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Thread: Why Rigid?

  1. #1
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    Why Rigid?

    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.

  2. #2
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    Because it's there.
    Nobody cares what kind of bike you ride.

  3. #3
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    Why not?

  4. #4
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    My 1x1 is an all around commuter & light trails ride. Being light, simple and quick are its key elements. It will never have a suspension fork.

    However, my 40 lb. trail bike will never see a rigid fork.

    If I only had one bike it would have a suspension fork though.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
    lighter, cheaper and more reliable...
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
    holy crap
    i wonder why no one has ever asked that question before
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Locoman
    My 1x1 is an all around commuter & light trails ride. Being light, simple and quick are its key elements. It will never have a suspension fork.

    However, my 40 lb. trail bike will never see a rigid fork.

    If I only had one bike it would have a suspension fork though.
    I too have many bikes for different purposes. I own an Il Pompino commuter that's rigid and singlespeed for instance. My question is in reference to trail bikes only.

  8. #8
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    I have never blown the seals on my rigid fork.
    I don't have to change the oil.
    The bushings won't ever wear out cause there ain't none.
    My rigid fork doesn't dive when I brake before a turn.
    The heaviest rigid fork is lighter than the lightest suspension fork.
    $180 for a high end rigid vs. $700 for a high end susser.
    I like it when my hands go numb through shudder bump sections.

  9. #9
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    lighter

    better climber

    man up

  10. #10
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    djcweed, If you truly do understand the idea of Single Speeding and being simple than having the rigid fork is in that same thought having no parts to go wrong (of course some of you have broken rigid forks but it is the idea of having less to go wrong). The thought is to eliminate all possible problems, there are obviously a lot more parts to damage (like the lockout you speak highly of...just one more new option to break) on the trail with suspension than a simple rigid fork. I ride suspension up front but am going rigid tonight for these same reasons of less to go wrong. Either way, ENJOY
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  11. #11
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    The feel, man,,,,,

    I love the instant ,precise feel a rigid gives and i have yet to ride a lock-out/sus fork that steers as precise as a rigid.
    I also have yet to climb on a locked-out fork that doesnt move a little....
    I am also 52 and need the harsh,bone-jarring ride...

  12. #12
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    Winter riding is a good reason for riding ridid. When its very cold suspension gets sluggish and sometimes isn't needed as packed snow contours trail features.
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  13. #13
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    The steering precision is notable. I have a Fox 100mm on my Racer X and a steel Vicious fork on my SS Bontrager, and there's no comparison.

    Having a lighter front end shows itself whenever I need to "snap" the front wheel up/over obstacles.

    I think the biggest benefit comes with all of the out of the saddle pedaling. I can't imagine manually locking out a suspension fork every time I get out of the saddle on the SS. A fork with threshold valving won't have this issue of course, but it still lags on the other two points.

  14. #14
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    Simple. Reliable. Lightweight. Inexpensive. Challenging. Fun.

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    Cos they're so perty...





    Seriously though, I've just got a set of rigid Dekerf Tuning forks, I've been riding SS for a while now and I'm loving it so much, I thought I'd try going rigid for a while and try and develop some lost bike handling skills.

    I'm really enjoying the rigid ride, however my wrists are suffering big time! I don't think there's any harm in swapping between rigid and suspension forks, which is what I'll do for the time being...

  16. #16
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    Indeed there is enlightment to be found in understanding the answer to the question. For there are as many reasons why people ride rigid as there are flowers in the spring, yet there is also only one reason why people will ride a rigid bike.

  17. #17
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    because i like picking lines, its challenging and fun, and when i have a sus fork, i get lazy.

    because when i point a rigid bike somewhere, it goes there.

    because i ride a redline monocog 29er, and refuse to put a $400 fork on a $500 bike.

  18. #18
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    Amen brother.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nonracerrichie
    I have never blown the seals on my rigid fork.
    I don't have to change the oil.
    The bushings won't ever wear out cause there ain't none.
    My rigid fork doesn't dive when I brake before a turn.
    The heaviest rigid fork is lighter than the lightest suspension fork.
    $180 for a high end rigid vs. $700 for a high end susser.
    I like it when my hands go numb through shudder bump sections.
    While I love my FS bike, I also really appreciate the simplicity of a SS with a rigid fork. At this point in my life, riding time is very limited and when the opportunity comes up to get a ride in, I have found that I am not concerned with how fast I can go or what kind of workout I am getting. Its all about how long I get to spend out in the woods just riding and not thinking about the million other things that I have to deal with right now. With a rigid SS, its basically check the tires and I am out the door. And do you know how a SS gives the same old local trails a new twist? A rigid fork adds to that experience.

