Titanium Single Speed Gears- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Titanium Single Speed Gears

    Hello,

    Mike over here at Mtbti.com. We are getting ready to launch our titanium single speed rear cogs and wanted to get some feedback from our target audience. We have had great success with the titanium bolt kits and want to expand into the ti single speed market. I ride my single speed more than my geared bikes so this made sense for our company.


    Gear sizing: 16-23 tooth, Shimano inner spline

    Gear weight: 24 grams for the 18 tooth (more weights to come as I only have the prototype in 18 tooth).

    Material: Grade 5 (6AL-4v) Titanium made here in the U.S.A.

    Wear resistance is similar to steel without the weight penalty.

    Pricing will be between $69.95-$99.95 depending on tooth count.


    Thank you to everyone who helped on this project and lets hear comments/questions. A very special thanks to the guys at The Path Bike Shop for their help.

    Here are some pictures of the prototype.

    IMG_0037.JPG

    IMG_0038.JPG

    IMG_0039.JPG

  2. #2
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    Very nice - I'll want some at that price
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  3. #3
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    drool... i want one with titanium spacers.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  4. #4
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    dammit that looks cool. Defintely intrested.

  5. #5
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    any chance of making larger ones (25t~28t)?

    definently interested...

  6. #6
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    Sounds great as long as they are lighter than aluminum cogs and last 2.5-3 times as long...
    Last edited by gunit; 07-03-2008 at 01:41 PM.

  7. #7
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    I want the option of thicker teeth for 1/8" chains.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    I want the option of thicker teeth for 1/8" chains.
    Out of curiosity, why do you want thicker teeth? I have a BMX cog presumably designed for use with 1/8 BMX chains, and the teeth are not particularly thick.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunit
    Out of curiosity, why do you want thicker teeth? I have a BMX cog presumably designed for use with 1/8 BMX chains, and the teeth are not particularly thick.
    When Boone was making cogs I special-ordered the thicker teeth. You get a much longer life from the cogs/rings, even more life than expected with a 33% wider tooth (3/32 -> 4/32). I use BMX chains.

    BMX cogs have taller teeth for keeping the chain. I don't know of high mileage BMX riders.

  10. #10
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    These seem quite a bit more money than the Boone. They'll probably still sell.

    Nice looking, if a bit plain.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunit
    Sounds great as long as they are lighter than aluminum cogs and last 2.5-3 times as long...

    Aluminum will always be the lightest but it wears out very quickly. Titanium is 40% lighter than steel with similar wear characteristics.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    When Boone was making cogs I special-ordered the thicker teeth. You get a much longer life from the cogs/rings, even more life than expected with a 33% wider tooth (3/32 -> 4/32). I use BMX chains.

    BMX cogs have taller teeth for keeping the chain. I don't know of high mileage BMX riders.

    That is interesting. Ya I have no idea how many miles a regular BMX rider puts in, or what their loading patterns are like vs mountain biking. Since you keep detailed records of your mileage, what kind of service intervals have you gotten out of the different kinds of cogs that you have used? Do you use them until they begin to slip, do you flip them for double the fun? The real question is whether custom and fancy pants cogs are cost effective versus their cheaper brethren... or whether they provide greater performance.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy
    These seem quite a bit more money than the Boone. They'll probably still sell.

    Nice looking, if a bit plain.
    Remember that these are the prototypes. The retail version will have chamfered holes and maybe a few more holes. The holes will also be polished and we are looking into anodizing. So if you have any favorite colors please voice your opinions.

    What we were going after was a super light gear that is machined with high tolerances. The gear slides onto shimano's splines like a glove. Most single speed bike owners are always going after the lightest this or that. Also the inner spline is 50% wider (similar to boone) to spread the load across the freehub.

    We will definitely take into consideration of a thicker tooth version for a bmx chain.

  14. #14
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    Looks nice, I'd be interested.

    FYI... your website needs some serious work if you really want to sell stuff online.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dumbaSS
    Looks nice, I'd be interested.

    FYI... your website needs some serious work if you really want to sell stuff online.
    Thank you. Been working on the site all day. The old site is up and running now. If you have any other questions about the gears please feel free to email me.

    Mike

  16. #16
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    Boone Cogs are making a comeback........

