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Thread: Winter Training

  1. #1
    GDS
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    Winter Training

    I was wandering what some people do for off season training? This is my first SS and donít want to get killed when I hit the trails come spring. How do some of you build or keep up your leg strength in the winter months. Of course it is easy if you live in CA were it is worm year round. Iím in Chicago; I can still ride when I feel like dealing with the cold. I would ride the hills here Öoh ya no hills. So riders that live on the cold what do you do?

  2. #2
    CB2
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    Off season? What off season?


  3. #3
    GDS
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    Thanks for the help

    So do you ride trails in the winter?

  4. #4
    one chain loop
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    Quote Originally Posted by GDS
    Thanks for the help

    So do you ride trails in the winter?
    most of us do. snow bikes
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  5. #5
    CB2
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    Yes. I ride year round. When the trails are too snowy, I ride the road or ride rollers, or XC Ski.
    Riding snow can be a lot of work, but you'd be surprised at how much you can ride. I sometimes put on wider tires (those are 2.55" pictured, but I've gone back to 2.1"), but that's about it.
    Some people use studs, but I'm too cheap to make the investment.

  6. #6
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    Sell your car. Commute by bike. It's what I do. I live in Wisconsin.

  7. #7
    GDS
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    That is the info that I was looking for.

    thanks

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    Wisconsin

    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Sell your car. Commute by bike. It's what I do. I live in Wisconsin.
    Today, and the rest of the week, will be very painful commutes.

  9. #9
    @adelorenzo
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    ++ commuting and ++ riding trails in the winter.

    XC skiiing is good workout for legs and arms (good for the SS) but I guess you wouldn't have much snow there for it?

    Riding the trainer is death. Mine is collecting dust.


  10. #10
    GDS
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    You are crazy man!

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    My commute today was 4F with a windchill -3F, it's really not a problem when dressed right. I do avoid the snow commute though, the roads I take are way too busy to risk that. And I'll hit the trails when they're snow covered up to a certain point. But right now the trails are mostly clear and frozen solid which totally rocks.

    I avoid the spinner as much as possible but it's there if I have to, better than nothing.

  12. #12
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    What do you commuters/winter riders do for your toes? I can't go more than 30 min w/o frozen toes.

  13. #13
    GDS
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    Cut them off

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    Quote Originally Posted by ernesto_from_Wisconsin
    Today, and the rest of the week, will be very painful commutes.
    Ha! I do not fear the cold. If you dress appropriately you can survive any temperatures. I'm not pulling a MikeSee Alaskan tour, but I do go across town on occassion besides my regular half-town commute everyday. Right now I wear a wool sock, a sealskin, my Answer Kashmirs (with Reflectix cut for the insole, it really helps), neoprene booties (and if going out for a few hours a chunk of Reflectix between the shoe and bootie, like a big toe cover), merino wool long underwear, insulated pants (although the long underwear is usually enough with a regular pant, sometimes I even wear my shants), long underwear top tucked into my lower long underwear, a t-shirt for fashion, my winter coat with the long underwear tucked into my gloves, and larger mittens over those (sometimes I wear a glove liner, glove, mitten) when it's above 10 degrees out, I wear a glove liner and my mitten), and either my big winter coat, or a sweatshirt and my wind breaker, or a long sleeve t-shirt and my windbreaker depending on the intensity of the ride and the temperature. Then I wear my headsock, hat, and ski goggles. Get good goggles so they don't fog and freeze. Mine cost $35 from REI-Outlet. All the gear you need will be less than the gas you would spend otherwise, and in the spring when everyone is huffing and puffing you look like a pro!

    88rex, what temps do you ride and what do you wear? Also, check out MikeSee's blog to see if you can get some ideas. http://lacemine29.blogspot.com/2007/...y-feet_17.html

  15. #15
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    Lake Winter Shoes one size too big with a polypropylene liner sock, then a wool sock then a Gortex over sock. If it gets reaallyy cold... toastie toes toe warmers also.

  16. #16
    is buachail foighneach me
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    5f this morning on my hour and twenty minute commute. i wore the following:

    upper body:
    snug fitting ss jersey
    wool salsa ss jersey
    long sleeve jersey
    windbreaker
    fleece lined vest

    legs:
    thermal knickers
    cycling shorts
    lightweight rain pants(it was bone dry, just used em to cut wind)

    hands:
    super warm waterproof/windproof wool blend skiing gloves.

    feet:
    smartwool heavyweight hiking socks
    beat up ripped and torn summer mtb shoes

    head:
    wool beanie under helmet.

    verdict:
    upper body:
    overkill. i was a little too warm, and most of my stuff was soaked by the time i got to work. i'll loose a layer next time, just need to figure out which one.

    legs:
    excellent. the rain pants are cheapies, and did have the negative effect of trapping all the moisture my other two layers pulled away from my body, but my legs were thoroughly warm for the entire commute.

    hands:
    excellent. warm and toasty.

    feet:
    my feet got a little chilly on the final big downhill to work, but were fine up to that point. i should have worn booties, but they're such a pain in the a$$. i have lake winter shoes on the way, so that should solve that.

    head:
    perfect.

    i also have a beard for the winter(at least) which does help keep my neck warm and keep the moisture from my breath off my chin/neck.

  17. #17
    GDS
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    Much respect for you guys.

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    we only get worms here in ca a few months out of the year and thats usually in the spring

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    5f this morning on my hour and twenty minute commute. i wore the following:

    upper body:
    snug fitting ss jersey
    wool salsa ss jersey
    long sleeve jersey
    windbreaker
    fleece lined vest
    At that temp all I would where upper body...

