Will Focusing only on SS Revive my Passion for Mountain Biking?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 26 of 26
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    534

    Will Focusing only on SS Revive my Passion for Mountain Biking?

    I have mountain biked throughout my life. Stopped in middle school, then got back into it late high school and kept going through college. But past couple years I've been working full time on a startup, and having barely mountain biked even though I grew my fleet quite a bit: I got a rigid 26 ss mid college to complement my all-around trail bike. Then I sold that fs bike to get a serious AM bike plus a fs racey 29er.

    Recently, I turned my ss into a 26b am ss, but haven't ridden it more.

    Sometimes feels like a hassle dealing with so many bikes. I'm wondering if I should try to exclusively ride the SS until I can get back into it. I'm also thinking that ss forcing me to go on shorter rides will help prevent the feeling of being drained from high volume that I think disrupts the focus I need to have on my startup.

    Anyone have suggestions or experience with a similat situation?

  2. #2
    Just A Mountain Biker.
    Reputation: blaklabl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,352
    Been there, done that. SS will help get your groove back, but may also make you not want to ride anything else in your quiver. Or it may make you want to ride everything in your quiver. But yes, the correct answer is always SS.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    MTBR: Your dad's online mountain bike forum.



  3. #3
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,657
    Quote Originally Posted by michael1 View Post
    Anyone have suggestions or experience with a similat situation?
    Everything in life is a similar situation to a degree. That's because our energy flows where our attention goes.

    We live in this wonderfully free country where we're unimpeded to have the things we choose and do whatever we want. Whatever it may be, around here we're lucky enough to get it. Winners in the genetic lottery, one might say.

    May I suggest you look through the opposite end of the telescope for a moment? Instead of looking ahead, look where you are. This is where you wanted to be now. You put yourself here.

    A tree is judged by the fruit it bears. Congratulations.

    If you want to get back into biking, you will. You don't need a singlespeed; what you need is desire. If you don't want to get back into biking, you won't. In any case the vehicle won't matter.

    Only our priorities matter.

    In a year or two, look back. If you're cycling at that time, it will reveal that cycling was what you wanted now.
    =sParty

    P.S. Meanwhile try the singlespeed.
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    534
    I don't disagree with you... my life is what I chose to make of it and as I wrote this post I realized it was a bit silly to be looking for "1 weird hack to reignite your mountain biking passion".

  5. #5
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,022
    My rigid SS makes me smile every time I ride it. Much more than the FS, roadie or gravel bike.

  6. #6
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    625
    I love my bike, a 29er ss. It's perfect for what I need and do. More than 2 years and still a honeymoon. I've sold one other bike and trying to sell another.

    I think you should consolidate to a single bike, could be you need a new love, take youre time to find it and test ride a bunch of stuff. Might be youre craving a ss - certainly it brings me the most satisfaction - but I bet it depends on the rides you do.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    534
    I thought about selling the other bikes, but I put so much time into selecting parts for my am fs, including finding the perfect fork. Maybe I should sell the cannondale scalpel though.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    445
    SS is the only way Padawan


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SingleSpeedSteven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    527
    Does your startup have you stressed out? I ask because I have massive GAD issues, and I go through phases where it's hard to convince myself to ride. I always have a bunch of anxious BS running through my head, so I will start thinking things like "if I had a 160 travel bike I bet that would be the ticket to me wanting to ride more". The real issue is that I just need to make myself go ride. Once I get back into the groove of riding enough to burn energy and stress away, I realize that the bikes I have are perfectly capable.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    986

    Will Focusing only on SS Revive my Passion for Mountain Biking?

    Iíve found in life that if I was at a certain level with something...work, fitness, biking...that I often feel compelled to get back to that level.

    For example, I used to ride more often, longer, and faster a couple years ago. But due to my recent work schedule Iíve been riding half as often, half the distances. When I convince myself that itís ok to ride like that I enjoy it much more and appreciate that at least Iím riding and its better than not riding at all.