    Brian

  19. #19
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    Gee, if there were NO benefits to rigid forks, then why don't road bikes have suspension? Roads have bumps too.

    Reality: rigid forks are lighter, cheaper, maintenance-free and steer more precisely. Of course they ride rougher (duh), but did you really think you get that smooth ride for free? As with anything else, there are tradeoffs to be made. Do what works for you.
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  20. #20
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    Why Rigid ?

    ...Because ... I like the challenge ... the simplicity ... the light front end ... and the pain ...


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  21. #21
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    The gals at the trail head like it rigid.
    Tuff Schist

  22. #22
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    Simpler, lighter, more reliable, steers better. Why suspension?
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  23. #23
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    rigid

    Alot of my riding is slow speed technical woods riding that has a trials influence so a suspension fork is a hindrance to me.Saying that sometimes i like to ride with guys on full suspension so i will put my sus fork on for those occasions.Rigid forks still have so many advantages, even these days when sus forks are the norm.

  24. #24
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    Because I can

  25. #25
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    don't need it

    Because with a 29 inch wheel you don't need it.

    I just switched to an On-One rigid 29er fork. The difference isn't all that much on xc trails. A little more abuse, but it's a mellow fork and the wheels smoothe out a lot.

    It does improve your bike handling skills.

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  26. #26
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    Cause it's pure & simple? Why rigid with disc

    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
    brakes?

  27. #27
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    Because my 29er rips as a rigid. It hammers rockgardens. It is quite shocking.

  28. #28
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    if you need to ask, it's probably not for you.

    otherwise, many fine, and even a few inspiring comments above.

  29. #29
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    Why rigid, because it hurts your wrists. Picking lines is fun as hell, but the errant rock or root that nails your wrist sucks. I rode my Unit rigid for two months. I loved it. I didn't want to put the fork on that I had ordered. I put it on anyway, and no more wrist pain. I can pick lines with the best of them, but at 200 solid pounds, it is just too much for my wrists to take. I don't miss the rigid fork...EVER. Did I miss the suspension fork? Yes...many times...even while loving the ride.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  30. #30
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    because my everyday modern lifestyle is too easy already. I enjoy being "stimulated".
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  31. #31
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    Simplicity.

    The rigid fork definately looks better but yes it beats the heck out of you. I grew up on bmx bikes and then in the early nineties bought a $900 rigid stumpjumper. I never looked back and with the wisconsin singled track I don't have to much to be nervous about. When I was out in Colorado springs I got some weird looks from the guys at Rock Shox and when we rode I found out why. The local terrain is what it's about. I can get away with it.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by creepyfriendly
    The rigid fork definately looks better but yes it beats the heck out of you. I grew up on bmx bikes and then in the early nineties bought a $900 rigid stumpjumper. I never looked back and with the wisconsin singled track I don't have to much to be nervous about. When I was out in Colorado springs I got some weird looks from the guys at Rock Shox and when we rode I found out why. The local terrain is what it's about. I can get away with it.
    Get away with it? Man, I saw you ride (briefly) at the SSWC05. You can rock a rigid like few others can. You don't come in first at State College without skills.
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  33. #33
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    Why Rigid?
    1. Big popeye arms
    2. Numb hands
    3. Cheap

  34. #34
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  35. #35
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    Waaaa, waaaaa, my hands hurt, waaa waaa, I have to think about where I'm going, waaaa


    Actually, when I push down on the front end, I think it flexes slightly.

    Anyways, the rigid fork came with my free, 14 year old bike. It's no different than every other mountain bike I rode 14+ years ago. I've never ridden a suspension bike. The idea is still kind of weird.

    Anyways, I don't know how well my canti's would work on a newfangled sus fork, I don't want to risk losing that "You don't really need to slow down" feel I get from them...

    --C

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky
    because my everyday modern lifestyle is too easy already. I enjoy being "stimulated".

    F- yes.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  37. #37
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    Technical precision

    The most technical lines I've ever seen cleaned have been by dudes on SS full-rigid bikes. I'm not talking 10' drops that you need a 7" travel bike for. I mean the gnarly 1-3' drops over boulders, roots, through rock gardens with tight turns and heinous consequences...

    Granted, this is mostly a statement about ability, agility, and balance. The dudes I've seen clean that stuff could probably do it on any bike, but instead they choose full-rigid. The precision and instant response gotta be a big reason...

  38. #38
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    I understand lighter, cheaper, less-maintenance & steering precision. I agree that rigid forks excell in these areas.

    I don't understand the numb hands and sore wrists that accompany a rigid fork. Do you think your bike handling skills are better when you're numb & sore?