    Long sleeve mid-weight jersey
    Long sleeve windbreaker
    Fleece vest

    You could probably lose either the vest or the two ss jerseys (I'd lose the jerseys).

    And my feet would freeze with summer shoes, everybody is very different I'd guess.

  20. #20
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    one hour commute...

    heavy duty everest climber style gloves
    ski helmet
    ski goggles
    balaclava
    fleece top
    fleece tights
    gore-tex military pants
    helly hansen windbreaker
    arm warmers
    thin wool socks
    cabela's goretex socks
    sidi shoes
    adidas booties

    my fingers are still thawing out a bit. everything else kept me warm. Its 9 degrees right now.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by GDS
    Much respect for you guys.
    It's really not as hard as you think once you get the right clothing. The biggest barrier is in your mind.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Ha! I do not fear the cold. If you dress appropriately you can survive any temperatures.
    Umm. I don't think so. At least cycling will be too difficult dressed like that. Come february and I'm sure we'll get the usual -13F temps with wind chill hovering around -40 to -45F. You cope with that? I don't. I stay locked in. -10F (wind chill included) is all I can deal with on the trails and not much more than 2hrs or I'll be frozen solid ready for amputation.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by rinseflow
    Umm. I don't think so. At least cycling will be too difficult dressed like that. Come february and I'm sure we'll get the usual -13F temps with wind chill hovering around -40 to -45F. You cope with that? I don't. I stay locked in. -10F (wind chill included) is all I can deal with on the trails and not much more than 2hrs or I'll be frozen solid ready for amputation.
    Well, last year we had a few straight weeks of something like -20 to -30F and I'm still here and I don't have black feet. If I don't ride, I don't get where I need to go. College stays open regardless of the temperature, as does my work.

    Quote Originally Posted by ernesto_from_Wisconsin
    my fingers are still thawing out a bit. everything else kept me warm. Its 9 degrees right now.
    Try some glove liners. I couldn't keep my fingers to stay warm at all last year so I switched to mittens with liners and it is so much better. My friend uses Lobster mitts if you need some dexterity and he likes them, but his hands froze last ride. Liners keep your hands warm, the glove/mitten/lobster keeps the weather off it. I ride a fixed gear so I have no use for any controls except an emergency front brake so I just go with mittens.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Well, last year we had a few straight weeks of something like -20 to -30F and I'm still here and I don't have black feet. If I don't ride, I don't get where I need to go. College stays open regardless of the temperature, as does my work.
    Yeah. I'll do my commute too no matter what the temperature but that's a short distance with most of the suffering done on two bridges and the wind there. I seriously couln't do any decent riding in those kinds of temps, fingers and toes both go then suddenly it's not that much fun anymore.

  25. #25
    LA CH»VRE
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    I commute almost everyday, 20km per day so 100km per week on my 44x15 SS, it wont make me the fastest racer come spring but it keeps me going and prevent to have to start back from too far in my training when spring comes.

    I never get cold feet, I'm wearing light Salomon winter boots, booties over them to add another water/snow/wind barrier on flat pedals...

    For the rest, some wind/water proof over pants, a windbreaker over a light fleece with a shirt that dries fast underneath... Goggles, good gloves/mittens (I use cheap Lobster type with thin undergloves when it's really cold) and something to hide my face and neck well.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  26. #26
    Live, Freeze, and Ride
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    OP was about training in winter.... I just learned to skate ski before dislocating my elbow, still gonna try with just one pole because it was so much fun, I also ride my trainer in the morning, sometimes (like when i have 2 arms) I ride on frozen snowmobile trails and things i've packed snowshoeing, and snowshoeing to pack out a trail can be great exercise.
    But if you don't have much snow follow all the gear advice and suit up and ride!
    Inbred 29er Dinglespeed
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    I work for a bike parts company

  27. #27
    GDS
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    Quote Originally Posted by dumbaSS
    It's really not as hard as you think once you get the right clothing. The biggest barrier is in your mind.

    I hear you. I don't mind the cold, but I sweat like a pig evan a 15-20 minute commute. Plus I don't have the $$ to buy all that gear right now. Still 5F is a little to cold maybe 25-30f.

  28. #28
    @adelorenzo
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    My commute today, -10 C (14 F), although I wear the same thing down below -30 C (-22 F):

    Blundstone boots
    Wool socks
    Dress slacks
    Dress shirt + tie
    Anorak
    Moosehide/beaver fur mittens
    Wool balaclava



    Regards,
    Anthony

  29. #29
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    Strathpuffer

    In Scotland they have a 24 hour race in January at a place called Strathpeffer which is 57.35N which is almost the same as Juneau, Alaska.

    This makes for some potentially interesting weather, which rather than staying obligingly below zero is often soddenly wet sleet. Many find it harder to keep warm in that than at subzero - apparently you lose body heat 40 times faster if you're wet.

    StrathPuffer website

    StrathPuffer forum

    Is it the toughest 24 hour race in the world?
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57ļ36' Highlands, Scotland

  30. #30
    is buachail foighneach me
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    i would much, much rather ride in bitter cold than just around/above freezing and raining.

  31. #31
    @adelorenzo
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    i would much, much rather ride in bitter cold than just around/above freezing and raining.
    ++ on that one. Getting wet and cold sucks. If I had to deal with rain, sleet, slush, ice and all that crap I don't think I would ride year round. Just give me the cold and snow, thanks!

    That's why Jill in Juneau, Alaska is so amazing. That is the worst cycling environment, IMHO.

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