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  1. #1
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    Your Bullseye Goes Here

    If you are the type who likes some pretty significant value for your $$ and you picked up a Dawes Bullseye, post pics and impressions here. I'll start it off.




    Just got it put together a few days ago and already have been able to do about 25 miles off road. Very decent quality bike for $349.00 and a very reasonable way to try out ss'ing. It's tight out on the trail, comes with solid components, wheels tensioned and true out-of-the-box, and it comes with BB5 disc brakes which stop it well.

    I swapped the stock riser bars for some flat bars I had lying around as well as some cushier grips. While it is heavy (29.4 lbs with the 21"), it is a lot of fun, is a pure riding experience, and has re-energized my riding this Winter.

    I'll install a tug nut on the non-drive side as well as try a 20 tooth rear cog and have enough parts lying around to gear it as a 1 X 9 and/or put a suspension fork on it if I want to. Too much fun!
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  2. #2
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    I thot it was called a Deadeye.

    --sParty
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    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    I thot it was called a Deadeye.

    --sParty
    It's a Deadeye with disc brakes...the Bullseye.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    It's a Deadeye with disc brakes...the Bullseye.
    Gotcha. Nice!

    --sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  5. #5
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    I ordered one up as an early birthday present, arrived on xmas week.

    My nearest alternative bike was the Fisher Marlin singlespeed, which the LBS had for $580. If I had the money to swing, I think the Marlin would have been a better bike for the money - compared across, the Bullseye definitely cuts $200 in corners, then consider that I'd rather have purchased from my (frankly excellent) LBS. That said, the Bullseye isn't bad at all. The finishing details are a little rough - the welds, stamped dropouts, fork ain't pretty, headset is cheap as hell but works, subtle stuff. It definitely fits together though. Arrived to me in great time, in great shape. I'll say for my unit, the concern over the caliper brackets was NOT founded, mine were aligned just fine. 185mm disks look cool, the Avid BB5s get kinda hosed on here, they adjusted in just fine for me though, and have plenty of power to launch me over the handlebars, I don't see a problem for the riding this mere mortal will do.

    What else.. wheels arrived very true, spoke tension even seems OK (according to my banjo pluck test). Front rotor arrived out of true, not a deal breaker. Oh - annoying point, the bolts Avid supplies to fasten the front caliper are too long, they hit the rotor. I had to find some little washers. Again, not a deal breaker.

    As mentioned before, the bike is heavy. 29.whatever pounds sounds right. I feel like the handlebars and stem are pretty heavy, maybe those can go for parts bin pieces to shrug a little easy weight, but this will never be the starting point for a light bike. The frame is surprisingly compact. I'm 5'10", 32" inseam, the 17" frame was smaller than the numbers seemed to suggest. Riding it commuting, I have the seat post at its maximum extension. The smaller size will probably be a benefit trail riding, if this were going to be a commuter only bike I might have preferred a 19".

    Love the paint. My friends seem undecided on the matte green-purple, but I think its dead cool.




  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbrandow
    ...the bolts Avid supplies to fasten the front caliper are too long, they hit the rotor. I had to find some little washers. Again, not a deal breaker.
    I noticed that too. Then I remembered seeing a couple small washers in the hardware baggy that came in the box. Worked great.

    My most annoying issue: The front brake housing rubbed on the headtube the first couple of rides and rubbed the "Made In China" sticker off on one corner. I almost boxed it all back up to return to BD. I decided a strategic zip tie would be an acceptable option.

    One thing I really love about this rig is the mountain/commuter flavor it has going. I can ride it to work or do a road ride and hit the trails around town as part of the route and feel I'm getting some dirt time and skills practice in along with the workout. Just seems more right than on the full squish geared.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    If you are the type who likes some pretty significant value for your $$ and you picked up a Dawes Bullseye, post pics and impressions here. I'll start it off.



    Just got it put together a few days ago and already have been able to do about 25 miles off road. Very decent quality bike for $349.00 and a very reasonable way to try out ss'ing. It's tight out on the trail, comes with solid components, wheels tensioned and true out-of-the-box, and it comes with BB5 disc brakes which stop it well.

