Would you trust this seatpost?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Retro Grouch
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    Would you trust this seatpost?

    As some of you know I am completely rebuilding a Bontrager Race Lite. Most of the parts were so bad they were delegated to parts bin. When I stripped the bike down I noticed the seatpost looked reatively good and I figured it would be one of the few parts I would use; the brakes and stem are the other parts. Yesterday while I was recovering from my first rigid fork ride down the incline at Nisene Marks State Park; Santa Cruz, CA, in about 10 years and trying to figure out how I broke a spoke (the first time ever), I was looking at the seatpost again; it's carbon fiber! I have only ridden using a carbon fiber part once, trying out some Easton Monkey bars, The bars were okay but I didn't like the bend. The Race Lite has got to be over 10 years old, so I'm sure the seat post is newer than that. I've inspected the post with a magnifying glass and couldn't find any dents, gouges or cracks. Still, would you use this seatpost if it were your body facing catastrophic failure?

    1G1G, Brad
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    Last edited by aka brad; 10-19-2006 at 12:07 PM.

  2. #2
    Gears4Good.org
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    Roll it! Sure, I'd still use it, after an inspection like that. Just listen for odd creaking.

    BTW, you're in Santa Cruz??? I'm in Monterey. Wanna show me around the trails there sometime? I've only ridden Wilder.

  3. #3
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    ...would you use this seatpost if it were your body facing catastrophic failure?

    1G1G, Brad
    I wouldn't. But that's because I weigh 185# and I wouldn't use a carbon post even if it were brand new. I admit to being carbon prejudiced.

    It'll probably be fine. In any case, good luck, Brad.

    --Sparty
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  4. #4
    mudnthebloodnthebeer
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    Another big kid who's not putting his junk anywhere near a carbon seatpost. Yikes.

  5. #5
    Retro Grouch
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    I'm always up for a ride..

    Quote Originally Posted by seneb
    Roll it! Sure, I'd still use it, after an inspection like that. Just listen for odd creaking.

    BTW, you're in Santa Cruz??? I'm in Monterey. Wanna show me around the trails there sometime? I've only ridden Wilder.
    My days off are now Sun-Tues. PM me and we'll talk

    Brad

  6. #6
    CB2
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    I probably would, but I'm a lttle guy (under 140lbs).

  7. #7
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    it............

    uh, never mind............
    Last edited by gearless; 10-19-2006 at 04:08 AM.

  8. #8
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    I have ridden several carbon posts, and never had a problem. One is over 4 years old with several nicks in it. I also ride with a guy who is 6 foot 4 inches tall and 230 pounds. He rides a carbon post made by Bontrager that sticks out of the frame about 11 inches. It flexes, but has never broke. I trust them fully.

  9. #9
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    No no no

    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    As some of you know I am completely rebuilding a Bontrager Race Lite. Most of the parts were so bad they were delegated to parts bin. When I stripped the bike down I noticed the seatpost looked reatively good and I figured it would be one of the few parts I would use; the brakes and stem are the other parts. Yesterday while I was recovering from my first rigid fork ride down the incline at Nisene Marks State Park; Santa Cruz, CA, in about 10 years and trying to figure out how I broke a spoke (the first time ever), I was looking at the seatpost again; it's carbon fiber! I have only ridden using a carbon fiber part once, trying out some Easton Monkey bars, The bars were okay but I didn't like the bend. The Race Lite has got to be over 10 years old, so I'm sure the seat post is newer than that. I've inspected the post with a magnifying glass and couldn't find any dents, gouges or cracks. Still, would you use this seatpost if it were your body facing catastrophic failure?

    1G1G, Brad
    Never. I had an Easton Monkey bar break while speeding downhill. No way, Na da.

  10. #10
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    i have seen 2 carbon seatposts break. one was an FSA, the other bontrager.

    but who am i to speak, i ride a sibex fork!

  11. #11
    I wear two thongs
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    I'm a big guy 230 lbs and been on the same Titec (who really makes your seatpost in the picture) carbon seatpost for the last 4 yrs at least.
    Hiking is just walking where its okay to pee... Sometimes old people go hiking by accident. -Demetri Martin-

  12. #12
    velocipede technician
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    180lbs,yes i would.i wouldnt however use it on that bike, but im weird like that.
    looking for 20-21" P team

  13. #13
    Rollin' a fatty Moderator
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    Don't use it, have seen many failures at the join of the clamp and post.

