Trek 69er BB Blew out AGAIN, what crank set?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Trek 69er BB Blew out AGAIN, what crank set?

    The bike shop is going to warranty it again, instead they want to change the crankset and use an external bb. They are reccomending a truvativ stylo set. Is this better then the crap isis setup that came stock on the bike? Or am I going backwards?

  2. #2
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    An external BB won't necessarily last any longer, although you can probably get better life out of them if you remove the covers and seals and add fresh grease every few months. My last two FSA's have only lasted ~ 6 months each.

    A higher-quality ISIS BB is probably cheaper than an entire new crankset and should last much longer than the cheap stock ones. I don't know ISIS BB's too well, but I believe you can get one with much tougher bearings and better seals for ~$50-60

  3. #3
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    These are lasting about a week to two weeks, and then the bike sits in the bike shop for a week getting fixed

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Efff
    These are lasting about a week to two weeks, and then the bike sits in the bike shop for a week getting fixed
    Yikes. That's ridiculous!

    The feedback that I've heard on this forum about the high-quality ISIS BBs has been in the order of years of problem-free service

  5. #5
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    square taper cranks (middleburn or eno) and a phil wood BB......last for-freaking-ever.....no chit
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  6. #6
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    If the shop wants to give you an X-Type crank, I'd take it.

    ISIS BB's use smaller (weaker) bearings...hence the change to bigger X-Type BB.
    I got 1 year out of my Truvativ BB. I only got 6 months out of my RaceFace Isis.

    notice the bigger diameter spindle on the isis bb,
    that means even less room for the bearings.
    Last edited by Hollis; 06-11-2009 at 02:19 PM.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollis
    If the shop wants to give you an X-Type crank, I'd take it.

    ISIS BB's use smaller (weaker) bearings...hence the change to bigger X-Type BB.
    I got 1 year out of my Truvativ BB. I only got 6 months out of my RaceFace Isis.
    Very valid point about the bearing size, although the trade off seems to be poor sealing. Also, I do remember reading that the tougher ISIS designs use multiple rows of bearings and even roller bearings to spread out the load

    I was offering the suggestion of a better ISIS BB as a potentially cheaper alternative solution. Some people do prefer the external bearing cranks and I can't argue with that.

  8. #8
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    riding conditions?

    Quote Originally Posted by Efff
    These are lasting about a week to two weeks, and then the bike sits in the bike shop for a week getting fixed
    Are you riding exclusively under water trails with scuba gear? Any BB should last more than a few weeks unless the conditions are off the chart,,,,,,,maybe the shop is installing the BB setup incorrrectly? Something's not jiving, i smell a rat Where do you live?

  9. #9
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    The bike shop seems to be pretty set on going with the external bb, which I have no objection to if it is 'better' as they say it is. Thanks for the advice

  10. #10
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    Square tapers, Middleburns





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  11. #11
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    external king with a shimano crank. its the only answer.

  12. #12
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    If they are going to warranty it, you could ask politely of course for a credit towards a crankset of your choice. "thefuzzbl" and "RSW42" both have valid agreeable suggestions.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by illnacord
    If they are going to warranty it, you could ask politely of course for a credit towards a crankset of your choice. "thefuzzbl" and "RSW42" both have valid agreeable suggestions.
    So you are saying the one they are offering as a replacement is not good, correct?

  14. #14
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    Look at the Stylo OCT cranks in 1.1 (SS) or 3.3. Your shop can get those and they use a beefy external bottom bracket.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Efff
    So you are saying the one they are offering as a replacement is not good, correct?
    they are NOT ADDRESSING THE PROBLEM. there is an issue with the facing on the BB shell (and / or alignment of BB shell in frame)....there is no other way that ANY BB will go south after 2 weeks other than badly uneven preload on the bearings. (or riding underwater as the other poster mentioned...)

    seriously though if you are honestly trashing a BB every 2 weeks then it IS NOT the BB at fault. get the shop to do their job properly, please!
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollis
    If the shop wants to give you an X-Type crank, I'd take it.