    I swapped the stock riser bars for some flat bars I had lying around as well as some cushier grips. While it is heavy (29.4 lbs with the 21"), it is a lot of fun, is a pure riding experience, and has re-energized my riding this Winter.

    I'll install a tug nut on the non-drive side as well as try a 20 tooth rear cog and have enough parts lying around to gear it as a 1 X 9 and/or put a suspension fork on it if I want to. Too much fun!
    Is there something we need to talk about?

    BTW 22t is the ticket for where we ride

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by coiler-d
    Is there something we need to talk about?
    Nope, there's nothing to see here.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  9. #9
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    I've been searching for a SS MTB for serve as the basis for a snowbike. Eventually I'd like to convert it to an Alfine 8. Just found the BD Dawes Bullseye, and it seems for fit both what I'm looking for and my price point at this time. I really like the Avid brakes better then the Tekro's I see some other bikes are coming equiped with.

    How has the bike perform for ya? I really like that color, is that gray or copper?

  10. #10
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    @ VTF,

    Mine is the gray. The copper is more of a red-orange.

    Performance is very decent. Solid bike for the $$.

    As a pseudo-snow bike it can work well but rear tire clearance is limited. I tried a 2.2 Nevegal back there and it just cleared the chain stays. That is plenty of tire though as it also made the thing a pig to pedal plus putting a half a pound on. They didn't get the name "Nevergo" for nothing. I'm running some narrower Specialized tires now.

    I have a Tora suspension fork for it but since this is not a light frame, that extra couple of pounds is quite noticeable. The extra weight and rolling resistance of the Nevs and weight of the fork pretty much negated the 20 tooth rear cog I put on. 18 tooth is stock.

    If you want a basic, heavy, no-frills rig that serious single speeders will look down their noses at, this is the one. It's perfect for me.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  11. #11
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    Good job! She's a Beauty

    In the photo freshly unpacked, assembled, extremely happy. Ridden 6 times. Love it! Will give a small review after the photo.



    19" Frame, I am 5'11" and half... fits great. My first 29er so it seems like I am little kid riding a BMX bike again. I hope that's what I am supposed to feel?

    Started with 32-19 gearing in Florida, Flat trails, would have like 32-18 or 32-17.
    Brought the bike to Belgium ( Leuven ) very happy with 32-19. Moderately hilly. Can't keep up with friends on flats yet... but I smoke them on the rest.

    Changed the wheels out with Maddux 3.0 Single Speed specific wheels 80$ on ebay! The wheels that came with it are very generic and bolt on. However I am sure that they would work for a season or two.

    I wanted the quick releases because I am a life time member to Murphy's laws of life and flat bicycle tires and I like the stronger SS specific spoke configuration. Oh and the wheels were 80$ all-in on ebay.

    Chain Tension and Rear End:

    I was using DMR chain tugs. However those are not so good. They pull off to the side and thus become a mangled mess of metal. The chain tug that came with the bike is more than adequate for now. Surly tuggnut is the "I want bling" probably will go there later. Mainly you want a tug that pulls straight back through the drop out.

    Brakes:

    The Avid BB5 brakes are more than nice. Once you learn the trick to tuning them you are set and they work great. Wet and Dry no issue. I wish people would stop trash talking these. Mine came with two 180mm discs and they were true. I even like them as much as my XT hydraulics, maybe a little more...

    Tires

    good, soft, spongy, grip fine. Probably will go to a more mud friendly tire later in the season. The stock 2.1 WTB Nanos do the job and don't hold you back. They roll well and at 2.4bar soak up a good bit of shock. They do get a little loose in the wet and angled terrain. Be sure to use a tire with an easy to spot center line so that you can center it easily on the rear.

    Frame

    Big and heavy and steel. Indestructible! Soaks up minor bumps and vibrations that would normally irritate me on a aluminium bike. I have 19" and I am 5'11" and a bit. You could say it is on the big side for me but I like that feeling. There is a mounting hole for a caliper brake for the rear wheel. This hole helps in centering the wheel.

    Headset

    Some people complain about this. But I can't see why. It's there. It does the job and it uses standard easily replaceable ball bearing rings. It has a curvy cupped design that I believe should do a decent job of keep the icky stuff out. If I have nothing better to do then ok I can upgrade it but I don't see a need.

