I spent the same 18 hours in the same damn place
    I'm on a road shaped like a figure 8
    I'm going nowhere, but I'm guaranteed to be late
    You go out like a riptide
    You know that ball has no sides
    You're an angel with an amber halo
    Black hair and the devil's pitchfork
    Wind-up anger with the endless view of
    The ground's colorful patchwork
    How have you been? [x2]
    How have you? [x2]
    I drove around for hours, I drove around for days
    I drove around for months and years and never went no place
    We're on a pass, we're on pass
    I stopped for gas, but where could place be
    To pay for gas to drive around
    Around the Interstate 8
    You go out like a riptide
    You know that ball has no sides
    You're an angel with an amber halo
    Black hair and the devil's pitchfork
    Wind-up anger with the endless view of
    The ground's colorful patchwork
    How have you been? [x2]
    How have you? [x2]
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  192. #192
    Devo
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    the house at work has been going thru major construction over the years...
    so there is this model of the facility under a plexi-glass dome placed for the public to view, right there at the Fountain Court.
    a young dad is holding his little girl up, maybe 3yrs old, and she is pointing out and saying the names of the things she can identify...
    tree
    car
    road
    grass
    and she says, "i like the grass, not cars"
    as im passing by, the dad had picked up that i had noticed them, and i say, "she is so smart"
    i smiled and kept on my way...
    some days, there are these moments of hope
    it seems that intuitively we as humans know something about life and how we interact with the world.
    its a secondary learning that brings us to value a car more than the grass...

    on another topic
    but along the same tangent...
    i read in the Californian (Salinas based news paper) that a Condor was found dead at Pinnacles National Monument. http://www.californianonline.com/app...EWS01/70514008
    so im on this Condor kick so to speak
    and im all into YouTube to find the vids
    of course there are a ton
    http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...&v=mp35i8Eylmo
    but i especially dig this vid
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iR49mqmPo9A&NR=1

    this vid
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_N6b364bE60
    at first i kept thinking that people were mistaking the common Turkey Vulture for a Condor, but as much as i tell, it does infact seem to be a Condor. WOW!

    at times where we've spent $600 billion in Iraq
    at times where it seems to me that we have lost touch with reality...
    what did Thoreau say?
    something like...
    "what remains after all this activity? (refering to man's industry)
    "Nature. Nature is what remains."
    im sure I've hacked the quote, but you get my gist

    and this guy is super cool
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mp35i8Eylmo
    obviously he's reading a script
    but to stop and put the time and energy into reading something out...
    that is rare!

    as this is May, Clean Air Month
    and here in Monterey County this week is Bike to Work Week...
    ironically these 4 days im off of work
    lol
    perhaps i'll sit on the bike path and mooch muffins in the am...
    make face with TAMC, etc...

    it seems that i've been more tired than i had thought...
    the day i let melt past, as i dozed away...
    something about riding the Pug with VCM (Velo Club Monterey) thru Pebble Beach on the Saturday Morning Ride (SMR), and my increasing time/efforts has put me on edge with that familiar threshold of exhaustion.

    the front page of the Californian has a pic of the crit from the weekend...
    sport...
    its ok i guess
    but you know, i have some serious ethical concerns
    when we look at professional cycling...
    all the dopping, i.e. Basso, Hamilton, etc...
    and sport in general...
    this mentality is more than likely the most formidable obsticle within the realm of cycling, that is...to bring cycling and nature to the forefront of our lives.
    when we engage in this competive spirit, consumerism, racing, the "A" type personality is quick to rise. the Ego.
    not that sport is bad
    bcz thru sport we learn cohesiveness, discipline, and our personal limits, to name a few.

    Saturday as i was heading up to work, again...up the hill, as i had already done so on the Pug at roadie pace, this time, the day had yeild a sunny moment...
    high above a hawk shrieks, its cries, i delight
    a pinpoint in the sky
    circling, wings and tail spread wide, its silhoutte easy to make out...
    it folds its wings back..
    this is my favorite part
    a screaming dive!
    into the forest thru the tree tops
    a high speed fly by
    a nest at the bottom of its parabolic flight
    a show off!
    im so envious!
    shear speed and grace
    and of little effort
    to be at one with reality

    the trick is to keep notice of those hawk nests
    and when you hear them high above, make your way quickly to view the show
    as this particular moment flashed by
    it streaked across a small clearing, a gap in the tree tops, maybe 20ft wide
    and im sure more than 100mph

    i track stand below
    in awe
    on the way to work...
    similar to the condor chick still in its shell...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iR49mqmPo9A
    i too...
    living a Townie life
    bound to economy, industry, etc
    moments of nature tug my heart strings...
    those feelings must be similar to the grunts of a hatchling
    waiting to take flight...
    en la Ventana
    along the cliffs of Big Sur
    in the Big South
    on the edge of western civiliztion
    where Big Blue sparkles like diamonds in the sun...

    peace...d
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  193. #193
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    Reminds me of something...


    (from The Dark Crystal)

    I'd love to see one flying, but man, that thing is ugly up close...