    I do think SS encourages riding. Thereís something about the simplicity that makes you just want to ride. Also, I feel you can make an SS ride feel more fulfilling even when doing short rides.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    jl
    jl is offline
    climb
    Reputation: jl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,292
    Here's a suggestion that might or might not reignite your passion. Do a 30-day biking challenge--meaning decide to ride _a_ bike everyday for 30 days, even if it is just around the block.

    If you do this, you'll quickly evaluate what bikes will get you outside and for what reasons. Right now I'm riding a fixie-commuter bike more than all of my other bikes, but I get out on two wheels almost everyday. And when I ride the dirt, if I don't have much time, I always grab the single-speed (more bang-for-the-buck) for rides 90 minute or less rides.
    We don't need more to be thankful for; we just need to be more thankful.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fixgeardan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,168
    Wow!Nicely put Sparticus thanks I think I needed to read this today. And yes just go ride in the outdoors.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,027
    Sent one of your extra bikes to me. I will carry your burden.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jack Burns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,875
    Love what has been said here.

    Just ride something, and ride again.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,053
    I like to switch things up based on the trail. If I only had the SS to ride, Iíd probably end up riding less.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    28
    I went a step down with a 650b rigid coaster braked bike...Havent ridden any other bike since. Too much fun (and challenging)!

  17. #17
    Not a role model
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,034
    You sound like you need variety.

    Singlespeed would likely be merely one bike in your quiver, as it may prove to be difficult to give up other options in the long run. Singlespeed makes everything more of a challenge.

    If you ride the same few trail networks, you *need* variety in order to keep things fresh--don't give up the quiver if this is the case, instead expand it.

    If your quiver is too high maintenance, and you have a lot of freedom in picking bikes to buy, you have the option to kill the quiver by buying a "super bike", which tends to be so pricey that you can't afford other bikes. The super bike should ideally be super capable and super versatile, and should be fed a balanced diet of various trails, requiring you to visit new trails in order to keep things fresh.

    Consider your preference in challenges and lifestyles your decision. Singlespeed is great for Spartan-like functionality--you gotta run what you brung, brute forcing your way through challenges. Having a quiver may seem to promise comfort and convenience, but it's not compatible with a laidback lifestyle, as you'll find your storage area overrun with bikes, parts, and tools that is beyond your management capabilities. Planning on getting out of your comfort zone and bubble of familiarity is a challenge in itself, discovering new trails and riding them yourself; not one for the meek, who need reassurance and motivation from others to even initiate action.

    I believe mtb is all about discovery. It's about learning more about the world, and yourself. You can go in-depth, with the physics and biology--whatever it is, it's about getting something out of the experience, after putting something in. Time, effort, money, planning... just open yourself up. What are you afraid of? What's there to lose? Why wait? What do you want from strangers from this forum? Do you want one of us to read your mind, or research you and your past, and say something agreeable based on the very limited info you gave out? If we do, what do we earn, as if we needed a motivator? Or is this some contest that we make an effort to get you to agree with us, with such agreement being the reward? xD

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    5,095
    I have 4 bikes including my road bike and I like to rotate use and pick the right bike for trail/experience I am after. I have FS XC bike 100/100, FS trail bike 125/130 and SS Rigid 29+

    I love my SS for shorter rides and for the challenge. My latest challenge was to change from 29 (2.35/2.2) with 100mm fork to 29+ (3.0) with rigid fork. It is something different that keeps me fresh to change how I ride. This spring I raced my SS for sprint races and it was fun. I raced my XC FS for longer races mid summer and that was fun too. Then this fall I dragged out my 5" bike for so enduro style shuttle rides and gnar training. Fun also.

    Just yesterday I took my SS out at a rocky bit of trails with some steep climbs that I took my XC FS too a little over a week ago. Fun, but different riding experience. If I had to have only 1 bike it probably would not be the SS, but since I can have multiple bikes I am not getting rid of the SS. Just too much fun and easy to maintain .