    Boone cogs.....................
    I'm going to start shipping July 14.....or I'll post bad things about Brett...

    No, for really your cogs look great, Good Luck

    If you are interested in Boone Cogs let me know and I'll send you a complete price list.
    Mike

  17. #17
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    Alum anodizes beautifully but I was unaware that Ti would anodize just as well? What kind of color choices would we have?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    I want the option of thicker teeth for 1/8" chains.
    I run 1/8" BMX chains on all of my bikes and mix and match 3/32" and 1/8" chainrings, freewheels and track cogs without any issues or shortened life because of wear. Swap the chain out when it's worn and you'll be fine. $.02
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by miketech1
    Pricing will be between $69.95-$99.95 depending on tooth count.
    As someone who owns goth Boone and Spot Ti cogs, that seems a little steep. More than a WI freewheel, which many people still balk at.

    Speaking of which, it looks like you might have the wherewithal to machine a replacement cog for a WI freewheel. . .

  20. #20
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    Boone cogs look like art work for nearly half the price. WTF?!?

    Thanks to Tani (at the Path) a 20 tooth Boone Ti cost only 40$.

    No anodize needed, just polished and matte finish. Show it's Ti-ness. The ano is your only gimmick to get paid more than they are worth.
    Yeah I gotta question. You got any excuses tonight Roy ? -Antonio Tarver

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evel Knievel
    Boone cogs look like art work for nearly half the price. WTF?!?

    Thanks to Tani (at the Path) a 20 tooth Boone Ti cost only 40$.

    No anodize needed, just polished and matte finish. Show it's Ti-ness. The ano is your only gimmick to get paid more than they are worth.
    Hello Evel,

    Thank you for your opinion. Like I said before in one of my posts the pictures you see are just the prototypes. No polishing or finish work has been done. Not even sure if the holes you see will be on the final product. What we were more after was lightness and exact measurements for the inner spline and teeth.

    I will take 10 boone cogs for $40 at the path if they were in stock. They haven't had them for quite some time now. And I am pretty sure they wouldn't be $40 in todays market but I could be wrong.

    As far as anodizing I was just throwing it out there as it is an option. Matching your other component colors seems to be popular these days.

    Thanks again.

  22. #22
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    And Boone cogs are three pieces riveted together. This is one piece.

    compare to this: http://www.singlespeeder.de/os-comme...5f196049932981

    139 euros is about 220 dollars. But you get a very thick base!!!!!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunit
    That is interesting. Ya I have no idea how many miles a regular BMX rider puts in, or what their loading patterns are like vs mountain biking. Since you keep detailed records of your mileage, what kind of service intervals have you gotten out of the different kinds of cogs that you have used? Do you use them until they begin to slip, do you flip them for double the fun? The real question is whether custom and fancy pants cogs are cost effective versus their cheaper brethren... or whether they provide greater performance.
    I rotate among different size cogs depending on how hard I want to ride. My mileages for the cogs are just estimates. A 20T regular with 3000 miles is good but a slight shark toothing is starting. A 20T thick is still sharp.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiDaDunlop
    And Boone cogs are three pieces riveted together. This is one piece.

    compare to this: http://www.singlespeeder.de/os-comme...5f196049932981

    139 euros is about 220 dollars. But you get a very thick base!!!!!
    riveting to increase the base thickness is much cheaper manufacturing-wise than starting with a billet of ti and machining away the excess until you have a final product. machined billet in this application makes no sense; there is too much material waste.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by miketech1
    Hello Evel,

    Thank you for your opinion. Like I said before in one of my posts the pictures you see are just the prototypes. No polishing or finish work has been done. Not even sure if the holes you see will be on the final product. What we were more after was lightness and exact measurements for the inner spline and teeth.

    I will take 10 boone cogs for $40 at the path if they were in stock. They haven't had them for quite some time now. And I am pretty sure they wouldn't be $40 in todays market but I could be wrong.

    As far as anodizing I was just throwing it out there as it is an option. Matching your other component colors seems to be popular these days.

    Thanks again.
    OK it was a couple a years ago on a "hey look at at these quick, before it's gone sale".

