Why is my geared 26" harder to ride than my SS 29er?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542

    Why is my geared 26" harder to ride than my SS 29er?

    I took my 23lb. geared 26" HT out today and again, as before, I was huffing and puffing compared to my single speed 29'er, which is not only one gear, but 4 lbs. heavier.

    I just don't get it.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    I took my 23lb. geared 26" HT out today and again, as before, I was huffing and puffing compared to my single speed 29'er, which is not only one gear, but 4 lbs. heavier.

    I just don't get it.

    You're not very good at selecting gears? :^)

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Quote Originally Posted by moondawg14
    You're not very good at selecting gears? :^)
    Heh heh. No... I've been a weightlifter for 18 years, competetive for a few of of those years, and I'm thinking my anaerobic strength is better than my aerobic... or something weird.

    I'm stronger standing up and cranking than spinning. Add the efficiency of a direct drive train and it's even easier for me.

    IDK... does anybody else feel like this?

  4. #4
    Old Fart
    Reputation: Kwahe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    Heh heh. No... I've been a weightlifter for 18 years, competetive for a few of of those years, and I'm thinking my anaerobic strength is better than my aerobic... or something weird.

    I'm stronger standing up and cranking than spinning. Add the efficiency of a direct drive train and it's even easier for me.

    IDK... does anybody else feel like this?

    I definitely feel like that. I never enjoyed trying to shift my way through variable terrain. And no, I never did manage to learn to shift effectively, mainly because I couldn't enjoy riding while calculating the shift, so I didn't ride much, and therefore didn't learn. Now on my SS 29er I don't worry about the shift. I just ride, and love every second of it. Float over stuff, up, down, feather the brake, pedal....so easy.....well, except for the physical effort. But I ride for its conditioning benefits, too. Win-win for me.
    Misfit DiSSent

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Quote Originally Posted by Kwahe
    I definitely feel like that. I never enjoyed trying to shift my way through variable terrain. And no, I never did manage to learn to shift effectively, mainly because I couldn't enjoy riding while calculating the shift, so I didn't ride much, and therefore didn't learn. Now on my SS 29er I don't worry about the shift. I just ride, and love every second of it. Float over stuff, up, down, feather the brake, pedal....so easy.....well, except for the physical effort. But I ride for its conditioning benefits, too. Win-win for me.
    Yeah, and I'll add... I've said it before and I'll say it again... I grew up freestyle BMX'ing, and I LIVED on my bike. We would ride to spots clear across town and we climbed like goats up everything. I didn't realize it until recently the caliber of hill climbing we did as kids... it was just stand up and grunt up. We didn't even think about it like that - we just were so focused on getting to the wallride, loading dock, skatepark, etc.

    Maybe it's a little muscle memory.

  6. #6
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,631
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    I took my 23lb. geared 26" HT out today and again, as before, I was huffing and puffing compared to my single speed 29'er, which is not only one gear, but 4 lbs. heavier.

    I just don't get it.
    you're spinning too fast...my guess anyhoo....

    for climbing Stiles trail (kinda technical...sorta) i'd simply pick an easy gear (32X?)...relax....and take it mellow....

    switching from SS to gears is weird....just like going rigid to full squish to 'cross....takes a little getting used to..

    my .02

    PS - one of these days I'm gonna run into you at Santa Teresa
    Click Here for Forum Rules

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    16
    Yea, I've been trying to figure out what it is about a SS 29er rigid that I like so much. I seem to do better and prefer standing, which the rigid rewards with good forward progress. One thing I did narrow down when riding a FS and SS rigid back to back is I really like the stiffness of the rigid. The FS felt like a noodle, making for a more nervous ride. Other than that rigidity, I can't quite figure it out. People mention not having to think about shifting but I don't that is it, shifting comes naturally and starts to be done by the subconscious anyway.

  8. #8
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,667
    That's an easy one. Your mind can't psyche you into downshifting on your SS. I've noticed that I downshift in places on my geared bike that I pull through no problem on the SS and It's not because I can pull through it the same on the geared bike.

    Also I stay seated way more on my geared bike, there again it's not because I have too.
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ktm520's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,588
    I've got a monocog 29er and my buddy has a Trek Al hardtail 26er. On a recent ride, we switched back and forth a couple of times. We were both amazed at how much faster we were on the monocog, and my buddy isn't a super strong rider. He said it took a lot more energy to ride the 26er, and I agreed.

