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  1. #1
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    Training / Road Miles on a SS

    Would it be beneficial to train long road miles on a SS, lets say 25-30 miles? Or would I just be spinning my self tired ???? My goal is to become a stronger SS rider and sometimes I just want to start a ride from my front door instead of driving 45 minutes to my favorite MTB trails. Or would I get better road/training miles on geared bike.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaskar
    Would it be beneficial to train long road miles on a SS, lets say 25-30 miles? Or would I just be spinning my self tired ???? My goal is to become a stronger SS rider and sometimes I just want to start a ride from my front door instead of driving 45 minutes to my favorite MTB trails. Or would I get better road/training miles on geared bike.
    I can only give you my own experience, since I've been SS'ing for about 2 months since getting back into riding. My buddy convinced me to try CX racing this upcoming season, I even got a good deal on a used IF Planet X.

    I've been back into riding road since last Oct, about once a week. Then I got an SS running 36:18. I've used that at least once a week, as a road training bike. I've got a combo of hills and flats and on the flats, I do spin out occasionally. This weekend I changed to a 44:18 to make the hills more challenging. Enough so, that I over torqued my BB yesterday.

    But now when I take out my CX on the singletrack, I can climb WAY better and faster than I ever could on a triple ring w/ my MTB. My legs feel stronger and I've got much more stamina. Hopefully this will give me an advantage come september...

  3. #3
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    yes

    i believe that road training will help. i have been commuting to work on my singlespeed and when i went for my weekly ride after a few weeks, i found the hills easier and in general the ride much easier. and as a side note, jumping from 36 to 44 to make the hills more challenging, thats quite a jump!

  4. #4
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    Hitchhikers Guide?

    Quote Originally Posted by dompedro3
    The spaceship hovered in the air in
    much the same way as a brick does not

    Dom,
    Is your signature a Quote from the Hitchhikers Guide Trilogy?
    The next best thing to playin' and winnin' is playin' and losin'

  5. #5
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    it is!

    they certainly are, both of them. i love those books!

  6. #6
    Retro Grouch
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    Works for me...

    Quote Originally Posted by zaskar
    Would it be beneficial to train long road miles on a SS, lets say 25-30 miles? Or would I just be spinning my self tired ???? My goal is to become a stronger SS rider and sometimes I just want to start a ride from my front door instead of driving 45 minutes to my favorite MTB trails. Or would I get better road/training miles on geared bike.
    I'm basically an old roadie turned mountain biker, turned single speeder. I started riding SS about 3 years ago and wondered the same thing as you, so what I did was convert my old road bike to a SS with 42:18 gearing. This turned out to be pretty low and I spun out alot on the flats. If however you chose a ride with a lot of climbing it can be quite challenging. During this time I also aquired a fixed gear bike with 47:18 gearing. At first the gearing seemed impossibly high, but over a year or so I progressed to the point where I could climb all the hills I was doing with the lower gearing.

    It is worth noting that SS road riding has no real speed advantage to geared road riding. Most SS riders will tell you they are faster on a SS MTB than it's geared counterpart; this is not the case with road riding. The only exception I can think of was terminaut winning a criterium on his SS crit bike with some un-godly high gear; something like a 52:16. I would file that under, "Don't try this a home". Anyway I am hooked on SS and have riddden several centuries on both SS and fixed gear bikes over the years and its a hoot.

    So to answer your question I would say what ever gets you on a bike, do it. A fixed gear makes the rides a little more challenging but you can still have fun with a freewheel.

    1G1G, Brad

  7. #7
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    Favorite

    Quote Originally Posted by dompedro3
    they certainly are, both of them. i love those books!
    As uneducated as this may sound. Those are my favorite books of all time. A must read!

    Matter of fact I think I'll reread them soon.
    The next best thing to playin' and winnin' is playin' and losin'

  8. #8
    34N 118W
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    profile?

    you didn't mention whether it's hilly or flat, but I'm assuming some hills if you're in NorCal. For flat miles I'd go fixed gear, no question. For some little rollers, still fixie. For bigger ups & downs, SS freewheel or gears. Big, paved downhills should be bombed, not fought IMO. Fixie will make you smile and make you stronger.

    HW


    Quote Originally Posted by zaskar
    Would it be beneficial to train long road miles on a SS, lets say 25-30 miles? Or would I just be spinning my self tired ???? My goal is to become a stronger SS rider and sometimes I just want to start a ride from my front door instead of driving 45 minutes to my favorite MTB trails. Or would I get better road/training miles on geared bike.

  9. #9
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    I'm with the others on recommending a fixed gear. For mine, there is no better way to improve strength and pedalling technique than on a fixie.

    Another point, while it's completely subjective, I wouldn't call 25-30 miles "long road miles". If you are wanting to train to race mountain bikes, I think you'll find it beneficial to do much longer rides than that, though you should only work up to this level gradually on a fixie - a relatively short ride will probably be more than enough the first few times out.

    Sam

  10. #10
    Cold. Blue. Steel.
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    hate to drive to ride

    i don't like to use my car, especially to go for a bike ride!
    i have been single speeding for 3 years (and riding for 17),and i just jump on my SS -with around a 2-1 gear ratio- and head out on the roads to my local trails. probably get in an extra 8-10 miles each way which is an ideal warm up and cool down for me. it is quite mountainous here, so the gear works out. i am also getting ready for some solo 12 and 24 hour races, so the more time on the SS, the better!

    what is good for you is good for you. enjoy!
    Spinning and Grinning...

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