    If that i the new going rate I would still be inclined to buy Ti again, due to its long wear. I'm sure the Path will get my business. Be on the shelves and you got another sale.
    Yeah I gotta question. You got any excuses tonight Roy ? -Antonio Tarver

    There is room for it all, just ride what you like to on what you like to...that's freeriding. -rbn14



  26. #26
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    ticogs

    "riveting to increase the base thickness is much cheaper manufacturing-wise than starting with a billet of ti and machining away the excess until you have a final product. machined billet in this application makes no sense; there is too much material waste."

    Yups and thats one reason why its more expensive. I will pay extra for a wider one piece base. But for me you can stop making camfered holes and artsy fartsy machining.
    Last edited by DiDaDunlop; 07-04-2008 at 03:30 PM. Reason: too much info

  27. #27
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    i also think they could look better, boone cogs look soo sexy, those prototypes, and i know that they are that, but the pattern just looks like any other cog out there. maybe you could look at some bmx sprockets for inspiration,like something similer to the odyssey vermont or tree spoke sprockets or something. then it'd look so killer, id buy one at any price.

    and i do know that boone cogs in todays market would sell for alot more if still made, the increasing price of TI is one of the things that caused M2racer to stop making products. so given that understanding yours are probally pretty reasonably priced overall.


    ALSO!!!!!! like someone else said, if you could make new teeth for my White Ind. freewheel that'd be killer! Ti upgrade parts for those would be awesome!

  28. #28
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    I don't care what they look like so long as they are LIGHT and HARD WEARING. A wide base is a big plus for those who do a lot of uphill grinding - don't have to worry about chewing up the freehub body, so can then use an alloy instead of steel one, and save even more weight.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiDaDunlop
    ... I will pay extra for a wider one piece base. But for me you can stop making camfered holes and artsy fartsy machining.
    Same here. I don't want my bike to be gaudy. I had a Boone cog and sold it, although I would have kept it if it had been reversible. Give me longevity and intelligent design (no religious inference). I still think King cogs look best -- clean, simple & spare.

    I'd probably buy one of these if I needed another cog. Price seems reasonable considering what it is.

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  30. #30
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    "stop making camfered holes and artsy fartsy"

    Quote Originally Posted by DiDaDunlop
    "riveting to increase the base thickness is much cheaper manufacturing-wise than starting with a billet of ti and machining away the excess until you have a final product. machined billet in this application makes no sense; there is too much material waste."

    Yups and thats one reason why its more expensive. I will pay extra for a wider one piece base. But for me you can stop making camfered holes and artsy fartsy machining.
    function

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiDaDunlop
    And Boone cogs are three pieces riveted together. This is one piece.

    compare to this: http://www.singlespeeder.de/os-comme...5f196049932981

    139 euros is about 220 dollars. But you get a very thick base!!!!!
    Seems like Bruce Boone is more interested in making wedding rings these days?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    Seems like Bruce Boone is more interested in making wedding rings these days?
    much more money made in wedding rings im sure, like billions or quadrillions more. per ring.

    but really think about how simple to make a ring compared to cogs,and materials, then think about a ring($300) or cog($75)

  33. #33
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    wide base and hard wearing...

    are keys for me. run I9 wheels on my 29er and the freehub got eaten up with a niner cog. use king or boone for the base. would go for a wider base like the one shown from germany (severe bling factor)

    wider for an 1/8 chain would be good, but I have not had problems on my boones with either a 1/8 or 3/32 chain.

    any chance you are going to do front rings?? if so XTR 960 bolt pattern, 32, 34 and 44 and I'll buy them today!

  34. #34
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    Why Ti? Most people will put it on a steel framed bike.

  35. #35
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    Why a Ti bike? why singlespeed? Why gears?

    There are a lot of questions that do not need to be asked.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    When Boone was making cogs I special-ordered the thicker teeth. You get a much longer life from the cogs/rings, even more life than expected with a 33% wider tooth (3/32 -> 4/32). I use BMX chains.

    BMX cogs have taller teeth for keeping the chain. I don't know of high mileage BMX riders.
    Actually, a lot of top BMX racers train long distance on their bike. When I designed at Redline, I worked with John Purse. He would regularly ride for 20 miles in one day on his BMX bike. Of course, all his stuff was free so we never really talked about tooth life on his bike

    Oh - and nice looking gear. I think you will sell a lot if they are under $100 and wear well.

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