    ISIS BB's use smaller (weaker) bearings...hence the change to bigger X-Type BB.
    I got 1 year out of my Truvativ BB. I only got 6 months out of my RaceFace Isis.

    notice the bigger diameter spindle on the isis bb,
    that means even less room for the bearings.
    wow for me it was opposite. I got 3 weeks out of truvativ xtype and still running 11/2year old ISIS FSA.

  17. #17
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    if you want REALLY strong ISIS get them to throw on a Truvativ Howitzer. Yeah its heavy but its designed for DH and its bombproof.
    If you blow this one, then its your frame for sure.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollis
    If the shop wants to give you an X-Type crank, I'd take it.

    ISIS BB's use smaller (weaker) bearings...hence the change to bigger X-Type BB.
    I got 1 year out of my Truvativ BB. I only got 6 months out of my RaceFace Isis.

    notice the bigger diameter spindle on the isis bb,
    that means even less room for the bearings.

    Not to be really pedantic, but you haven't pictured a ISIS in your pic. You have pictured a Shimano Octo-link in reality. The ISIS was a reaction to Shimano's patent and pay-to-play policy on the Octo-link.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by themanmonkey
    Not to be really pedantic, but you haven't pictured a ISIS in your pic. You have pictured a Shimano Octo-link in reality. The ISIS was a reaction to Shimano's patent and pay-to-play policy on the Octo-link.
    yeah and the octalink is far superior to ISIS.

  20. #20
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    It's an SS. External BB is the ticket. Big bearings, set wide to eliminate spindle flex and ya jus' screw the damn things in and go ride it.

    Let us know what you go with, bud!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    they are NOT ADDRESSING THE PROBLEM. there is an issue with the facing on the BB shell (and / or alignment of BB shell in frame)....there is no other way that ANY BB will go south after 2 weeks other than badly uneven preload on the bearings. (or riding underwater as the other poster mentioned...)

    seriously though if you are honestly trashing a BB every 2 weeks then it IS NOT the BB at fault. get the shop to do their job properly, please!
    See, I thought especially after this most recent ( 3rd ) bb got shredded to pieces I was thinking the actual BB case ( frame ) is bad. Nobody at the bike shop seems to agree with me, so I tried calling trek to get a 2nd opinion and the rep on the phone had the same idea with another crank and external bb. What else can I do?

    They called earlier today to notify me that they have the new parts now and it will be ready for pick up later this evening. I'm thinking I'll ride it with the new setup till this one fails, then try and have the frame replaced? I really don't know which road to take.

    Thanks for all the crank / bb suggestions, the bike shop doesn't really want to use anything other then the one I mentioned earlier for some reason or another.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Efff
    See, I thought especially after this most recent ( 3rd ) bb got shredded to pieces I was thinking the actual BB case ( frame ) is bad. Nobody at the bike shop seems to agree with me, so I tried calling trek to get a 2nd opinion and the rep on the phone had the same idea with another crank and external bb. What else can I do?

    They called earlier today to notify me that they have the new parts now and it will be ready for pick up later this evening. I'm thinking I'll ride it with the new setup till this one fails, then try and have the frame replaced? I really don't know which road to take.

    Thanks for all the crank / bb suggestions, the bike shop doesn't really want to use anything other then the one I mentioned earlier for some reason or another.
    get them to show you the BB interface when they take it off... make sure it is flat and smooth everywhere. Then when they install the BB they obviously will put the drive side in first, and then the secondary cup on the non driveside. IF that secondary cup is hard to thread in, then there is a serious issue with the frame. Just make sure you are there and tell them you want to see whats going on .

  23. #23
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    Square Taper.

    Never an issue.

    As someone who works on bikes, externals make me cry.