    I also don't agree with the people that purport that you're 'more of a man' with a rigid fork..I'm not buying it. It's as if you're saying that you're more of a man if you don't embrace technology that makes your life easier or more comfortable. You can pick good lines and ride just as hard with a suspension fork.

    To the person who stated 'if you have to ask it's not for you' I'll remind you what I said when I started this thread...I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out...I've ridden rigid and I prefer suspension.

    As it has been stated in many threads, the bottom line is to do what suits you. I'm a techno-grouch-retro-geek cyclist and I'm happy with the negative trade offs that accompany a suspension fork in order to enjoy more comfort and if you wanna ride rigid, knock yerself out.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I don't understand the numb hands and sore wrists that accompany a rigid fork. Do you think your bike handling skills are better when you're numb & sore?

    I also don't agree with the people that purport that you're 'more of a man' with a rigid fork..I'm not buying it. It's as if you're saying that you're more of a man if you don't embrace technology that makes your life easier or more comfortable. You can pick good lines and ride just as hard with a suspension fork.

    I'm a techno-grouch-retro-geek cyclist and I'm happy with the negative trade offs that accompany a suspension fork in order to enjoy more comfort and if you wanna ride rigid, knock yerself out.
    Numb hands? Sore wrists?

    Not here. The faster you go the smoother the trail gets.

    More of a man?

    Absolutely! E G O

    Is it for you?

    Maybe, but certainly not for everyone.

    Ed E

  40. #40
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    I've never suffered from wrist or hand pain because of a rigid fork.

    More of a man? You have to be a better bike handler to ride fast with a rigid fork. That's just a fact. If you pick the same lines with suspension, you aren't riding as hard. If you ride as hard, you better be doing it on worse lines, through more difficult terrain or much faster, or your suspension is just a crutch. Riding at your limit is riding at your limit. Technology may allow you to handle more with suspension than with rigid, but technology takes the credit for that. If someone on a rigid fork can hang with you on your suspension fork, he or she is a better rider.

    You asked the question. Why are you also delivering the lecture about riding what you want to ride?

  41. #41
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    you do have to do it long enough to build up your muscles to take the abuse...

    when i started, i never thought i would like it but then i got a rigid monocog and just rode it for a while. it hurt like hell at first...

    sore muscles and joints don't necessarily mean your doing something wrong, they could mean your getting stronger...

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
    Riding rigid is part dependent on your local trails. Where I live, it's mosly fireroads that I ride and a 29er combined with a rigid is just right. I have still have to pick my lines and concentrate on fast descents, but that's part of the fun.

    With that said tho, I now ride with a Reba because I am a photographer and value keeping my hands and wrist injury free. I just lock-out the Reba when I want to sprint and keep it bouncy the rest of the time.

    But rigid isn't as crazy as it seems. I've often forgotten to switch-off my lock-out and was suprised that I barrelled downhilll locked-out.

    Skill level also factors in too. I was watching Jeff Jones ride and he is the master bike handler. Seems like there is nothing he can't tackle on a rigid. Me, I need the suspension to get me out of trouble.
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    As it has been stated in many threads, the bottom line is to do what suits you. I'm a techno-grouch-retro-geek cyclist and I'm happy with the negative trade offs that accompany a suspension fork in order to enjoy more comfort and if you wanna ride rigid, knock yerself out.
    I think you asked a fair question but you may have (unintentionally/intentionally) left the door wide open the zen-like comments that ensued. please dont ask for enlightenment in the 26 v. 29 schools.

    of course ride what you like and if your hands are numb or there is pain - something is wrong. I am no tinker, but i can do my share of a 24 or 8hr races full rigid. coupl'a reasons me thinks, better flow and a good setup.

    as for being more of a man? why yes i am, with every year. i have even grown the back hair and stuffed my shorts to prove it!
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    I've never suffered from wrist or hand pain because of a rigid fork.
    Other people in this thread have. I was addressing this comment to them.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    More of a man? You have to be a better bike handler to ride fast with a rigid fork. That's just a fact. If you pick the same lines with suspension, you aren't riding as hard. If you ride as hard, you better be doing it on worse lines, through more difficult terrain or much faster, or your suspension is just a crutch. Riding at your limit is riding at your limit. Technology may allow you to handle more with suspension than with rigid, but technology takes the credit for that. If someone on a rigid fork can hang with you on your suspension fork, he or she is a better rider.
    Again, others have implied that riding rigid increases the size of your cojones. I agree riding at your limit is riding at your limit. This supports my belief that you can ride just as hard with suspension as you can without. As for who's a better rider, if someone can ride faster than me on a rigid bike, good for them. I'm happy with my ability and I don't feel threatened by that.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    You asked the question. Why are you also delivering the lecture about riding what you want to ride?
    I'm not lecturing anybody. I'm engaged in a discussion with other mountain bikers about their personal preferences.