    Crankset

    Solid, no funky issues. It feels trust worthy when I start to mash. Using my SPD pedals. I believe ISIS drive of sorts. No issues.

    Chain

    Not sure about this. It's a KMC 6 something. So far I am still alive. I have done some considerable mashing. I trust it, but I will keep my eye on it. I just got the feeling it could some day give out and one of my shins will have permanent scare!

    Things I would/will improve

    handlebar ( very basic, no branding or marks to help with centering )
    stem ( very basic ok to start with but will upgrade later )
    wheels ( very generic and heavy and bolt on, will do the job )
    chain ( Trust but verify )

    Bar Ends. That's a personal preference. The handle grips that came with are decent and grippy no need to change.

    Overall

    FUN! Selling my geared 26er. For $399 this bike is as good as the Kona Unit or other major brand single speed 29er. I maybe lost 1kph over a 35km ride but I will get that back as soon as I have my legs of thunder which riding SS will do for you. When I finish riding I just park it in the garage. There is little maintenance to do. Spray it with water... oil the chain form time to time. check the tires, ride...

    Less Gear More Beer!

    This for me gets 5 out 5 because the price, the fun, the quality, and oh ya the FUN!

    Notes

    Get some cheap cogs from Amazon. 18,19,20 to test out what you need. There is no magic math formula that will tell you what you need. If you live in a flat place start with 32/18. You just need to try and see. The skinny cheapy gusset cogs do not "dig into your freewheel hub". I don't know who started that but disregard and avoid paying $$$$ for the Niner or Surly cogs.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    @ VTF,
    I tried a 2.2 Nevegal back there and it just cleared the chain stays.
    I have no problem on mine. I have 2.4 Ardents mounted on 35mm rims to spread them out and I have no clearance issues with the axle in the middle of the sliders.

    Get some cheap cogs from Amazon. 18,19,20 to test out what you need. There is no magic math formula that will tell you what you need. If you live in a flat place start with 32/18. You just need to try and see. The skinny cheapy gusset cogs do not "dig into your freewheel hub". I don't know who started that but disregard and avoid paying $$$$ for the Niner or Surly cogs.
    I disagree. I have had the stamped 18t on there for about a year now. On the stock wheels there was no indent, however on my new wheel set (XT hubs) the cog did dig in.
    I would agree to getting various sizes of stamped cogs to find out what gearing works for you, but I think it is necessary to then drop the $30 for a solid wide based cog (surly, niner, etc)

    I do love mine though. I started with the deadeye which is basically the same bike, but have put bb7s, new wheels, bars and grips on it. The geometry of the 19" bike fits me well, it is a little small (Im 6'3", 34" inseam) but i like how it handles and rides. A HUGE improvement over my 21" 26er jamis. I will more than likely never buy a 26er again.
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF
    Smash

  13. #13
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    brownrl:

    Great, thorough review! You might consider this http://forums.mtbr.com/29er-bikes/wr...oo-783849.html if you not already posted your thoughts in the review section. It could use the first Bullseye review under the Bullseye heading.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownrl View Post
    Overall

    FUN! Selling my geared 26er. For $399 this bike is as good as the Kona Unit or other major brand single speed 29er.
    Don't delude yourself about the Bullseye being as good as a Unit. It's not. However, you may subjectively like it as much, or feel it was a better deal, but the Unit is a better bike all day long.

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    I know I probably will live to regret this... but o well it's morning and the coffee hasn't kicked in yet.

    @OneBadWagon:

    Is the Dawes Bullseye a better bike than the Kona Unit? NO. Did I say such a thing? NO It's as good.

    Does the Kona Unit have $500 more awesomeness than the Dawes Bullseye? NO it does not. I have a Dawes Bullseye and I have test ridden 2 Units. I love them both.

    The Kona Unit has a ^"better"^: blah, blah, and blah, ok. That said, still I'd rather save the 500$. Buy a 2nd Dawes Bullseye and setup that one up for doing more road commuting or a 2nd Bullseye for the Mrs. to ride and still be ahead of buying 1 Kona Unit. $900 for a single speed MTB is just too much. It's very nice I agree 100%.