    I put em up there with 31.8 bars and stems as unfixing something that always worked to begin with.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM
    square taper cranks (middleburn or eno) and a phil wood BB......last for-freaking-ever.....no chit
    What he said! Both my bikes are square taper. I've never had to replace a BB...ever! One's at least 8 years old now; I keep hoping it'll wear out so I can replace it with a Phil Wood, but it isnt happening (it's a Shimano UN72). The other is a cheapo Shimano UN52, but it's in a new bike. When that goes, in goes a Phil Wood. I think all these new fangled systems are a solution looking for a problem. The industry is full of this crap.

  25. #25
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    square taper non drive ALWAYS has come loose on me... UN 72 any ST BB has done it... it doesn't work for me but I do like it.
    I use octalink as much as I can as I never had an issue with it.
    Been using same BB now for 4 years.

  26. #26
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    my 2 cents

    ISIS was always the red headed stepchild of King Components or perhaps better described as a red herring. Conventional wisdom is King developed ISIS to speed up the release of the external bearing bottom bracket. Shimano pretty much had a lock on square taper BBs as you could buy one for $25 that would last years, but they wanted a new standard riders could upgrade too and Octolink was born. ISIS was supposedly developed as a competing standard to Octolink without having to pay to play with Shimano. There were so many problems with ISIS that one would suspect the standard was designed to fail. First was the diameter of the spindle was too large. ISIS requires smaller ball bearings than square taper or Octolink and they normally failed much sooner. Also the taper of the ISIS spline was a 1 deg taper compared to square taper and Octolink 2 deg taper. This may not sound like much, but in actually, the combination of the smaller bearings and 1 deg of taper, meant ISIS required closer tolerances than Octolink to perform at the same level of reliability and this rarely happened, resulting in the history of ISIS poor performance and reliability. TruVativ played a major part in this debacle. TruVativ, who also makes Bontrager cranks, embraced the ISIS standard and churned out millions of these inexpensive bottom brackets that were doomed to fail. The final nail in the coffin was King Components never made an ISIS bottom bracket. They simply waited until ISIS ran its course and quickly embraced the new external BB standard, leaving TruVativ and Race Face holding the bag. So if you must have ISIS buy the good stuff. Otherwise, as good as square taper is, it’s a dying standard and only being supported by cottage component makers like Phil Wood. The future for now is with external bearing bottom brackets, so unless you’re a retro-grouch, you probably want to go that way, or you may want to wait until the industry goes to BB-30, which I suspect will be the new standard.
    Last edited by aka brad; 06-13-2009 at 11:12 PM.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wickerman1
    square taper non drive ALWAYS has come loose on me... UN 72 any ST BB has done it... it doesn't work for me but I do like it.
    I use octalink as much as I can as I never had an issue with it.
    Been using same BB now for 4 years.
    Have you tried cleaning all the grease, oil and what not from both surfaces, a dab of loctite on the bolt and tighten to ~36lbs?

    That oughta do it.
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  28. #28
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    taking it OT

    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    King ... quickly embraced the new external BB standard.
    ISIS started in 1999
    Shimano made their first external BB crankset in 2004
    King didn't start selling an external BB until 2009

    If King sabotaged ISIS to jump-start external BB's, why did they wait so long to start making money on it?

    Also, ISIS was started as a competitor to Shimano's Octalink but Shimano was the first company to push external BB's. How did King's "sabotage" of ISIS motivate Shimano make this move? Race Face and Truvativ moved to external BB's as well after that because Shimano did it.

    There probably is some other industry history that I'm missing, but on the surface that conspiracy theory just doesn't make sense to me.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by j e SS e
    Have you tried cleaning all the grease, oil and what not from both surfaces, a dab of loctite on the bolt and tighten to ~36lbs?

    That oughta do it.
    i never greased square taper as some say to do it, it is a friction fit( from what I read) I never did use locktite though but its too late because i have nothing on my trail bikes that are square taper anymore lol

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    ISIS started in 1999
    Shimano made their first external BB crankset in 2004
    King didn't start selling an external BB until 2009

    If King sabotaged ISIS to jump-start external BB's, why did they wait so long to start making money on it?