  45. #45
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    It takes more skill and courage to ride the same stretch of techinical terrain on a rigid bike at the same speed as on a suspension bike. The suspension user might have the same skill and courage, but he or she is not using it, all else being equal. If you are not riding faster or more techincal when you have suspension to take the physical and mental heat off of you, you are not riding as hard.

  46. #46
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    My bike is rigid because suspension forks don't fit my tires. Besides who needs suspension when you have 4" tires at 15psi.

    Actually I'd like to try a suspension fork but that would require a new fork, wheel, and tire, and that starts adding up.
    Craig

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogearshere
    I think you asked a fair question but you may have (unintentionally/intentionally) left the door wide open the zen-like comments that ensued.
    Knowing the reasons why people ride rigid will not answer his question. Understanding the reason why people ride rigid will.




  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenK
    Knowing the reasons why people ride rigid will not answer his question. Understanding the reason why people ride rigid will.



    i'm so dizzy.
    perception is reality.
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by holycromoly
    Riding rigid is part dependent on your local trails.

    ... and that "part" is smaller than you think.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogearshere
    i'm so dizzy.
    perception is reality.
    You are walking the right path now, grasshopper. Just remember, the path is as important as the destination.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenK
    You are walking the right path now, grasshopper. Just remember, the path is as important as the destination.
    what colour is my belt? i have white shoes and brown makes me look fat.
    i am installing barbed wire on my grips as we speak.
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  52. #52
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    The best thing to do is just give it a go, I did and I love it!

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogearshere
    what colour is my belt? i have white shoes and brown makes me look fat.
    i am installing barbed wire on my grips as we speak.
    Does brown really make you look fat, or is it all in your mind???

    I'd recommend you attach a battery and electrify the barbed wire. If you are gonna go, go all the way.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogearshere
    what colour is my belt? i have white shoes and brown makes me look fat.
    i am installing barbed wire on my grips as we speak.
    ha-hah, and your saddle?

  55. #55
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    I went to a ti rigid fork a couple of weeks ago. After now riding about 70-80 miles on it I have to say that it is great. I am only slightly slower than I was on the worst downhill sections. I keep up with my buddies for the most part on downhills, and I razz them for being on full suspension and not going any faster than a guy with no suspension other than my tires. Climbing with it is a joy.

    It does make me feel like I am more hardcore, pushing my limits. It does make the same old trails more fun. It does make my ride feel like it is a sportcar on the trail rather than an SUV.

    My Reba 29er fork will be going on sale very soon as I don't see much reason for it at this time.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I'm happy with the negative trade offs that accompany a suspension fork in order to enjoy more comfort and if you wanna ride rigid, knock yerself out.

    It's all about priorities. Some riders worship at the altar of light weight, some are nuts about reliability, some think that durability is kind, some cherish pure speed and performance, some search for the handling holy grail, and some, like you, prioritize comfort. It's all good.

    I think the he-man comments were by and large intended to be tongue-in-cheek.
    "America is the greatest country in the world, but that's a lot like being the prettiest waitress at Denny's."

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Law
    It does make me feel like I am more hardcore, pushing my limits. It does make the same old trails more fun. It does make my ride feel like it is a sportcar on the trail rather than an SUV.
    Ding ding ding!! Climbing with a sports car is a dream, but there are definitely some trails (mostly rocky downhills, especially when following a couple of my FS riding buddies) when I am glad I have the squishy fork on.

    Play to what lets you have the most fun. I like riding technical trails on a rigid fork, but I love hitting kickers and drops on a squish. Having choices is great.

  58. #58
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    in my very humble opinion, and i mean that sincerely, if you are doing a mix of urban and trails on your SS, then a rigid fork is just more fun. hammering down a sidewalk and off some low stairs, jumping curbs and ending up on some singletrack is just a blast!

    you feel like you accelerate quicker, and on hard smooth trails or pavement you really feel the efficiency of not having a big heavy fork, that may be bobbing a little as you go. and i would have to agree that you can pick and hold your lines through corners a little better without your fork diving a little.

    one more reason i like them is because on some of those slow small 1-2' drops where the ground might be a little cupped at the bottom, you never have to worry about your front tire sticking there for a second while your fork compresses and the back of your bike decides it want to be in the front for a while. I've had a few of those slow-motion endos on my dual-susp but not on a rigid.

    i know you had a rigid bike in the past but if you haven't ridden one lately then try one out (locking out your suspension doesn't count). i think you'll quicky remember some of the advantages that a rigid fork has. i'm not saying they're better--just different.

    sorry to ramble.....