    The only thing that a Dawes Bullseye can't do that a Kona Unit can do is get you into a "Kona Unit Owners" only party, which I don't see my self wanting to attend anytime soon.

    Hope that helps to clarify my position and dispel any insinuation that I am "deluded".

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownrl View Post
    I know I probably will live to regret this... but o well it's morning and the coffee hasn't kicked in yet.

    @OneBadWagon:

    Is the Dawes Bullseye a better bike than the Kona Unit? NO. Did I say such a thing? NO It's as good.

    Does the Kona Unit have $500 more awesomeness than the Dawes Bullseye? NO it does not. I have a Dawes Bullseye and I have test ridden 2 Units. I love them both.

    The Kona Unit has a ^"better"^: blah, blah, and blah, ok. That said, still I'd rather save the 500$. Buy a 2nd Dawes Bullseye and setup that one up for doing more road commuting or a 2nd Bullseye for the Mrs. to ride and still be ahead of buying 1 Kona Unit. $900 for a single speed MTB is just too much. It's very nice I agree 100%.

    The only thing that a Dawes Bullseye can't do that a Kona Unit can do is get you into a "Kona Unit Owners" only party, which I don't see my self wanting to attend anytime soon.

    Hope that helps to clarify my position and dispel any insinuation that I am "deluded".
    My mistake. I thought your statement of:

    Quote Originally Posted by brownrl View Post
    Overall

    FUN! Selling my geared 26er. For $399 this bike is as good as the Kona Unit or other major brand single speed 29er.
    was based on something quantifiable like quality, construction, materials or design.

    Since you named names, let's see what that $500 difference between the Kona Unit and the Bullseye gets you. Objectively better:
    Kona________________________________Bullseye
    FSA External Bearing cransket___________No Name Isis junk
    Avid FR-5 levers_______________________Tektro 313 levers
    Avid BB7 brakes_______________________Avid BB5 brakes
    FSA headset__________________________Tange headset
    WTB Saddle__________________________ Dawes house junk
    WTB Speed disc rims___________________no name "double wall" rims
    WTB Ignitors__________________________WTB Nano Raptor

    SUBJECTIVELY, you feel as though the bullseye is a better value. In almost no way, shape or form is it "as good as" the Kona Unit.

    The unit probably weighs 3 lbs less than the Bullseye. That's a number shot from the hip, so it could be off, but that's a pretty big difference, and I know for a fact that the Kona P2 fork is a chunky monkey.

    Kona offers more sizes, subjectively better geometry, better (existent) service after the sale, etc. So you bought a cheap SS rigid 29er and you like it? HELL YES, enjoy it, love it. Almost any of us would. Please try to keep in mind the difference between facts and opinions. The world could use a little bit less misinformation.


    Enjoy the ride!

  17. #17
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    Today's Magic Number: 15

    It took 15 minutes for me to regret sharing something on MTBR.

    Last time I do that. All hail your great knowing everything leader: OneBadWagon

    efff it man, I'm going riding.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    Since you named names, let's see what that $500 difference between the Kona Unit and the Bullseye gets you. Objectively better:
    Kona________________________________Bullseye
    FSA External Bearing cransket___________No Name Isis junk
    Avid FR-5 levers_______________________Tektro 313 levers
    Avid BB7 brakes_______________________Avid BB5 brakes
    FSA headset__________________________Tange headset
    WTB Saddle__________________________ Dawes house junk
    WTB Speed disc rims___________________no name "double wall" rims
    WTB Ignitors__________________________WTB Nano Raptor
    The Bullseye, if it's the same as the Deadeye in this department, has an FSA Maximus crankset. I've pulled the cranks a few times and am impressed at how solid this crankset is. Definitely DH quality and weight.

    The saddle is far from junk. Of all the saddles my butt has ever touched, including Brooks and higher end Specialized and all kinds of other brands and models over the years, this saddle is the one I don't notice... brand names or lack thereof aside, it is hands down best saddle I have ever owned. If you don't want yours, I'll buy it from you. Serious.

  19. #19
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    No no won't be selling the seat. It's good and I too find it well suited for me. There is a name on it. "Velo"

  20. #20
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    @daves4mtb: You won't regret the bike. It's solid and does it's function very well. Please post a picture.