    Also, ISIS was started as a competitor to Shimano's Octalink but Shimano was the first company to push external BB's. How did King's "sabotage" of ISIS motivate Shimano make this move? Race Face and Truvativ moved to external BB's as well after that because Shimano did it.

    There probably is some other industry history that I'm missing, but on the surface that conspiracy theory just doesn't make sense to me.
    ISIS was developed by King Components, yet they never released a bottom bracket in ISIS. King waited for Shimano to release what would become the defacto standard and then took 3-4 years to develop their product. Not only that, King bottom brackets are not compatable with TruVativ cranks. Seriously, I don't know if this is true or not. What I do know is ISIS is certainly inferior to Octolink and quickened the industry's move to the superior external bottom bracket.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    ISIS was developed by King Components, yet they never released a bottom bracket in ISIS. King waited for Shimano to release what would become the defacto standard and then took 3-4 years to develop their product. Not only that, King bottom brackets are not compatable with TruVativ cranks. Seriously, I don't know if this is true or not. What I do know is ISIS is certainly inferior to Octolink and quickened the industry's move to the superior external bottom bracket.
    Sorry, still doesn't compute for me. I'm not saying that the problems of ISIS didn't make consumers more open to external BB's when they came around years later, I'm just saying it would have been such a back-handed, 1-in-a-million strategy if King planned it that way from the beginning. Shimano is a "leader", so how does directing all the major "followers" down the wrong path influence the leader to make new advances?

    I'm going on rumours now too but I was told King helped develop the standard and when they started to realize the compromises involved (i.e. more bearing failure) because of the direction the other companies wanted, King backed out, not wanting their name associated with problematic parts. If King really wanted to push external BB's they wouldn't have wasted money and engineering time to helping to define ISIS first as a knock-off copy of Octalink. They could have simply helped Truvativ and Race Face to develop external BB's and overtake Shimano, if they had that design idea back in 1999. Poorly thought out and flat-out bad decisions seem to be much more common in business than evil scheming

    Also, Truvativ is the one that made their design incompatible with the others from day 1.

  32. #32
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    Does the OP uses a jet wash to clean his bike by any chance?

    I would certainly be checking the facing on the BB shell before putting anything else on the bike - especially external BBs.

    Even a crappy ISIS lasts more than 2 weeks. There's nothing wrong with the quality ISIS BBs, but I'm for square taper any day. Simply works and keeps on working.
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  33. #33
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    Idea!

    Fellas, you don't need to plumb the depths of conspiracy theory to agree on a few notations along the way, some of which I see others will disagree with, but this is the internet.

    ISIS crank/BB designs use a large diameter spindle within the standard BB shell, and therefore require bearings with small diameter balls in them. Such bearings are less durable than those used in a square-taper or even Octalink (all rights reserved) BB.

    External bearing crank/BB designs predate both ISIS and Octalink. For example, I have personally been riding SweetWings cranks since 1995, and these were not the first (why deprive historians from filling this in ?) on the market by a long shot.

    There are bantamweight riders out there that have never had a problem with a square-taper BB and some of them even know how to turn a wrench. Occasionally, one crawls out from the 1980's and tries this internet thing to tell us how great square tapers are, but those of us with girth or muscles are not required to fall for it.

    (and that, gentlemen, is flame bait for suckas)

    Either way, Singlespeeders tend to honk on the pedals and to be mashers who appreciate minimal BB/crank flex. We also tend to wear on drive-side bearings pretty hard. There are some great, old school uber BB's in square taper, and there are also external bearing sets that are stiff(er), light(er) and ubiquitous. I looked that last one up.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by j e SS e
    Square Taper.

    Never an issue.

    As someone who works on bikes, externals make me cry.

