Rockshox Reba team 2010 setting up?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Rockshox Reba team 2010 setting up?

    I have tried the advised settings from Rockshox listed on the fork leg for my 2010 reba Team but i am just not getting on with it that well. I weigh 160lbs and i seem to get all the way through the travel without much trouble on the advised rockshox pressures. I am not sure if this is down to poor setup of the damping and floodgate settings rather than the psi i run in the fork.

    Can anyone advise me what psi i should run in + and - chambers and also a rough base setting for damping and floodgate settings? Just want to start again with the setup really from a rough base other people have had joy with.

    Also what sag should i run on a 100mm travel fork?

  2. #2
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    Hope this helps.

    Check your manual and/or download here: http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/...00%20print.pdf

    Air settings also on fork leg.

    Follow it to the letter.
    Work out how much air you lose by attaching/detaching the hose.
    To do this, just pump it to say 100psi exactly. Take the hose off as fast as pos. Put it back on. See current pressure. You lost about half the diff in each operation (although a little more reattaching for reasons I won't go into).

    You will notice that you lose a load more from the -ve chamber. This is cos it is smaller. So when the same amound of air comes out, it is a greater percentage of the air in the smaller chamber.

    Just overpump the chambers by half the diff in their specific case and you will be fine. Works for me on my Recon solo, Reba Team dual and Lyrik two-step anyway.

    I have '09 Team.
    I weigh 190 loaded.
    I run 120+ve, 120-ve. To get that, I have to pump the +ve to about 127.5 and the -ve to about 132.5
    Rebound is 5 clicks from slowest
    Floodgate 7 clicks from open. I could run 6, but I prefer 7 for more peddling efficiency at top speed.

    For you, I would go with 105+ve (pump to about 112.5) 105-ve (pump to about 117.5).
    Rebound 5 clicks from slow.
    Floodgate 5 click from open.
    Tweak from there.
    Start tweaking with the -ve air. First reduce it by 10lb. If that makes things worse, increase it by 5lbs and see if things are better. Keep tweaking.
    I've probably got the rebound and gate settings good, but you may personally prefer a little faster rebound.
    I test by riding over rough stuff and if the fork 'packs up' I increase the rebound speed until it doesn't. One more click 'for luck' - lol - it's for margin. Leave it at that.
    Exact settings are down to personal pref with a good dose of individual bike setup and geometry. If you ride v far forward on your bike, you will want more air in the fork than if you sat way back.
    This applies to sag too. I sit fairly stretched on the XC bike. I run the fork at just over 20% sag. If I shift my weight forward, guess what happens to 'the sag'!...
    Whether or not I would need more air to compensate would depend on how far I moved....

    So, think about your pos on the bike and relate that to the 25% suggested.
    I always like to avoid going much softer (more sag) than intended. Don't want to bottom out hard.
    A lot of people set up their fork for general stuff. It's not the general stuff you need to think about (well, it is, but that's not what'll break you or your bike/fork). So I set up my stuff for the worst it'll take. This often means harder settings and less comfort generally.
    How you do it, is up to you.
    Hope my opinion (that's all it is) helps.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ecogeek
    I run 120+ve, 120-ve. To get that, I have to pump the +ve to about 127.5 and the -ve to about 132.5
    For you, I would go with 105+ve (pump to about 112.5) 105-ve (pump to about 117.5).
    Err....what???? To get 120 psi, you should be pumping up to 120 psi and unscrewing your pump.

    The air you hear upon unscrewing your pump is from the pump itself - it is not coming from the fork's air chambers....you are not losing air, from the air chambers, upon detaching the fork pump. When you reattach the pump to check your pressure "losses"(no actual air loss) you are getting a skewed reading.

    No guesstimation is required for filling up the air chambers in your fork - pump it to the desired PSI, remove the pump, and you're good to go.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncfisherman
    Err....what???? To get 120 psi, you should be pumping up to 120 psi and unscrewing your pump.

    The air you hear upon unscrewing your pump is from the pump itself - it is not coming from the fork's air chambers....you are not losing air, from the air chambers, upon detaching the fork pump. When you reattach the pump to check your pressure "losses"(no actual air loss) you are getting a skewed reading.

    No guesstimation is required for filling up the air chambers in your fork - pump it to the desired PSI, remove the pump, and you're good to go.
    Yep, that's the way it is supposed to work. I still think there is some loss, but the method mentioned above is not the right way to go about finding that loss. Bad advice IMO

    One thing that can definitely effect matters is oil level. If there is not enough oil in the fork (not entirely uncommon on a new fork) then the compression damper won't function as it should, which will have you using more travel than you should. Definitely check that out.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

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