  194. #194
    Devo
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    The Dark Crystal, and Time Bandits
    classic
    ------------------------------------------------

    check out the Big Sur Chamber of Commerce website.
    http://www.bigsurcalifornia.org/condors.html

    attention the PBS vid.
    http://www.kqed.org/quest/television/view/93
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  195. #195
    Devo
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    not much new here this week

    here's some Devo Irony...
    its Bike to Work Week
    and im off from work.
    lol
    Friday i return to duty
    pretty laffs if you ask me
    but what else would it be
    me in my devo ways...

    so last evening there was this Ride of Silence
    a ride in memory of those who have fallen
    its a drag
    Brad Hanson
    Daniel Vasquez
    both i didnt know
    attending Brad's memorial i was amazed to the extent that has to be gone thru in order to get something as simple as a guard rail put into place.
    Brad from what i've come to know was on his bike a lot, and a bit of an outsider, so to speak.
    you know...
    in our little subculture of a world that is cycling
    its easy for an outsider to say, "oh, they are a cyclist", but we all know the mad array of pigeon holes we get wedged into.
    From what i know...
    it seems to me
    that Brad and Daniel were those of the flock outside the norm

    i can identify

    The Ride of Silence was an officially sanctioned event
    part of Bike to Work Week
    and part of May, Clean Air Month

    as i had no expectations
    other than i'd probably find peeps i know
    and to hear what the speech was going to be
    the group of cyclists was a wide cross section
    a couple of roadies, in full roadie garb
    parents and kids
    commuters
    and those who identify with the cycling lifestyle

    on the way home i was chit chatting with a buddy
    whom i havent had much of a chance to hang out with for some time
    a few brief moments to blab away, in free-format form, about life, and bikes of course
    ernie breaks off, i continue my way to PG

    i spot a group on cruisers, Rat Fink style, etc
    i know a couple of them, so i FLY into the back of the group
    Pug tyres with full brake, howling, grinding into the pave

    one of the guys i've known for quite some time, as he's a wrench at one of the LBS's
    another i've known thru ink
    the others im just inviting myself along the way
    lindsy catches my eye
    my brain now multi tasking...
    as Devo blasts thru my mind
    like an old record with needle cratch at the begining...
    The Girl you want...

    its just a cruise down to Lover's Point
    hang out at the little pier(?) for some time
    the sun long gone
    stories of the stupidiest things we've done on bikes
    stories of things we remember about each other
    and lately its been the ebb and flow of stories of
    Devo and the Pug
    i cant believe all the things people say...

    ie; "dude i remember one day, it was all rainy, and you were like 40mph in traffic, you signaled left, slid the rear tyre and dissappeared."
    life is funny

    obviously the Pug is like advertisement
    everyone says..."wow, what big tyres"

    the monterey peninsula
    somes i've come to say "The Monetary Peninsula"
    is mostly a bunch of A types
    a mass of aspiring athletes
    those so serious about...well...we all know...serious about life
    its a bit rare to come across the easy people
    those who seem to be casual, at easy, and relaxed with the way of things
    those who go with the flow

    i had to laff when ernie would tell me of the Salinas Crit, Cat 5's out there with carbon wheels. cat 5's on $4k bikes. that says its all.

    basically what im saying is that yesterday, in fact this week
    has been a social outing for me
    as if an elipical orbit of sorts
    as my dad use to say to me...
    "catch ya next orbit"
    at times, i'm so far removed from society
    so far removed from social occasion
    i get word that people look for my name in the obits

    well...
    today is the day the Pug gets a new drive train
    i finally ordered new chainrings, cogset, and chain.
    1yr 7months
    1 tyre
    1 set of brake pads
    new drive train.

    peace..d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  196. #196
    Devo
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    not much new here this week

    here's some Devo Irony...
    its Bike to Work Week
    and im off from work.
    lol
    Friday i return to duty
    pretty laffs if you ask me
    but what else would it be
    me in my devo ways...

    so last evening there was this Ride of Silence
    a ride in memory of those who have fallen
    its a drag
    Brad Hanson
    Daniel Vasquez
    both i didnt know
    attending Brad's memorial i was amazed to the extent that has to be gone thru in order to get something as simple as a guard rail put into place.
    Brad from what i've come to know was on his bike a lot, and a bit of an outsider, so to speak.
    you know...
    in our little subculture of a world that is cycling
    its easy for an outsider to say, "oh, they are a cyclist", but we all know the mad array of pigeon holes we get wedged into.
    From what i know...
    it seems to me
    that Brad and Daniel were those of the flock outside the norm

    i can identify

    The Ride of Silence was an officially sanctioned event
    part of Bike to Work Week
    and part of May, Clean Air Month

    as i had no expectations
    other than i'd probably find peeps i know
    and to hear what the speech was going to be
    the group of cyclists was a wide cross section
    a couple of roadies, in full roadie garb
    parents and kids
    commuters
    and those who identify with the cycling lifestyle

    on the way home i was chit chatting with a buddy
    whom i havent had much of a chance to hang out with for some time
    a few brief moments to blab away, in free-format form, about life, and bikes of course
    ernie breaks off, i continue my way to PG

    i spot a group on cruisers, Rat Fink style, etc
    i know a couple of them, so i FLY into the back of the group
    Pug tyres with full brake, howling, grinding into the pave

    one of the guys i've known for quite some time, as he's a wrench at one of the LBS's
    another i've known thru ink
    the others im just inviting myself along the way
    lindsy catches my eye
    my brain now multi tasking...
    as Devo blasts thru my mind
    like an old record with needle cratch at the begining...
    The Girl you want...