    Why is it fun? Just the challenge of it really. After all we ride bikes not because it is easy, but because it is hard. One gear is certainly not easy, but so rewarding when done right.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  19. #19
    Combat Wombat
    Reputation: BrianU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,406
    A different approach...do you have anyone to ride with? I have also had a crazy year. Life at home has gotten very hectic. Crazy hours and the "beatings will continue until moral improves" mentality at work has gotten to where if I am not dealing with one or the other, I just want to sit on my ass or tinker in the garage.

    The majority of my riding is solo on local trails. I enjoy the solitude, it clears the mind and being nearby, I can get there, ride a couple hours and still have plenty of time to get home and take care of other responsibilities. Due to a record wet summer, places to ride on a regular basis were very limited this past year. The one trail that is pretty much consistently open is a 55 mile drive one way and if there was ever a trail made for gears and suspension, this is it. And I ride a rigid SS.

    I have a couple friends that ride there nearly every Sunday morning and usually send out a text Saturday night to a small group to see who is interested. Usually get this text while I am at work and always say yes. By the time I get home, I hope to squeeze in 4 hours sleep before getting up to make the drive to the trail. Without a doubt, 99% of the time if it was not for the fact that I knew there would be a couple guys waiting for me in the parking area, when that alarm clock goes off, I would say screw this and go back to sleep.

    Stifling hot or bitter, wet cold, ten minutes into that ride and there has never, ever been a single time when I was not thankful for being out there riding. Typical two to four of us at a casual pace with the primary focus on cleaning sections of the trail. A post ride beer and it is back home. That morning makes life a thousand times better. As long it is on a bike I enjoy riding, I don't think it would really matter which bike.
    Last edited by BrianU; 11-29-2018 at 11:54 AM. Reason: typo

  20. #20
    Just A Mountain Biker.
    Reputation: blaklabl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,352
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianU View Post
    A different approach...do you have anyone to ride with?
    There is a lot to this. Like you (OP), I find myself languishing in the ďwhat bike will get my stoke backĒ conversation with myself, when in reality itís a combination of things that really have nothing to do with which bike I have or ride. (A little background; 31+ year rider, done pretty much all the disciplines, kinda settled on xc at this stage and a bit of a self-proclaimed retrogrouch.)

    A few things; I got sober 6 years ago after hard 15+ year drinking career. During the last 6 years, the link between craft beer and mountain biking has gotten so strong that itís almost impossible to do anything around a mountain bike, including going to your LBS, without someone shoving a beer in your face. Due to that, I have pulled back a lot of my riding with people because I just donít want to be around it. That leads to a lot of solo riding.

    Next thing, when I got sober I promised myself I wouldnít force myself to get up early to ride. Honestly, I was finally sleeping good and realistically I hate getting up early and it makes me resent the ride, so if I donít enjoy it, I wonít do it. So many people that I did ride with still get up and ride before their families get up and ďget it out of the wayĒ so they can do whatever mundane family activities they want and get less static at home. Well, my kids are in high school now and I have a good understanding with my wife so those things donít apply to me. The few people I would ride with donít want to give up a chunk of the middle of their day to ride, so that also leads to a lot of solo riding.

    Final thing; as I have gotten older and my job has forced me to do longer commuting to the office, my tolerance for ďloading up the bikeĒ and driving some more to go ride is less appealing. I finally am at a point in my life where I can ride to a trail system from my driveway (something I always wanted) and get in a couple hours, 20 miles, without much pre-plan or hassle. In fact, thatís what has led to my main bike being a rigid SS, less hassle and mental game, less maintenance, etc. But, because itís not the most exciting trails in Arizona and itís more of a fitness XC thing at this point, I donít have a lot of people lining up to ride with me. This also leads to a lot of solo riding.

    Reading this back, I realize itís a bit of a ramble. But the common thread throughout my situation is riding alone. While I enjoy the solitude, I also think that I have put myself in this position due to my inflexibility that makes me ďless stokedĒ on riding because I get bored and quite frankly am lonely. Iíve fallen into the trap before thinking a new bike or new parts would somehow make the stoke magically return, and Iím here to tell you it doesnít for me. Iíve spent more than I care to think about chasing that ideal, when realistically maybe some company and some people to share it with would make it actually reappear.