    I put em up there with 31.8 bars and stems as unfixing something that always worked to begin with.
    Meh, I work on my own stuff and detest square tapers. They're never without an issue for me.

    OP: Do a little research on the truvativ cranksets, you'll find that a lot of people have had issues with keeping the non-drive side crank arm torqued. Pick a set with a nut to set tension and pinch bolts to actually fasten the crank arm to the spindle. Shimano does it this way, and I believe FSA does too.

  35. #35
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    square tapers always went bad on me. Not so much the bottom bracket, but the crank arms. I've lost track of how many crank arms i've rounded out.
    I have a stylo external bearing crankset on my puss. first mud hole i went through, the bearings were toast (crank was 2 weeks old). They feel like crap, but 3 years later, i'm still using them lol. I have noticed that the bearing cups arent bored out the same on both sides. One is an extremely tight fit, probably .001" tighter than it should be, which is alot (i'm a machinist). This isnt helping the bearing life. They really need to work on boring them more accurately.
    I have the first xtr external bearing crank on my geared bike, circa 2001. It has the original supposively defective bottom bracket, and its as smooth as silk. And it's got some serious mileage/abuse on it.
    Basically it's all luck of the draw.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    square tapers always went bad on me. Not so much the bottom bracket, but the crank arms. I've lost track of how many crank arms i've rounded out.
    I have a stylo external bearing crankset on my puss. first mud hole i went through, the bearings were toast (crank was 2 weeks old). They feel like crap, but 3 years later, i'm still using them lol. I have noticed that the bearing cups arent bored out the same on both sides. One is an extremely tight fit, probably .001" tighter than it should be, which is alot (i'm a machinist). This isnt helping the bearing life. They really need to work on boring them more accurately.
    I have the first xtr external bearing crank on my geared bike, circa 2001. It has the original supposively defective bottom bracket, and its as smooth as silk. And it's got some serious mileage/abuse on it.
    Basically it's all luck of the draw.
    I believe the Truvativ design is supposed to have different sizes on both sides. Instead of having adjustable pre-load for the bearings, the spindle should have a hard stop of some sort when pressed into the non-drive-side bearing and then the drive-size bearing is allowed to float

    The different sizes on both sides is why their cranks and BBs are not interchangeable with Shimano/Race Face/FSA stuff

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    Does the OP uses a jet wash to clean his bike by any chance?

    I would certainly be checking the facing on the BB shell before putting anything else on the bike - especially external BBs.

    Even a crappy ISIS lasts more than 2 weeks. There's nothing wrong with the quality ISIS BBs, but I'm for square taper any day. Simply works and keeps on working.
    I haven't gotten enough ride time to need to wash my bike, usually I use dish soap and the same mit I wash my car with, then rinse with the hose There wasn't any signs of water inside the BB, adn this last one that went I never got a chance to get the bike muddy as it started creaking on a crushed gravel trail riding with the wife

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    ISIS was developed by King Components.
    Actually you have your facts wrong it was Truvativ's development, King just liked the idea. "In 1999, while we were working on the BB, Truvativ approached us about a new, open standard for a BB/crank interface. We loved the idea. Truvativ quickly got support from other companies in the bike industry and together, Truvativ, Race Face and King began working on what would become the ISIS Drive standard." This is a quote from King's 2002 website.

  39. #39
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    Live in the now.

  40. #40
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    I have an ISIS Middleburn RS8 crankset.

    My BB is an SKF FR 600 series. This is the top of the line SKF BB with stainless body and spindle. It is now doing duty on my SS after 2 years of service on my Yeti ASR and 2 years prior to that on my Yeti ARC.

    SKF are not a bike component company, they are a specialist bearing company. They got their shiz together before the brought an ISIS BB to the market place. Drive side bearings are rollers, not balls, seals are brilliant, all metal parts in the 600 series model are rust proof.