    However your opinion of single speeding will vary. With the 32/19 gearing I am able to get up and down everything around within reason ( no freaky stuff, but definitely some manly stuff ). The SS forces you to commit and overcome your fears. You'll surprise yourself for sure.

    Start with shorter rides till your muscles get worked up. I made the mistake of going 70km too early and my body/back/knees were wrecked.

    Try to get your self some cheap cogs from Amazon in order to try the sizes. Also pick up a cassette lock ring remover and chain whip. That shouldn't set you back too much.

    As a commuter bike put a 17 or 16 tooth gear on you should be right as rain. The tires that come with it are more for the dirt so maybe look for something a bit more road friendly.

    I love this bike, period.

  21. #21
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    I'm still wondering what I'll do for my SS build. Seems to me for $400 you can't go wrong if you get a whole bike and just replace parts as they wear out/break. Considering most frames start at that price alone. And those are fairly low end at that. Speaking of, how is the frame here? Steel? upgrade worthy? Things I need to consider. I could see picking up one of these when I get the cash. However I'll replace everything on it over time. The weight can't all be from the frame. I'm sure to get a complete bike under $400 there were A LOT of cut corners. Not the least of which was using the heaviest materials possible in the components. Any idea how much the frame by itself weighs?
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  22. #22
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    @Cormac:

    IIRC, I weighed my 21" frame alone and it was around 8lbs on a good scale. Not light. But, it is burly as heck.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  23. #23
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    The frame is heavy but bomb proof. Soaks up some of the vibration and gives a cushy feel. It's steel. It's heavy. It's as if you asked a German to make a bike frame.

    I am told that some people use carbon frames and gears on their bikes to go really fast. Good for them. You can buy 5 of these bikes for the same price.

    The welding on the frame "looks" fine. Certainly better than most cheap bikes. It is not brazed lugs. It looks as good as my c-dale frame. Not sloppy & uniform.

    I replaced the wheels on mine (eBay). But the wheels that come with it are ... OK.
    They are generic and heavy. Ride with them first and try it out. The wheels will be fine to start.

    The rest of the bike is rock n roll. If you're like the one guy above who only likes fancy brand names parts then you'll want to change other stuff too. There is nothing wrong with this bike. It will go down the trail and it will put a smile on your face. This bike is not a cheap K-Mart knock off. It's a real bike.
    Last edited by brownrl; 05-21-2012 at 08:38 AM. Reason: forgot a sentence

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    Quote Originally Posted by HOV View Post
    The Bullseye, if it's the same as the Deadeye in this department, has an FSA Maximus crankset. I've pulled the cranks a few times and am impressed at how solid this crankset is. Definitely DH quality and weight.

    The saddle is far from junk. Of all the saddles my butt has ever touched, including Brooks and higher end Specialized and all kinds of other brands and models over the years, this saddle is the one I don't notice... brand names or lack thereof aside, it is hands down best saddle I have ever owned. If you don't want yours, I'll buy it from you. Serious.
    My point was simply that the bike is not "as good as" the Kona Unit. The unit is an all around better bike, but it costs more. Make your decision based on budget, but other people reading that might mistakenly buy that claim, in addition to bikesdirect's inflated "MSRP" and really feel as though they're getting $1000 worth of bike for $500.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    My point was simply that the bike is not "as good as" the Kona Unit. The unit is an all around better bike, but it costs more. Make your decision based on budget, but other people reading that might mistakenly buy that claim, in addition to bikesdirect's inflated "MSRP" and really feel as though they're getting $1000 worth of bike for $500.
    Dude, let it go.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikebmx999 View Post
    Are we just ignoring balls? Lol

  26. #26
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    I've been considering my different bike purchasing options.

    - Buy a frame of some sort transfer all current components over from my old bike replacing those that won't fit on the new frame, then buy one piece at a time to put my old bike back together. Cost = well over $1k

    - Buy a road bike or cross bike

    - Build up a new geared bike and keep my current converted bike as SS and just deal with the tensioner and having to alter chain length every single time I change cogs. Cost = well over $2k, probably closer to 3 since I'd want higher end components if I'm gonna build from scratch. But not carbon.