  14. #14
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    No Confidence

    One of the joys of riding a single speed is the simplicity of it and not having to worry about your equipment failing. A good friend of mine broke his Easton carbon seatpost by landing on the seat after going over a small (maybe 18") drop. Once you see a carbon seatpost failure, you will never let your personnal equipment get close to one. Its their tendency to fail suddenly that gets me spooked. I'd stay clear of the seatpost, but I ride with carbon bars!

  15. #15
    Retro Grouch
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    I'm going for it..

    Already have one ride in, and I'm usually standing when I 'm going through the rough stuff anyway. One question however. The post has a maximum and mininum mark. I understand the max; but whats with the min?

    Brad

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    ... I understand the max; but whats with the min?

    Brad
    Probably defines the place where the post is thicker for clamping.

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  17. #17
    Retro Grouch
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    My bad, I have it reversed..

    Quote Originally Posted by aka Brad
    One question however. The post has a maximum and mininum mark. I understand the max; but whats with the min?

    1G1G, Brad
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Probably defines the place where the post is thicker for clamping.

    --Sparty
    I understand that their is a minimum length of the post that needs to go into the seat tube, but why would there be a maximum? (I think, Sparty, you were actually answering this question).

    Brad

  18. #18
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    I am over 200 and used this post for 4 years without failure (on a full suspension). It is a strong post. The min and max marks probably coincides with the alloy sleeve inside that reinforces the clamping area.

  19. #19
    I wear two thongs
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    On the Titec Carbon Posts they run an aluminum reinforcement tube in their carbon seat posts (I can see mine if I look through the bottom of the post) and The Max and Min line are the top and bottom of that aluminum tube indicating the strongest points to clamp the seat collar down onto it.
    Hiking is just walking where its okay to pee... Sometimes old people go hiking by accident. -Demetri Martin-

  20. #20
    Retro Grouch
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    You are right!

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Hoefer
    On the Titec Carbon Posts they run an aluminum reinforcement tube in their carbon seat posts (I can see mine if I look through the bottom of the post) and The Max and Min line are the top and bottom of that aluminum tube indicating the strongest points to clamp the seat collar down onto it.
    Now the big question; how do adjust the darn thing. There seems to be no way to adjust the the seat beyond flat or nose up. Is this the same with yours?

    Brad

  21. #21
    I wear two thongs
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Now the big question; how do adjust the darn thing. There seems to be no way to adjust the the seat beyond flat or nose up. Is this the same with yours?

    Brad
    Lots of swearing worked for me I had a similar problem but I just kept working at it I found if you loosen the bolt up alot (to the point where its almost unthreaded) I could get the seat to a comfortable spot that suited me. My saddle would always end up with the nose pointed waayyy to far up. I finally got it torqued down to a spot where I could have the nose of the saddle pointed ever so slightly down.

    Heres proof that its doable:
    Hiking is just walking where its okay to pee... Sometimes old people go hiking by accident. -Demetri Martin-

  22. #22
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    I wouldn't use a carbon seat post. Thompson all the way.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Hoefer
    Lots of swearing worked for me I had a similar problem but I just kept working at it I found if you loosen the bolt up alot (to the point where its almost unthreaded) I could get the seat to a comfortable spot that suited me. My saddle would always end up with the nose pointed waayyy to far up. I finally got it torqued down to a spot where I could have the nose of the saddle pointed ever so slightly down.

    Heres proof that its doable:


    I have a Titec post that I have ridden hard for at least 7 years. It is a little bannana'd now, but it still works fine. More like a layed back seatpost now ..You will never get the seatpost to tilt downward. If you loosen the back bolt all the way (even remove it) then sinch down the forward bolt all the way you will get the seatpost right at horizontal.



    Last edited by Mtn. Biker123; 10-25-2006 at 08:12 PM.

  24. #24
    In FTF We Trust
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    Pah, I used that same seatpost for a couple of years on my Schwinn Rocket 88, then moved it onto my Indy Fab Crown Jewel roadie where it's been for the past 3 years. I've never had a problem with it, it seems to be at least as stout as any other carbon posts I've seen. Oh, I'm 185 dry too.
    "I'll disintegrate over time if I expect my body to try to keep up with my mind" -BM

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  25. #25
    Retro Grouch
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    Shucks it was easy

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Hoefer
    Lots of swearing worked for me I had a similar problem but I just kept working at it I found if you loosen the bolt up alot (to the point where its almost unthreaded) I could get the seat to a comfortable spot that suited me. My saddle would always end up with the nose pointed waayyy to far up. I finally got it torqued down to a spot where I could have the nose of the saddle pointed ever so slightly down.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn. Biker123
    I have a Titec post that I have ridden hard for at least 7 years. It is a little bannana'd now, but it still works fine. More like a layed back seatpost now ..You will never get the seatpost to tilt downward. If you loosen the back bolt all the way (even remove it) then sinch down the forward bolt all the way you will get the seatpost right at horizontal.
    ..after the seat post met Mr Dremol.. Before and after; and not once was the Lords name said in vain..
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  26. #26
    singletrack bound
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    aka brad.....

