What bars for fixie road commuter bike?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What bars for fixie road commuter bike?

    I have an old Trek road bike set up as a 40/15 fixed gear to commute on. It currently just has the stock drop bars which are all fine and good but I feel like I cannot generate enough torque from the bars to climb really steep stuff and it just feels awkward. I do like the drop bars for long distances and want to ride this bike on some six hour rides this coming spring...

    so what bars should I use I can generate some torque with? I am open to all the Sparrow and Surly type bars, I guess i could just use a longer stem to get some reach. Thoughts here?

  2. #2
    Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny K
    I have an old Trek road bike set up as a 40/15 fixed gear to commute on. It currently just has the stock drop bars which are all fine and good but I feel like I cannot generate enough torque from the bars to climb really steep stuff and it just feels awkward. I do like the drop bars for long distances and want to ride this bike on some six hour rides this coming spring...

    so what bars should I use I can generate some torque with? I am open to all the Sparrow and Surly type bars, I guess i could just use a longer stem to get some reach. Thoughts here?
    First, lets' assume you have a quill type stem (depends how "old" your Trek is) making it easier to raise you bar height. I would stay with a drop bar, but raise the bar higher so it is more comfortable You can also go with a wider bar; say 46cm. If you want more check out the Nitto Mustache bar. Here's that bar on my tandem; I've used it for a couple of years, but I'm going to have to go back to drop bar because of some wrist issues.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What bars for fixie road commuter bike?-img_0013%5B1%5D.jpg  

    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  3. #3
    is buachail foighneach me
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    You CAN run mtb bars on your fixie, with the correct stem. like wide risers? run wide risers. add barends if you want.

    If you want to generate alot of torque on drop bars, get in the drops. It's uncomfortable(for me anyway) but really amazing how much more power I seem to be able to put through the pedals. I would just run mtb bars on it though.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    Bullhorns work very well for climbing and braking torque on a fixed gear.

  6. #6
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    I run riser bars on a Kona Paddy Wagon with Ergons. I tend to prefer the mountain bike position of the road bar. Works for me and yes I had to change the stem. Weird bike. Brakeless fixie with panniers, rack and full lighting system. Under cover hipster!

  7. #7
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    Ok, I measured some stuff earlier and it looks like with a 120mm stem I can match the cockpit on this bike to that of my Inbred 29er. Planning on doing a wide flat bar with some Ergons and oooooold Specialized Dirt Rodz barends...

    and yes, they are ano purple.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Bullhorns work very well for climbing and braking torque on a fixed gear.
    Nashbar makes a good cheap bar. Love mine on my road fixie.
    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...1_10000_201514

  9. #9
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    the narrowest ones you can find. 12" at the most.

  10. #10
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    Are you running brakeless with no levers? I always run a front brake and a dummy lever on the right and it's just like on any road bike. If you're really torquing to get up hills you might want to get a 16 or 17 cog. I've ridden a fixed-gear in the PacNW for 20 years and see folks all the time trying to run too big a gear. Fixie riding is about spinning, not pushing.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by themanmonkey
    Are you running brakeless with no levers? I always run a front brake and a dummy lever on the right and it's just like on any road bike. If you're really torquing to get up hills you might want to get a 16 or 17 cog. I've ridden a fixed-gear in the PacNW for 20 years and see folks all the time trying to run too big a gear. Fixie riding is about spinning, not pushing.
    I upped my gearing because flats and downhills were too slow. While not terribly original, the standard 70 gear inch target works great for me.

  12. #12
    bmw
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    I tried a few setups and settled on wide (for a road bike) bull horns on my fixed gear road bike. I think they are Profile Design.

  13. #13
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Seventy gear inches is perfect.

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