    - Or buy a SS rig that's already complete. Which brings me back to the bullseye. Seems like really my best choice. Then I'll have a SS for when I ride alone and I can put the gears back on my current bike to have a bike for group rides. SS can be a huge hassle in a group of geared riders who spin the climbs. Getting stuck behind a spinner is just painful. And if I'm out in front, I spend to much time waiting.

    They're going for $400 right now shipped, but they have low stock in all sizes, some are sold out already. I don't have $400 yet. I keep getting distracted with smaller bike related purchases. Anyway how often does BD replenish their stock? I'll have the money in a couple months, but I'm sure they'll all be gone by then. Which is the main reason I'm gonna go with the budget option.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

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    @Cormac: Stock Issue

    Just keep an eye on the site. When I bought mine, I went with grey because the other colors were sold out. Perfectly happy. A few weeks later all the colors were back in stock. Now there all "low on stock" so it is active. It is selling. So I think Bikes Direct is active on the site and it gets replenished every few weeks.

    @Cormac: What to do Issue

    Hmm, bikes are always fun and moving parts and working on them is fun too. I once converted a normal geared MTB to SS and I have a Bullseye. The converted one was stolen but it was nice. However, the Bullseye I really think is the best choice to start SS-ing. You don't need to convert anything, no tensioner issues, no need to get a single speed chain, no single speed chainring, no odd "conversion kit issues". I do keep a geared MTB hanging around for the group rides. More and more though I am keeping up with the BE. To "properly" convert a geared MTB to SS normally will always cost you more or about the same as a Bullseye. The BE will be heavier though but it's a good kind of heavy.

  28. #28
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    I got my Deadeye off Craigslist a few months ago, got me all excited about singlespeeding. Through various bike builds, unbuilds, and mods it has transformed into my SS hardtail. The build:

    Frame: Dawes Deadeye 21" (Craigslist)
    Fork: Rock Shox Recon Silver TK Air (New)
    Crankset: Shimano XT (from another bike)
    Bottom Bracket: Shimano (from another bike)
    Chainring: Surly 36t (New)
    Chain: SRAM singlespeed w/snap-lok (New)
    Wheels: Stock Bikes Direct. Not a bad wheelset IMO.
    Tires: IRC Mythos II with tubes (New)
    Chain tuggers: Redline (New)
    Handlebars: Stock Bikes Direct
    Stem: Nice forged 75mm 6061 stem (from the parts bin)
    Grips: Forgot the brand, but they're nice Made in USA stuff. (from another bike)
    Brakes & levers: Avid Juicy 5 (from another bike) with 160mm rotors

    I'm embarassed to post a cell phone pic but I finished the build late last night and just wanted something quick to show.


    IMAG0040 by Locuscope, on Flickr

    I built this bike as a FS substitute. The heavy frame gives a plush ride and compliance over the rough stuff, and the fork (as far as I can tell) works brilliantly. My other bike is a rigid 29er SS, I just needed this one for a particularly brutal trail with rock garden/rooty descents that has made me very sad on a rigid.

    I just have to get the headset dialed in right. I think the steer tube isn't cut exactly right and adjusting the headset preload goes from loose fork to can't turn the bars in about 1/2 rotation of the star nut screw. I plan to cut a few mm off the steerer to give the top cap a little more room to compress the spacers and see if that helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HOV View Post
    I got my Deadeye off Craigslist a few months ago, got me all excited about singlespeeding.

    IMAG0040 by Locuscope, on Flickr
    Nice. Nothing wrong with this. I do notice the saddle sits back considerably on the rails. I would bend saddle rails all day if I set mine back that far. Is it because you need the cockpit space?
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

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    That's actually a non-dialed in position, but I set it like that initially because I usually need saddles there to keep my knees in line with the bottom bracket. This bike fits on the large side for me, so I probably could move it forward a bit.

    On another note, I'm going to get rid of that terrible $100 Specialized saddle in favor of the stock $7.99 Velo. Man I love that stock saddle.

    You have bent seat rails? Beast!

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    Updated:



    Sorry for the low/poor lighting.