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    ha-hah, and your saddle?
    Saddle? Alice!
    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenK
    Does brown really make you look fat, or is it all in your mind???

    I'd recommend you attach a battery and electrify the barbed wire. If you are gonna go, go all the way.
    and the hot hands would then bring us back full circle to the thread topic...nice touch.
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I don't understand the numb hands and sore wrists that accompany a rigid fork. Do you think your bike handling skills are better when you're numb & sore?
    Not everyone gets numb hands and sore wrists when they ride a rigid fork. Some people have smoother trails than others. And some people are just less susceptible to those things.

    One of my MTBs has a rigid fork, one has a suspension fork. The right choice depends entirely on the terrain. There are trails around here that are definitely better suited to suspension, and there are others that are just as well suited to rigid as to suspension. Horses for courses.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  61. #61
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    In the past...

    ...I thought riding a SS was pointless. Then I tried it and was hooked. Before this past winter I thought riding a rigid fork was just as silly and pointless. Then I tried it and was hooked.

    If you tried it and did not like it, good for you. You know the burn in your legs and lungs, the burn you get from pushing that 2:1 up a 10 minute wall? I wanted to feel that burn in my arms on the way down. Really though, it's pretty rare that my hands and arms feel any pain, and the pain they rarely do feel is good pain.

    I'm probably a bit faster going full rigid. My strong points are my bike handling skills and my upper body. Those 2 together make riding fully rigid fairly easy for me. On the other hand I don't have the strongest legs. They are my weakest link. Any way I can lighten my ride, and gain more power (loosing fork bob), makes me faster.

    Bike handling is much better on slow speed, rocky, technical trails.

    Want to get into rigid? Try trail building for a season or two. Swing a pick and axe for 2 hours 3 days a week. Your hands, wrists and arms will feel right at home on bars connected to a rigid fork.

  62. #62
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    I ride multiple bikes, but the reason my SS is a rigid bike is mainly because that is how it was set up when I bought it. The main benefit of it for me is that I bought the SS primarily for winter riding as I hated the amount of maintenance I had to do on my full suspension bike during those months. Every creaking pivot, every leaking seal, and every shifting problem was eliminated by going rigid SS. Personally, when I ride that bike the only thing I truly miss off my FS bike is it's disc brakes. I am currently in the process of upgrading my V-brakes to see if I can remedy it, but the worst problem I've had with it is in really rough, twisty terrain where I'm having to use the brakes a lot to control my speed, my wrists and hands get very tired. There are really only a few trails around here though that I can't rail on my rigid bike though.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by DukeSS
    Because I can
    ding ding ding ding.......we have a winner!
    It's only pain......

  64. #64
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    On my geared full suspension the nearby local trail didn't provide enough of a challenge anymore so I began riding my 26" front suspended hardtail which helped but before long I could easily clean all the rooty hills and effortlessly barrel down the technical sections as with my full suspension bike. The small jumps and drops were a joke. There wasn't much of a penalty for mistakes. The only challenge left was increasing lap times which is not my style. The neighborhood trail was becoming increasingly boring, forcing me to commute to more challenging trails which was getting old. When I switched to a rigid singlespeed (Monocog 29er) everything changed. I couldn't make it up all the hills and rocks and roots became major obstacles. On the rigid, 1.5 ft drops were like 5 on my full suspension or suspension fork hardtail. Mistakes come with a stiff penalty; literally. The challenge is back and with it the fun.
    Last edited by jkish; 06-23-2006 at 12:55 AM.
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  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike.
    Because any fork I would be willing to ride costs more than I paid for the bike?

  66. #66
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    I've just come back from my daily training ride, had an absolute blast launching the rigid off roots and into some more, just playing, taking notice at how much better the bike responds and corners with a rigid fork. Sure it hurts, but it's all part of the fun!

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nonracerrichie
    My rigid fork doesn't dive when I brake before a turn.

    There's no shock dive when you drop a ledge either.




    Ride rigid, and eat less dirt.
    aLaN AT BikeMojo DOT com

  68. #68
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    Think of it this way. The default bicycle is a rigid fixie. One adds options to suit their own comfort, performance and style needs. Some of us like to option out our rides with everything under the sun: gears, disks, front and rear shocks, computers, etc. Others like to keep it as simple as possible.

    For me, rigid SS follows this quote:
    "Perfection is achieved not when nothing more can be added, but when nothing more can be taken away." A. Saint Exupery

    For me, disks and coasting are in the "can't be taken away column".

    B

  69. #69
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    I like to experience both ends of the spectrum, geared FS and rigid SS. But I draw the line at rigid SS. A fixed biked would severely limit the terrain I like to ride (which is technical enough that it generally cannot be done fixed).