    The BB runs smooth as a babies bottom and hasn't skipped a beat since the first day I installed it. If ISIS had been done this well from day one, there wouldn't be any outboard bearings on the market as they are simply not neccesary.

    if your crankset is ISIS spline, get your LBS to get in an SKF botttom bracket and kiss any of your BB death problems goodbye.

  41. #41
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    Picked the bike up last night, has some big ass gaudy external bearings and some pretty nice looking crank arms. We'll see how well they work though, after this week of rain we are getting starting today.

    lame

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    they are NOT ADDRESSING THE PROBLEM. there is an issue with the facing on the BB shell (and / or alignment of BB shell in frame)....there is no other way that ANY BB will go south after 2 weeks other than badly uneven preload on the bearings. (or riding underwater as the other poster mentioned...)

    seriously though if you are honestly trashing a BB every 2 weeks then it IS NOT the BB at fault. get the shop to do their job properly, please!
    The face of the BB shell has no impact on a one piece bottom bracket like ISIS, Octalink, or most square tapers. The BB's body keeps the bearings aligned, not the frame. The frame's BB shell's face is only important on external bearing bottom brackets.

    If the shell were off enough to cause an issue with a one piece BB's bearing alignment, there's be no way you'd even be able to thread it in to begin with.

    The one problem I might see being an issue is if the shell wasn't perpendicular to the frame, because then you'd see much more axial loading of the BB bearing than radial. But even then, I don't see that causing a failure within a week or two.

    To the OP, I think you've had a combination of bad luck and cheap bottom brackets. I suspect the new BB will probably last a while, but you should definitely make sure they faced the BB shell this time around, since you've gone to an external.

  43. #43
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    Bike shop appears to have got you to pony up for a whole new crankset and external BB because they couldn't do a crank install reliably...

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullrange Drew
    Bike shop appears to have got you to pony up for a whole new crankset and external BB because they couldn't do a crank install reliably...
    Hey now... if you read the OP's posting, you know the shop is performing this work under warranty!

    Efff, since you're an established destroyer of bottom brackets, I'm gonna expect you to report back on the durability of the Stylo the shop has installed! Is it the OCT Stylo 1.1 (it will either say just GXP or GXP and OCT on the driveside arm) that they gave you? (Either way, both come with Truvativ's GXP bottom bracket).

  45. #45
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    Ah, my bad.

    Still not sure an entire new OB bearing crankset is required...

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I believe the Truvativ design is supposed to have different sizes on both sides. Instead of having adjustable pre-load for the bearings, the spindle should have a hard stop of some sort when pressed into the non-drive-side bearing and then the drive-size bearing is allowed to float

    The different sizes on both sides is why their cranks and BBs are not interchangeable with Shimano/Race Face/FSA stuff
    the different size of the id of the bearing is why they are different from shimano. The aluminum bearing cup on one side was WAY too tight, and deformed the outer race of the bearing, causing the bearing to be extremely tight and gritty feeling. The other side was a fairly decent press fit.

  47. #47
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    15 miles in the rain / muck today and no noises. Thats 13 miles longer then the last one lasted So far so good.

  48. #48
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    Here's the new crank set installed, and my new WTB seat that I'm going to toss. This seat is freaking huge, anybody want to trade? I bent the saddle that came on my bike, and I'd like another one of the same. This one is too wide for me.






  49. #49
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    I son't know the circumstances involving the failure for the OP, but I never killed an ISIS bb, including being on the SRX cheapie for about 4 years. I simple purged them with tons of grease upon install. In many cases, I believe this to be the real problem. Contamination, not the lack of load carrying capacity.

    However, I am now using the Truvative Stylo GXP setup and it's fine. It's just an understated, simple system. I was convinced when I noted that my gf has been running hers since 2005, and she's an absolute hammerhead on the pedals. Though she's very light in weight, she can definitely kill cranks with the power and rpm's she's running. I only regreased them a couple months ago after cleaning them out and they still work great. I don't recommend they go that long in between regreasing, but they were fine. The grease was just a bit dry.

