what does this mean?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    what does this mean?

    i keep seeing this phrase in adds what does it mean? "fixed wheel with flip flop hub one side single speed non-fixed other fixed"

  2. #2
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    both sides of the wheel are threaded to take a) SS freewheel, or b) fixed cog...

    not sure if one side has the double 'reverse' thread for the fixed though so a lockring actually locks on the cog (i've learned that loctite WILL come loose...ugh)......
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  3. #3
    trail rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by flynngabriel
    i keep seeing this phrase in adds what does it mean? "fixed wheel with flip flop hub one side single speed non-fixed other fixed"
    The hub has a regular threaded side for a freewheel and the other side is double threaded, the outer is left hand thread for a lock ring.



    Fixed cog and lockring threads on the left, freewheel threads on the right.
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  4. #4
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    These hubs are meant for road/track bikes. I would shy away from one for use on a mtn bike.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  5. #5
    luddite
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsquared28
    These hubs are meant for road/track bikes. I would shy away from one for use on a mtn bike.
    Not true of the Surly.
    Or a Pauls
    Or, or, or...

  6. #6
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    So if you mount a cog on one side of the hub you can coast (like normal folks do) and if you put the cog on the other side you have a fixie (like cloth cap wearing cafe poser trendoid sheep do).

    For me Fixie + Dirt = Suicide. some folks can, but most folks shouldn't. Actually that applies equally to fixies on the road some would argue...

  7. #7
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    No... if you put a freewheel on the freewheel threads you can coast. If you mount a fixed cog on the fixed threads WITH the reverse thread lockring (the smaller threads) then it's a fixed gear.

    Also, fixed off road really isn't that bad. In fact, It's pretty fun. A rim brake helps if you're using a flip/flop.

  8. #8
    trail rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullrange Drew
    For me Fixie + Dirt = Suicide. some folks can, but most folks shouldn't.
    Hmmmmm. You are "Fullrange" Drew, but you are so short sighted about what you do not know.

    Many of us find fixed MTB fun and it will teach you many bike handling skills that are very useful for all riding. And it is fun.....

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  9. #9
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    just got back from a fixed gear mtn ride. It started raining just as we hit the top. it was a 4 mile downhill tech back to the car. I run dual bb7s and my buddy has a dual bb5s but his bike is a normal ss mtn bike. when our brakes stop working he was screwed bad, but mine were so-so, plus speed can be controlled on the fixed. but otherwise- when people ask me what the fixed advantages are i tell them the only advantage is that the whole thing is a disadvantage making every other bike seem way easier.

    FYI: on the flip flop hub you can actually run freewheels on both sides. so if fixed isnt your thing maybe having two different gear ratios is.
    no chain no gain.

  10. #10
    V-Shaped Rut
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    FYI: on the flip flop hub you can actually run freewheels on both sides. so if fixed isnt your thing maybe having two different gear ratios is.
    But if you're taking the wheel off and swapping chains/links/re-tensioning anyway its trivial to swap cogs. Why have the extra weight?

    I would think the real thing that would be cool is fixed with a tiny cog for a street ride to the trailhead, then swap to freewheel and a mountain cog for the trail. Course you'd need something like 2 powerlinks and a length of chain to add the extra links (or sliders) but its not that big a deal.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_slacker
    But if you're taking the wheel off and swapping chains/links/re-tensioning anyway its trivial to swap cogs.

    But lets say you are running standard vertical dropouts with a tensioner, (which plenty of people do) in that event you might even have a quick release hub. A swich at the top of the trail would take under a minute.

    also sheldon brown points out that the flip fllop has the fw-fw configuration. and thats where i first thought, yeah if the threads are the same why not?

    aside from that the main advantage of the flip flop is the versatility of a single rear wheel. i doubt i would run one because i love dual disc brakes.
    no chain no gain.

  12. #12
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    10 speed, what hub are you using to get dual discs AND fixed? im assuming its not cheap
    I ONLY make weird noises when i ride SS

  13. #13
    V-Shaped Rut
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    True on both the pro and con. I think it would be cool to have even a 2 tooth difference for easier or harder trails. 32/16 for rolling hills and 32/18 for steeper stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    But lets say you are running standard vertical dropouts with a tensioner, (which plenty of people do) in that event you might even have a quick release hub. A swich at the top of the trail would take under a minute.

    also sheldon brown points out that the flip fllop has the fw-fw configuration. and thats where i first thought, yeah if the threads are the same why not?

    aside from that the main advantage of the flip flop is the versatility of a single rear wheel. i doubt i would run one because i love dual disc brakes.

  14. #14
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    Dingle setup with a disc on one side?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiDaDunlop
    Dingle setup with a disc on one side?
    but...but...a dingle is not a single.....
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by myself369
    10 speed, what hub are you using to get dual discs AND fixed? im assuming its not cheap

    Actually... I am simply running a shimano xt rear hub. I bought the surly fixxer and installed it in place of the freehub body. It was easy to do and works perfect. But as I understand Surly now sells a hub that is fixed-disc. But I could not wait around for that since I set mine up last year.

    So any 8-9 speed rear disc hub with the surly fixxer should get you there.

    I know lots of fixed mtn guys run only front brake or no brake, but I live in colorado and I like having control. It is really nice to lock up the brake with pedals at 12 and 6 o'clock to skid through weird tech stuff. Try doing it brakeless, no thanks.
    no chain no gain.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_slacker
    True on both the pro and con. I think it would be cool to have even a 2 tooth difference for easier or harder trails. 32/16 for rolling hills and 32/18 for steeper stuff.
    Exactly! It is a easy cheap way to run dingle without buying expensive weird freewheels and chainrings. a spring style tensioner will easily accommodate a change of 2-4 teeth witch is a huge difference. But again, no disc brake.
    no chain no gain.

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