    And I do agree that the "hardcore" factor adds a nice touch and can stroke the ego. But after a few hours on the rigid SS, "hardcore" turns into plain hard and soon thereafter hard turns into why the heck am I doing this.

    Yes, for me rigid and SS are handicaps in most situations, especially when I race. So for me, the rigid SS is all about challenge and the freakish contrast it provides to my geared FS bike. I do love both bikes though.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
    RM Suzi Q 90 RSL
    KHS Team 29
    S-Works Roubaix
    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  70. #70
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    simplicity. nothing more nothing less.

    try it for a few weeks with good friends and a couple beers in your pack. if you still don't get it after that, you never will.

  71. #71
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    I too bought my first mtb before suspension was available and didn't get my first front shock until 2005. I like simplicity. That's why I ride fixed-gear on the street. I remember how terrible those early shocks were, too. elastomers. I like to wait and have the manufacturers figure things out a bit. I still like steel. You can usually take a steel bike anywhere in the world and have someone weld it back together if you screw it up. Try that with Al, Carbon, or Ti. Some of us like being technogrouches, too. I still like thumbies. I've gone with clipless, however. I use a brooks saddle. I still have 8-speed. On my fixed gear there's little I have to worry about going wrong. Of course, I can start off cheap, too. no cassette, other chainrings, front,rear der, no shocks, no brakes. When you don't have to worry about that, you can put all your money into the frame wheels and cranks.

  72. #72
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    More to the point, why not rigid?

    I'm still getting used to my rigid forks, but the more I ride the more fun I'm having remembering how much better the old days were (well ok they're better now disc brakes are around!), when people used one MTB for everything, you just rode for the sake of riding and having fun!

    Today I did my first drop using my rigid forks, not a big drop but it felt so sweet, I also did my first rigid rock garden, with a mixture of rocks mainly around the same size as footballs and I don't think I was any slower than what I'd be with a suspension fork!

    I love my bike, and I love my rigid fork!

  73. #73
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    I rode my cyclocross bike down a rocky, rutted singletrack with a rigid fork and drop bars with road brifters today.

    It's not the rigid fork that makes it tough, it's the drop bars and brake levers!

    On a mountain bike with flat or riser bars and mountain bike brake levers a rigid fork is not that big a deal.

    I like a rigid fork, now and then.

  74. #74
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    Everyday I put in riding my 92 rigid Stumpy, with flat pedals, I crank it up, ride hard, and keep it brutal. The bike will not die and its a blast to be able to make a killer climb

  75. #75
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    Just switched from a front suspension to a rigid front fork. The difference is amazing, the bike is SO much faster. Hill climbing is effortless and the bike keeps it's momentum so well. I do a lot of city biking and light well maintained trails, where I absolutely don't need a fork, heavy trails are tougher but definitely doable. I just have to watch my line much closer and hold on to the handlebars tighter. If I moved to Colorado I'd probably put a suspension fork on it, but I really don't need it here in Texas.

    Besides I'm sick of watching all the yuppies in the bike shops dishing out heavy money for all these fancy bikes they don't need. I like keeping it simple and passing them up on a bike that costs a quarter of their's.

    Ligher and faster, much faster.

  76. #76
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    Rigid is as rigid does.
    My tapeworm tells me what to do.

  77. #77
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    If you want to be cool, ride rigid. In all seriousness, I have another bike that isn't fully rigid, I just like the rigid SS for a change. The biggest thing you will notice is handling. There is NO suspension fork that handles like a rigid fork. My bike handles like it is on rails. I have a Tange rigid fork, costs $50, and like one person said, it's still lighter than a SID World Cup. Just try it. It's not as rough as you think it will be! If you want the ultimate in rigid forks, check out the DMR trailblade. I got a little turned on just thinking about how it handles!

    www.cycletofitness.com It's only a super-awesome website for a super-awesome store. Just click it. I dare you.

  78. #78
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    I have never noticed that a rigid fork steers with better 'precision'. Even compared to the SID on my old bike. I know that the SID flexes more, but when I'm bouncing down some rocky singletrack I can't tell. My bike usually goes where I want it to, regarless of what fork is up front, and if it doesn't it was probably user error. I do think you can notice the weight difference, though. I don't have any wrist trouble, but my local trails are not very technical. Certainly I am faster on rocky downhills with sus up front, but I'm willing to give that up. If the terrain was different, I might not be so willing.

    Just like most everyone else, I like the simplicity of SS, and that carries over to the fork. Changing seals and oil is not that big a deal considering you don't have to do it very often, but it's better not to have to do it at all. You will probably never have to replace your rigid fork, it will work forever because it doesn't wear out. What it comes down to, I think, is that there is really only one reason to NOT ride rigid, and that's if riding with suspension makes it more fun. For me, for now, it does not.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by crx7
    If I moved to Colorado I'd probably put a suspension fork on it, but I really don't need it here in Texas.