    Here is where we are at now:
    Non Stock Stuff:

    Concept 80mm Stem
    Easton EA30 Stem 580mm Flat
    Maddux 3.0 SS Wheels
    Pro Bar Ends
    Surly Tuggnut
    BBB Water bottle and cages and field pump
    Pro Tools and Tire Box
    Shimano standard issue SPD pedals.

    I brought the bar down and in considerably because I was having lower back spasms and needed to get my back curled around a bit more and offload some weight on to the hands.

    I am currently looking for an inline seatpost or maybe even a forward sweep post.

    This is a 19'' I am 5'11''/5'10'' and the size is almost perfect just a "pinch" big. Just need to get the knees a bit more forward over the pedals better. I wish I could try the 17'' just to see.

    However, I've ridden this thing a few hundred kilometers and it's definitely my favorite. 32/19 gearing. Keeping up with the geared friends, blasting up hills, I just wish I wasn't so tied up in house renovations so that I would have more time to ride.

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    Can anyone tell me if this bike has a derailleur hanger and cable stops to be able to run a rear derailleur if I so desired?

    thanks

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    joe, yes to all the above. I've ss'ed and 1 X 9'ed mine. Fun bike on the cheap.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

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    Joe,

    I confirm too. There is a derailleur hanger and cable holders for a rear mech. The hanger is integrated with the chain tug. For running gears you don't need to tension the rear axel and can let is slide all the way in. But the mech hole is there on the chain tug.

    However there are no cable holders for a front mech. So you are looking at 1x9 or 1x10 setups. Others can verify if you need a chain guide up front to handle the chain angels.

    The rear wheel that comes with is a regular shimano capable free hub for 9sp cassettes.

    To be honest though I would really just run this single speed. If you want a cheaper geared 29er look at bikesdirect for another 29er model with gears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brownrl View Post
    Others can verify if you need a chain guide up front to handle the chain angels.
    I recommend it. I tried it for a short time w/o it and had a considerable amount of chain drops. I use the Pauls guide that mounts on the seat tube.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

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    Quote Originally Posted by brownrl View Post
    Today's Magic Number: 15

    It took 15 minutes for me to regret sharing something on MTBR.

    Last time I do that. All hail your great knowing everything leader: OneBadWagon

    efff it man, I'm going riding.
    don't regret posting, you helped me!!! So did OneBadWagon, although not for the purpose he posted for. lol

    My main ride is an alloy 105 synapse. Before that it was a 2006 CAAD8 that I drifted off pavement at 25 mph into turf sideways, I high sided myself and folded the seat stays like an accordion. Whoops.
    My second ride is a 2005 Giant cypress SX. It's a good winter/commuter all around bike, yet the shock fork blows. It also blows on anything rough because the derailleur bounce plus all of the rattle this rattle that. It's actually great for all weather road riding or slower group rides.

    Why am I here? I am looking for a fun bike, and evening bike around home. yet something capable. I am also on a budget. Originally I was looking at a Cannondale Trail 29 SL 4 too much money for what it is. Another LBS sells Haro's Okay for the money I guess.... yet I also want something maintenance free (SS).
    I'd given up on the idea of a mountain bike because most entry level bikes are blah. I don't have $2,000 for a Mountain bike.

    I'd looked into Pure fix, Motobecane, Track/road style Fixed gears.... while fun, I doubt I'd be curb jumping them, or riding them through the fields, or on dirt trails. So uh limited.

    So a SS 29'er mountain bike makes sense. It was the Gary Fisher Marlin that even got me to looking at SS 29'ers but for $600 No thanks! It meets budget, it meets being maintenance free, It meets durable, It meets fun factor, it meets curb jumping, It meets single track would I prefer a lighter bike? You bet I would, but the Kona Unit isn't going to cut it in that department either. My idea of a light 29'er SS is sub 20 lbs. Totally possible with some money (opencyle frame ). yet Why drop that kind of money on a third bike that gets ridden maybe 5 miles max in the evenings on very leisure rides. With the once or twice a year actual trail outing, if that)
    I don't even have a mountain bike at all, but I know enough to lay the smack down on a Kona Unit because in the wide world of bikes it isn't all that.


    Anyways all of that to say thanks for your posts on the Dawes Bullseye.
    If anything I am seeing maybe an upgrade to BB7 brakes ($100) and maybe a wheel upgrade?

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