    Here's my buddies Race Lite.....brought back to life after FS.......years!
    Now it's being ridden more than ever before!
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Yesterday while I was recovering from my first rigid fork ride down the incline at Nisene Marks State Park; Santa Cruz, CA,

    1G1G, Brad
    Waay off topic, but...

    ...some of my earliest MTB experiences (on good trails anyway) were at Nisene Marks back in the late '80s, what an amazing place!!! Often used to take off right after school at Cabrillo (on that wicked steep trail on the east side of campus) and go exploring through there on my way home. Other days I'd just head out there through the main entrance closer to the train tracks for some of the funnest riding around, what a blast and what a special place!

    Back when I was there locals knew about it but it was still fairly low key, is it still the same or is it overrun these days? Man, I've got to get back there sometime.

    Cheers!

  28. #28
    singletrack bound
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    I think after the 89 quake is when the park was found out. I remember doing cross country runs out to Maple Falls off of Bridge Creek trail in the early 80's. Then the winter of 82 washed all the trails out along Bridge Creek up to the falls and you could barley hike to them. Isn't that around the time mountain biking began? Winter of 85 closed Aptos Creek Rd with a large slide right at the West Ridge T.H. I think it stayed closed from that slide for over two years and hikers and bikers hiked over the slide and enjoyed the park. St Parks finally put a culvert in and I did some volunteer work for a couple of days wheelbarrowing drain rock into and around the culvert. Bikes have come a long way from those days. I spend most my time on my SS now though.
    Well,I must be getting old thinking of these days of long gone by. But....I still ride and get three or four in a week in that same forest.....
    I never get tired of the forest. If you haven't been in there latley, now is a good time. The colors of fall are sweet!
    Tone.

  29. #29
    ballbuster
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    Sure!

    I'm 200# and ride a Specialized 27.2 carbon post on my race hardtail. Works fine, no issues. Just don't over tighten the seatpost clamp... and don't grease it.

    Does your wife know you put dirty bike parts on the linen tablecloth?

  30. #30
    Retro Grouch
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    It's still there

    Quote Originally Posted by Sevadari
    Waay off topic, but...

    ...some of my earliest MTB experiences (on good trails anyway) were at Nisene Marks back in the late '80s, what an amazing place!!! Often used to take off right after school at Cabrillo (on that wicked steep trail on the east side of campus) and go exploring through there on my way home. Other days I'd just head out there through the main entrance closer to the train tracks for some of the funnest riding around, what a blast and what a special place!

    Back when I was there locals knew about it but it was still fairly low key, is it still the same or is it overrun these days? Man, I've got to get back there sometime.

    Cheers!
    Best to ride it during the week; the weekends get pretty crazy. Right now they have disc'd the road to the bottom of the incline so you have to ride through a lot of gravel. Once you get past Sand Point things really thin out and you can climb and decend in peace. As you work your way up to the entrance to Demo Forest there is a blanket of leaves. The ride down is almost magical because you can't see the path, only leaves. 'mI still tweaking my new Bonty and will most likely try out the newly adjusted canti's tomorrow. I usually ride Monday or Tuesday (my days off) but 'm thinking of doing a night ride once a week. PM if you you want to meet.

    1G1G, Brad

  31. #31
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    Let see some pics!

    Brad - can we see the finished RaceLite??
    "Take it easy, if it's easy...take it again"

  32. #32
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    I had one

    I used that post for about 18 mo on a Surly and a FS ride and with me at 185 it held and rode fine. I used a Selle Italia Trans Am with the cutout so adjusting it was no problem

  33. #33
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    Check it out...

    Quote Originally Posted by cjpavlov
    Brad - can we see the finished RaceLite??

    22 lbs of fun..

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=238333

  34. #34
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    you should be fine. parts break from time to time. could be you frame. could be your seat. could be your bars. could be your stem. could be your seatpost. could taco a rim. you could just wreck because nothing broke. i have ridden many miles with carbon parts and with folks who have carbon parts and i have yet to see a carbon part fail. i hear about it all the time, but never seen it happen with my own eyes. only someone said that they heard that somneones second cousins carbon whatever failed. people do not give carbon enough credit.

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