    its just a cruise down to Lover's Point
    hang out at the little pier(?) for some time
    the sun long gone
    stories of the stupidiest things we've done on bikes
    stories of things we remember about each other
    and lately its been the ebb and flow of stories of
    Devo and the Pug
    i cant believe all the things people say...

    ie; "dude i remember one day, it was all rainy, and you were like 40mph in traffic, you signaled left, slid the rear tyre and dissappeared."
    life is funny

    obviously the Pug is like advertisement
    everyone says..."wow, what big tyres"

    the monterey peninsula
    somes i've come to say "The Monetary Peninsula"
    is mostly a bunch of A types
    a mass of aspiring athletes
    those so serious about...well...we all know...serious about life
    its a bit rare to come across the easy people
    those who seem to be casual, at easy, and relaxed with the way of things
    those who go with the flow

    i had to laff when ernie would tell me of the Salinas Crit, Cat 5's out there with carbon wheels. cat 5's on $4k bikes. that says its all.

    basically what im saying is that yesterday, in fact this week
    has been a social outing for me
    as if an elipical orbit of sorts
    as my dad use to say to me...
    "catch ya next orbit"
    at times, i'm so far removed from society
    so far removed from social occasion
    i get word that people look for my name in the obits

    well...
    today is the day the Pug gets a new drive train
    i finally ordered new chainrings, cogset, and chain.
    1yr 7months
    1 tyre
    1 set of brake pads
    new drive train.
    and a lot of miles


    peace..d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  197. #197
    Devo
    Reputation: SelfPropelledDevo's Avatar
    Join Date
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    Condors...
    you got to check out this article in the Monterey Herald
    http://www.montereyherald.com/local/ci_5915850

    and then check out this vid
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iR49mqmPo9A
    i think this is the chick that is mentioned in the Herald article.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  198. #198
    Devo
    Reputation: SelfPropelledDevo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Condors...
    you got to check out this article in the Monterey Herald
    http://www.montereyherald.com/local/ci_5915850

    and then check out this vid
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iR49mqmPo9A
    i think this is the chick that is mentioned in the Herald article.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  199. #199
    Devo
    Reputation: SelfPropelledDevo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    3,617

    Mary...

    today didnt turn out much at all what i had thought

    instead i ended up giving a single speed a bunch of attention.
    i installed the avid disc brakes
    and decided to try out this On One Mary Bar
    its a trip.
    i think i'd like a shorter stem
    first impression i've noticed having your weight back further.
    that is trippy

    so the Pug didnt get its new drivetrain today
    maybe tmrrw, or the next, or the next...

    the DISS is a cool bike
    i've got 2 of them
    this one is a 19.5 frame geared 32x17t i believe
    it seems to have plenty of torque.
    im kind of curious to ride it in the dirt
    see what the hub bub is all about

    at times i've wanted to put the Mary bar on the Pug, but i cant seem to bring myself to it. i've become so accustomed to the current set up.

    i tried the bar upside down
    mostly cuz i thought i would like the way it looked
    but it was way to wacck
    didnt look right
    plus the position was beyond stupid
    perhaps with a short riser stem, Mary upsided down would be cool
    something about those swoopy upside down handlebars that suggests SPEED!
    flash gordon-esq
    but not the bike for that style

    as you can see, some kind of Retro Tec, Black Sheep, racing cruiser is flashing thru my mind.
    a KM with Salsa flared road bars?
    Sram groupo?
    Salsa Momasita?!
    i wonder if i could figure out how to get a road Compact crankset on it
    mated with SRAM road group
    avid road mech discs
    and somekind of cool fat-ish commuter slick

    my brain flashes with bikes
    suddenly i've opened my pocket book
    the consumer in me has woken up

    my shorts are so thin that people would comment on them
    so i placed a Voler order
    $300 later...new shorts, shirts, jersey, accessories
    hopefull that will last me another 2yrs.
    it seems about that long since i placed an order

    New Light and Motion Li-ion ARC Ultra
    drive train for the Pug
    brakes for the salsa
    new clothing
    hammer nutrion order
    and some things from Chrome (cell phone holders)
    1k easily lighter
    back to Scrooge McDuck

    maybe eBay off that SS
    Attached Images Attached Images
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  200. #200
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KavuRider's Avatar
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    4,745
    Devo
    I tried the Mary bars, wasn't too crazy about them. At first, I thought they were cool, but I could never find a comfortable position on them. Tried so many different setups, but I think I'm just too used to flat bars or risers. I put a narrow flat bar on my Xtracycle - hoo boy, after riding only DH bikes with 28" bars, going to something that narrow is crazy!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

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