    Sorry for the length of the post, hope it gives you something to think about.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    MTBR: Your dad's online mountain bike forum.



  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jack Burns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,875
    This past year has been an enthusiastic period of single speeding to me. I haven't needed motivation to ride.

    I've been commuting to work on a geared bike. When the days were long I'd even get to switch bikes and go single speeding on a local trail system after work. Sometimes my wife would join me on her single speed bike.

    An obsession with building different single speeds manifested. A search for a magical ride. My wife thinks I'm nuts, and has been critical.

    For me, trying a few different bikes a week has been a lot of fun and instructive.

    Together we both stopped drinking and became vegan in the spring of 2017. Over the years much of the group(s) we rode with often ended with beer. The beer got stronger, and the rides for some, seemed to become drinking occasions.

    It didn't seem right to me. We both stopped the social post ride drinking a long time ago (but to be honest if I could get my wife to drive, I might imbibe).

    I single speeded more and more, and did it solo quite a bit.

    My wife is happy to see that all the SS bikes get ridden. I take them out in random rotation. Around here it use them or lose them when it comes to bikes.

    Some motivation :

    Use your bike or not be able to justify its ownership.

    Fear of losing the fitness to climb on your single speed.

    Get high on riding and high on life.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk

  22. #22
    Combat Wombat
    Reputation: BrianU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,406
    Quote Originally Posted by blaklabl View Post
    when realistically maybe some company and some people to share it with would make it actually reappear.
    That Sunday morning ride I was talking about, is not just a ride with a couple other people I know. It is as much about spending time with good friends and enjoying their company. Makes all the difference in the world for me.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    534
    Yep, startup does cause me anxiety to the point where a small obstacle toward riding liking having to adjust a derailleur will make me not feel like going. I really appreciate all the suggestions and feedback people are offering.

    I have mostly been a solo rider and I find that more convenient, plus I enjoy the solitude.

    Another thing I forgot to mention for why ss focus might be good for me: I also really like hiking up mountains (peak bagging) and I think the absence of mountain biking has been a big part of my loss in hiking fitness. I think ss might be far more effective from a cross training perspective. It should also be better to cross train for rock climbing.

    Anyway, I'm thinking I should sell my Scalpel, which isn't all that much fun imo, and replace it with a Nimble 9 ss. Then I can have another trail/am bike, which is how I mostly ride, plus it can work for xc and bikepacking since my current ss is a 26b ibis tranny. Then I'll only have one geared mtb to deal with.
    Last edited by michael1; 11-30-2018 at 11:46 AM.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    986
    Quote Originally Posted by michael1 View Post
    Anyway, I'm thinking I should sell my Scalpel, which isn't all that much fun imo, and replace it with a Nimble 9 ss
    Great choice. I run mine SS too.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Andy R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    733
    All I know is that if I hadnít built my first Singular Hummingbird seven years ago I probably would have given up riding altogether. Donít ask me why but there is some kind of special synergy between me and that bike (well, actually, I have three - two steel and one Ti). Itís like the custom bike that I would have had made - nimble and poised in slow, trialsy stuff and yet stable and planted at speed. Like some kind of magic - itís apparently the bike that I ride far better than any other, according to those I ride with occasionally.
    So, itís not so much just singlespeed as that particular bike for me. Itís a real and almost unheard of gem.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    534
    Went on a nice ride today with the singlespeed and I think it will work out...

    Ended up buying a Nimble 9 SS and going to sell my Cannondale Scalpel -- it was too racey for me anyway.

Similar Threads

  1. First MTB - focusing on a quality frame
    By CeeZar in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 09-12-2016, 06:53 PM
  2. focusing a lot more on Power Interval Hill Repeats
    By jimPacNW in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-30-2013, 09:38 AM
  3. How to revive the Passion
    By OttawaTom in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-06-2013, 06:50 AM
  4. Focusing
    By gamb in forum Photography for mountain bikers
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-07-2011, 08:25 AM
  5. Cree XR-E - Reflector & optics (focusing lens)?
    By 02Slayer in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-10-2007, 11:17 AM

Members who have read this thread: 8

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.