    A little bit of setup involved, like he had way too much air in his tires and fork, but I don't think it would have bridged the gap.

    Then, a week later, I pulled my Yeti 575 off the wall (hadn't been rode in 6 months) and was just as fast on it as my ss, probably a little faster since I wasn't gear limited on some of the faster sections. I was really perplexed after riding the 575 since I had always assumed that hardtails are much more efficient than fs bikes. Especially since the 575 is way overkill for the trails I was riding. Maybe the 575 is just that good . . .

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,431
    I'm not surprised that the 575 is quick.....every time I ride mine I get reminded (especially since the push shock tune). They are remarkably efficient and get quicker as the trail gets rougher.
    long live Yetis
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    Heh heh. No... I've been a weightlifter for 18 years, competetive for a few of of those years, and I'm thinking my anaerobic strength is better than my aerobic... or something weird.

    I'm stronger standing up and cranking than spinning. Add the efficiency of a direct drive train and it's even easier for me.

    IDK... does anybody else feel like this?
    I hear ya man. I am also a competitive weightlifter (6'0'' 245, 12 %BF) and I just for a MC 9er. After my first lap at the local trail I was amazed at how much easier the MC is as opposed to my squishy 6er. I have also been doing a ton of back squats and zercher squats which might help a bit.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    Heh heh. No... I've been a weightlifter for 18 years, competetive for a few of of those years, and I'm thinking my anaerobic strength is better than my aerobic... or something weird.

    I'm stronger standing up and cranking than spinning. Add the efficiency of a direct drive train and it's even easier for me.

    IDK... does anybody else feel like this?
    I hear ya man. I am also a competitive weightlifter (6'0'' 245, 12 %BF) and I just picked up a MC 9er. After my first lap at the local trail I was amazed at how much easier the MC is as opposed to my squishy 6er. I have also been doing a ton of back squats and zercher squats which might help a bit.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,438

    You're not stronger....

    you're the same person....

    I think it's more comfort with the riding style of SS...masher vs spinner on climbs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    Heh heh. No... I've been a weightlifter for 18 years, competetive for a few of of those years, and I'm thinking my anaerobic strength is better than my aerobic... or something weird.

    I'm stronger standing up and cranking than spinning. Add the efficiency of a direct drive train and it's even easier for me.

    IDK... does anybody else feel like this?
    Happy new year..Stuff $: Eno 29wheel (non disc), Yakima, 2 steelheads, with towers for Volvo luggage rails.

  14. #14
    Rocket Boy
    Reputation: Arby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    272
    Quote Originally Posted by Kwahe
    I definitely feel like that. I never enjoyed trying to shift my way through variable terrain. And no, I never did manage to learn to shift effectively, mainly because I couldn't enjoy riding while calculating the shift, so I didn't ride much, and therefore didn't learn. .
    I can't relate to this at all. I ride a SS all the time but also have a geared bike. In all my years of riding geared mtb's I never had any trouble gauging when/how to shift for the varying terrain. Do people really have a hard time finding a conmfy gear and preparing for climbs and decents?

    Arby

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rob.char's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    360
    Hmm, I went for a ride on my SS 26 hardtail yesterday and I felt like I was fighting myself the entire time. I have heard that the 29er just carries momentum and is tons easier SS wise. I think about the gear thing... You contemplate, do I pound up this hill or spin up it, and when you're on the SS you don't have a choice. Which is good.
    Mary ss shenanigans

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Flat Ark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,646
    I love riding SS but I find it to be a "lazy man's" bike for just general trail riding. I find riding SS to be more relaxed and easier 90% of the time when compared to riding geared (at least in my region). Seated on a geared bike you are using pretty much all leg/core power. On a SS you get to use a lot of your body weight while standing to push/ride the cranks over. For me that equals rest(less oxygen consumption) and I get the added benefit of speed just from pushing a larger gear. I honestly think that at an average pace you can potentially go faster on a SS even if you are somewhat lacking in cardio fitness because the nature of it allows you to be somewhat lazy with your cadence. Just my personal take on it.

    Racing SS however is a whole different ballgame. You have to HAMMER/SPRINT up those hills and still keep those rpm's up on the flats. That is really hard work!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.