    I wanted to try the SKF BB, but I needed something new and they came online after I swapped.

    I also had good experiences with Shimano Octalinks, though my 952 BB was the only one I wore out. It was used, however. For the most part, I'm surprised people got way more life out of the Shimanos than out of ISIS.

  50. #50
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    Great pics, Efff! Way to go on getting it back and hammering it immediately! Score on the cranks, too. Here's hoping you buck the trend and matters are resolved.

    [Being a sap that orders from the LBS, I am waiting, waiting, waiting for my set of those cranks, due Friday, for my 69er... so I love this thread.]

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    the different size of the id of the bearing is why they are different from shimano. The aluminum bearing cup on one side was WAY too tight, and deformed the outer race of the bearing, causing the bearing to be extremely tight and gritty feeling. The other side was a fairly decent press fit.
    Ahh, I misread your post

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by EBasil
    Great pics, Efff! Way to go on getting it back and hammering it immediately! Score on the cranks, too. Here's hoping you buck the trend and matters are resolved.

    [Being a sap that orders from the LBS, I am waiting, waiting, waiting for my set of those cranks, due Friday, for my 69er... so I love this thread.]
    Its a bit frustrating thats for sure, I ordered an 09 Rig so if I have any more problems with this bike I have something else to ride while its in the shop. I love this Trek, and the bike shop seems to be handling everything as fast as they can so I shouldn't complain.

    I hammered another 22 miles out today, so far soo good.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    I was convinced when I noted that my gf has been running hers since 2005, and she's an absolute hammerhead on the pedals. Though she's very light in weight, she can definitely kill cranks with the power and rpm's she's running.
    Pictures. We demand them.
    Last edited by bad mechanic; 06-17-2009 at 03:53 PM.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    ISIS was developed by King Components, yet they never released a bottom bracket in ISIS. King waited for Shimano to release what would become the defacto standard and then took 3-4 years to develop their product. Not only that, King bottom brackets are not compatable with TruVativ cranks. Seriously, I don't know if this is true or not. What I do know is ISIS is certainly inferior to Octolink and quickened the industry's move to the superior external bottom bracket.
    are you retarded

  55. #55
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    Good job!

    I put the Stylo OCT on my 69er, too. I've only got about 22 miles on them, but they sure turn like them other cranks I got. Ho ho.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  56. #56
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    BB is making noise AGAIN. Bikeshop gave me a ton of grief when I stopped in to drop the bike off today, and honestly I understand but I don't see how this re-occuring problem is my fault, I have less then 250 miles on it since NEW. Could this possibly be a frame problem?

    I bought a RIG to hold me over until this bike is up and running again, but man is it frustrating.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Efff
    BB is making noise AGAIN. Bikeshop gave me a ton of grief when I stopped in to drop the bike off today, and honestly I understand but I don't see how this re-occuring problem is my fault, I have less then 250 miles on it since NEW. Could this possibly be a frame problem?
    Ask them is they faced the bottom bracket shell before installing the cups. If not, the cups need to be pulled, the bottom bracket shell faces, and new bearings installed in the cups. I'd recommend picking up some Enduro bearings and getting the shop to put them in for you.

  58. #58
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    I asked them to do that before the last bb went in, and they claimed they did it. I'm guessing they didn't do it and said they did for fun, and I'm REALLY starting to get irritated with the techs at this shop. This is the Wheel and Sprocket in Hales Corners, Wi

  59. #59
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    this ain't right. there is no way to go through all those BB's. there is a major problem somewhere. check the BB facing, even the BB shell could be warped or something. your chain isn't uber tight?

    seriously check that frame out carefully
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  60. #60
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    chain isn't tight, I haven't changed ANTYHING on the bike besides pedals. I normally do my own maint. but I am not TOUCHING this bike with anything but my bike rack until this problem is fixed. They had no answers for me today so I'm waiting on the warranty guy to call me tomorrow and I'm sure he will blow smoke up my ass about it being my fault ( impossible ). I don't know what to do anymore, is it worth calling trek again? They suggested to try the external bb the last time around, and it lasted for less then 100 miles before the noise came back. Its getting rediculous, half of my summer gone cause of this damn bike.