    .
    Well unfortunately Colorado's full, but you can ride rigid here successfully.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
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  80. #80
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    Just yesterday I went for a ride on a SS with a suspension fork for the first time in about 6 months. It was fun. Living in PA's Appalachians subjects you to rockier than average trails to say the least. The fork was a R7 with spv jacked up pretty high. A great match for a SS. It's a bike I'm building up to sell. The fork allowed me to be a lot less attentive to what I was riding over. Clearly the rough downhills were easier. However, after a few miles of riding my arms and upper body were saying, "When are we getting started", and my legs legs were saying, "something's not right, hammering the climbs isn't quite as easy as usual." Cornering on the squish vs. rigid was a wash. Hitting the smooth corners on the rigid (Walt Works) was clearly better but on rougher terrain the susupension stuck the corners better. The R7s a pretty stiff fork for it's weight. At the end of the ride I pulled out the fully rigid to get a back-to-back comparison. After only a few hundred yards (BTW the trail starts from shed in my yard which is adjacent to State Forrest Land, I'm spoiled) it was obvious that I was having much more fun on the rigid. A rigid forces you to use your whole body when riding, not just your legs, I like that. There is a time and place for the suspension fork. When I go out with some off my friends who ride more all mountain the suspension fork would be nicer, but for all around riding I'll take fully rigid.

    As a side note... the two bikes above are about the same weight except for the extra pound the sus fork adds. The rigid helps my not so strong legs but shifting some of the burden to my stronger upper body. I'm pushing a 34:16 on the rigid and a 32:17 on the squish. The rigid is faster, and more fun.

    Mike

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J
    However, after a few miles of riding my arms and upper body were saying, "When are we getting started", and my legs legs were saying, "something's not right, hammering the climbs isn't quite as easy as usual."
    The rigid helps my not so strong legs but shifting some of the burden to my stronger upper body. I'm pushing a 34:16 on the rigid and a 32:17 on the squish. The rigid is faster, and more fun.

    Mike
    I'll add one more benefit in regards to upper body, I've started doing some limited weight lifting just cause I'm riding rigid these days. Now pushing me into weight lifting (a bit) may not seem like a advantage to you but hell, I honestly wouldn't be doing it unless I was riding the rigid. Now my whole body feels stronger and I can dam sure feel the benefits while riding. My wife digs it too. At any rate, I have two rigid SS and a front sprung SS. I rode the sprung SS once this year (out of 71 SS rides as of last night) and couldn't get over how awkward it felt to me... my 2 cents.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
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    We just ride...

  82. #82
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    The joy of pain

    A typical week for me is weight lifting 3 times a week and riding my rigid Stumpjumper 6 times a week (sometimes more!) I notice that I practically use every muscle in my upper body to control the bike. Not to mention the fact that a rigid demands constant use of your brain and micro-muscle groups. My bike is not an SS, and I don't think I'll convert it to one. Up hills I'll run big ring and little ring, out of the saddle, with lactic acid spilling forth from my ears! You can cram a 2 hour workout into 1 hour if you aren't afraid of a little pain

  83. #83
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    Cool-blue Rhythm I can speak from experience (lots and lots of experience)

    there aint notin' magical 'bout riding rigid. I did it from 1981 to 2001 exclusively. Read my first telescopic fork was a 2002 Marz xfly 100. Rigid makes you pick better lines, there is no secreat about that fact pattern. However, telescopic forks allow you to allow plow through 12" ruts without thinking, and this is key. At my age and ability this is important. I used to be with the rigid exclusively crowd, but expeience has taught me telesopic forks definetly has there place.

    VTW

  84. #84
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    had a pace rc32, but it wasnt as much fun rigid. It was easier to climb, but you had to hang on for your life on trails, and suspensions eats it up for you. I like the susension, and if you think its too heavy, go to the gym

  85. #85
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    Actually rigid can be a lot of fun and is the best way to hone some skills, if you've only been riding for 2 years I'd seriously suggest spending some time on a rigid bike, it'll do anyone good. Of course suspension is still fun in a different way and the weight is certainly not an issue for me, being 240lbs, weight training, bag work and riding 6 times a week!

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDEnvEngr
    Think of it this way. The default bicycle is a rigid fixie. One adds options to suit their own comfort, performance and style needs. Some of us like to option out our rides with everything under the sun: gears, disks, front and rear shocks, computers, etc. Others like to keep it as simple as possible.

    For me, rigid SS follows this quote:
    "Perfection is achieved not when nothing more can be added, but when nothing more can be taken away." A. Saint Exupery

    For me, disks and coasting are in the "can't be taken away column".

    B
    I think this quote essplains it real nice like.
    eh?

  87. #87
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    Simple Stumpjumper

    No one hands out medals for riding a rigid bike. But a rigid bike may help you win medals another time.
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  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
    i guess people like to abuse their bodies, so that when they are 40 their knees and other joints are shot, and they become daily pill poppers just to stay active. sure sounds like a blast to me...

  89. #89
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    Get a life Sally!

    Quote Originally Posted by salimoneus
    i guess people like to abuse their bodies, so that when they are 40 their knees and other joints are shot, and they become daily pill poppers just to stay active. sure sounds like a blast to me...
    Why do you insist on spreading your negativity in the SS forum? L A M E

    But, I bet you're a real gas to hang out with in person........Hahahahahahaha

    Anyhow...

    One really nice thing about rigid is no wasted energy to bob when your out of the saddle.

    I just rode one of my old bikes with a sus fork today, first time in about 9 months on a sus fork. It was a bit strange. Yeah, it smoothed the trail out a little bit, but all the bobbing and diving didn't make it worthwhile to me, by any means. Rigid forces you to ride smoother by utilizing (or developing) your handling skills and learning to pick the best lines and stay on them. And the agility and responsiveness (not to mention weight) of a rigid fork can't be matched by any sus fork. And, it's maintanance-free.

    As has been stated, it's wherein your priorities lie. If want the most plush ride that will roll over trail features the most comfortably, probably a sus fork is best (or a road bike and some nice smooth asphalt )

    But if you want (pick as many as are applicable) light, responsive, efficient, agile, no maintainance and further devopment of your skills, think about going rigid.

  90. #90
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    Upset Sal

    Quote Originally Posted by long hazy daze
    Why do you insist on spreading your negativity in the SS forum? L A M E

    But, I bet you're a real gas to hang out with in person........Hahahahahahaha
    Just ignore him, eventually he'll go away, SAD ACT.

    I dislike people like that so much, people that use forums to show everyone how clever they are NOT!

  91. #91
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    I was asked that question while riding with a bunch of geared folks through a rocky section of trail. I didn't answer the question, they saw the answer.
    I'm a bike geek, nature freak, whatever...

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by long hazy daze
    Why do you insist on spreading your negativity in the SS forum? L A M E
    ...
    i dont see it as negativity, i see it as realism. maybe a little blunt and unfiltered, but realism nonetheless.

    i'm just stating the obvious here. the fact is that a rigid trail bike is WAY harder on your joints, and does do damage whether you want to admit it or not. i guess some people like to think about long term effects and consequences. with a name like "long hazy daze" i'm pretty sure your mind is free of those types of thoughts though

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by djcweed
    I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
    I'll add one more reason to the list of lighter, more precise, no dive, simple, etc.

    Because the fork matches the color of my frame.

    If anyone is contantly suffering numbness or sore wrists they should evaluate their positon on the bike. Weight, wrist rotation, arm bend, brake lever position, etc.

    As for that poster whose name shall not be mentioned, some stress is necessary to maintain bone density

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by salimoneus
    i dont see it as negativity, i see it as realism. maybe a little blunt and unfiltered, but realism nonetheless.

    i'm just stating the obvious here. the fact is that a rigid trail bike is WAY harder on your joints, and does do damage whether you want to admit it or not. i guess some people like to think about long term effects and consequences. with a name like "long hazy daze" i'm pretty sure your mind is free of those types of thoughts though
    Got any research or scientific data to back up this "fact" , Dr. Sally?
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    Last edited by long hazy daze; 08-15-2006 at 12:05 PM.

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by long hazy daze
    .....
    excuse me hazy...you miss the sign post?
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    BECAUSE I SAID SO

  96. #96
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    I choose to ride a rigid singlespeed for the same reason i got into bikes in the first place,simplicity.Full suspension bikes with oil floating around inside parts with valves and god knows what else - can hardly be described as simple, can they? Bikes are getting too high tec for my liking and they do not suit my 'just get on and ride' philosophy.

  97. #97
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    when you ride with a rigid fork, your body is the "suspension"....you will need to "flow" with the trail.........hence when you ride a FS.....your bike flows & your body becomes rigid( this part is just my assumatiom because I dun have experience with FS bikes).

    just to add....it is the "flow" that gives you the "feel".
    in fact, after many years of cycling, I tried a front suspension for the first time last week.
    I don' t think I like it.
    Finally, suspension fork are too $$$$.

  98. #98
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jugdish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,266
    Just because it's soo much fun to listen to the insecure explain why riding rigid isn't for them.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

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