    I dunno what to do, this seriously blows. Its pretty bad when you have to buy another bike because the one you bought brand new not even 6 months ago can't stay on the trail more then 2 hours at a time. Do I contact Trek direct or a manager at the bike shop? I am kind of leary of talking to the manager at the shop because he tried to screw me by switching a bunch of parts off the bike at the time of the sale to begin with, so I'm assuming he will be of no help. It really feels like they are just waiting for the warranty to expire so they can tell me to screw off. I paid asking price for the bike, I guess I should have avoided it since it was priced so well. Maybe they knew it was a lemon and Trek refused to replace it? Who knows, I'm getting tired.
    Last edited by Efff; 07-05-2009 at 10:28 PM.

  61. #61
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    That sucks. I had a similar problem with a dissimilar frame, and the manufacturer ended up replacing it, so that I can put it on ebay. Having an experience like that sure made me want to never see the frame again.

    Anyway, I think you should get an external BB tool and back one of the BB cups out, is there paint on the surface? It should be plain to tell if the shell has been faced, it will look super flat and machined, with an almost sharp edge around it. Even without paint you should be able to tell. While your cup is backed out try and thread it back in by hand, it should go back in without trouble. That can be done without the bike shop knowing. Next I would take it in there and look over their shoulder while they use an outside caliper to measure various spots around the outside of the BB shell, and see if they come up with any strange measurements. I'm not sure why, if you do your own maintenance, you're not in there doing some quality assurance on those mechanics.

    I would call Trek, if just to open up a line of communication with them. Call and explain your situation, and ask for that particular person's extension, and then call them again and again to update them on your situation. Eventually they've got to see the problem is not being resolved by any of the other avenues, and have to at least get the frame back for an inspection, if not a replacement. That's how I see it anyway. Trek has a good warranty department, by most accounts, so I wouldn't worry about this problem being permanent, just extremely frustrating in the short term.

    Good luck!

  62. #62
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    I don't consider 6 months short term myself, but I suppose it may be because I am very impatient.

    I am unable to watch over their shoulders due to my funky work schedule. The thing is I shouldn't have to, especially since they KNOW that this is a problematic issue with this bike and you would think they would want to fix it and not have to see it in the shop again. This is a rather LARGE local bike shop, I think they have 5 stores South Eastern Wisconsin.

    I did call Trek the last time the bike was in for service 2 weeks ago and they know I have had several BB problems. The guy on the phone assured me that this SHOULD be the final fix, and I'm assuming they will be helpful when contacting them again. Trek isn't far from me, I believe they are located in Madison which is about an hour away. I would like to take the bike out there myself and have someone that WORKS at / for Trek to look over this bike and see what kind of suggestions they have to offer as those of the bike shop are not sufficient at this point.

  63. #63
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    Thanks again for the suggestions guys, I am going to get Trek on the horn again in the AM and see what they suggest I do / get done.

  64. #64
    Beware the Blackbuck!
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    I had a funky work schedule at one point too, but even in the 30 minutes prior to going in I would take the bike over to the LBS and have them verify what I was finding wrong with my bike. I agree 6 months isn't the "short term," but I mostly meant that you're getting to ride the bike two weeks at a time with two weeks off. Two weeks is the short term, and I believe it will be fixed permanently. I cant' see how Trek wouldn't want to get that bike back at this point, if it's having this many problems, they have to feel like either the LBS is crap, or the bike is a lemon, and they're the ones with the fix to both of those problems, they look at it them selves, or they send out a new frame.

  65. #65
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    Sounds like a new frame will be on its way in a few days. Yay, now I get flowers ( lame ). Oh well, hopefully this fixes the problem for good.

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