Thingle speed shift- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thingle speed shift

    After trying my hand at SS, the wheels started turning (in my head). I thought," It'd be nice to have a second speed, but without the trouble of stopping to dingle shift". Then it came to me. I built myself a Thingle (or at least that's what came to mind). My GT has 3 chainrings, with a 36t middle and 26t small ring. The big ring I'll cut down to make a bash ring. I used a front deraileur, and limited it's movement to 2 rings, and built a 2 stage chain tensioner to take up the slack. It works great, and gives me two speeds with on the fly shifting. And as an added bonus, I put a 2nd sprocket on the back, so I can dingle shift into an additional 2 gear ratios if needed. Now I'm thinking "Jesus tap dancing Christ, I'm a genius!".

    Pictures show chain tension in each gear.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Thingle speed shift-image05122012130831.jpg  

    Thingle speed shift-image05122012130812.jpg  

    Thingle speed shift-image05122012130724.jpg  

    Thingle speed shift-image05122012130656.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Saw a setup like yours once on the trail. It's a pretty good idea with just enough gap in between ratios IMHO. But boy that thing is noisy with chain slap. If cash permits, I'd get a Hammerschmidt at the front. But that's wishful thinking on my side.

  3. #3
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    I keep thinking about doing this. Maybe I'll snag a melvin and give it a whirl.

  4. #4
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    For me its because cassettes are fragile, expensive, heavy, and I generally destroy the 18 or 20t cog and have to replace a $70 cassette because of it. A cassette weighs almost a pound, and an extra chain ring weighs 40g

  5. #5
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Not really sure I agree on the genius thing, to me it looks like you've turned your bike into a geared bike, but in a rather complex way. If you like having different ratios to play with and easy shifts, why not just do a tried and tested 1x9 instead of trying to reinvent the wheel?

  6. #6
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    gawd awful ugly reflectors...bah! Other than that looks nice!
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  7. #7
    DIY all the way
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandrenseren View Post
    Not really sure I agree on the genius thing, to me it looks like you've turned your bike into a geared bike, but in a rather complex way. If you like having different ratios to play with and easy shifts, why not just do a tried and tested 1x9 instead of trying to reinvent the wheel?
    As to why, that is pretty simple to answer: because he can!


    Magura

  8. #8
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    I've thought about the "reduced gears" drivetrain, or the "not so singlespeed", but sticking with a single ring up front.

    I was thinking along the lines of a 2:1 ratio, but with a "downhill fireroad" gear and a "crap, that's steep" gear. So something like 32:16, but with a 13 and a 19 on the rear too (for example).

    Forget the front shifting, that's yechy, just run a short cage road derailleur on the rear and mount up an old road friction shifter.

    The only thing preventing me from classing myself as a genius is that I haven't got off my butt to do it yet.

    Grumps

  9. #9
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    As you may notice, the tires on this bike aren't very good for trails. Chain slap is nonexistant where it's ridden. In the lowest gear, the chain tension would give a little slap on trails. Otherwise, it's become a very good setup.

    I never really paid attention to the reflectors. They are pretty ugly. I don't really mind, though.

  10. #10
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    I've thought about the "reduced gears" drivetrain, or the "not so singlespeed", but sticking with a single ring up front.
    I've thought about fitting one of those 2-speed rear hubs that shifts when backpedaling, no cables or derailleurs needed and it would give me a 2:1 for the bumpy stuff and a faster gear for the flat bit to and from the trails. But then again, I'm not really in that much of a hurry..

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    Forget the front shifting, that's yechy, just run a short cage road derailleur on the rear and mount up an old road friction shifter.

    Grumps
    The cool thing about the front derailleur is that you won't drop your chain.

  12. #12
    Phobia of petting zoos.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    The cool thing about the front derailleur is that you won't drop your chain.
    Good point.

    A jump-stop or similar gadget would do that to, and not look like a derailleur cobbled up as a chain retainer. I think if you don't need the shifting, then go with a simpler option. of course, front derailleurs are generally cheaper wif you trawl through your parts bin.

    I agree that a chain retainer would be good and I had overlooked that fact, so please don't take this as argument.

    Grumps

  13. #13
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    Argument? Who ordered an argument? Was is a 5 or 10min argument?

  14. #14
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    White Industries Double-Double.
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
    I am a poser. But forums.poser.com doesn't seem to exist, so I come here instead. ;)

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Eddie View Post
    White Industries Double-Double.
    That's just a dingle kit. My setup shifts from 26/16 to 36/16 without stopping. ( Or 26/18 to 36/18 if I stop to move the chain over to the 2nd sprocket.) Considdering the White Ind kit is close to $400, and my setup cost me $45, I'm feeling pretty good ( Forte SS conversion kit $25, Sram 8-speed chain $20). Having a vertical mill in my shop helps, but anyone could duplicate this mod with basic tools. I scavenged a tension wheel and tension spring from an old derailleur, so those parts were totally cost free.

  16. #16
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    Thats pretty cool. The next upgrade should be a shifter for the rear, and a derailleur. You can already use the "cable thingy" on the chain stay as a cable stop. Then you could have an official 4spd.

    Sorry, just had to be a smart ass. I know I would not have thought of rigging up a tensioner like that. Most likely I would have just run a rear der. and called it a day.

  17. #17
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    Really like the homemade Melvin-type tensioner.

    I ran a 2x1 with a Melvin tensioner for a while on my pub crawler. It was a very simple way to achieve a 2-speed setup and worked flawlessly.

  18. #18
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandrenseren View Post
    I've thought about fitting one of those 2-speed rear hubs that shifts when backpedaling, no cables or derailleurs needed and it would give me a 2:1 for the bumpy stuff and a faster gear for the flat bit to and from the trails. But then again, I'm not really in that much of a hurry..
    I have a Stermey Archer 2 speed kick back on my non-every day ride...

    Works good but!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! HEAVY

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt J View Post
    My setup shifts from 26/16 to 36/16 without stopping.
    What's it doing in the SS forum? We're glad you're working on your bike and having fun, but perhaps the drivetrain forum would be a better place for this.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by peanutbutter View Post
    What's it doing in the SS forum? We're glad you're working on your bike and having fun, but perhaps the drivetrain forum would be a better place for this.
    So, you're saying that dingle setups don't belong here either? What's next, a 10pg. dissertaion on the "proper" way to pedal?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt J View Post
    So, you're saying that dingle setups don't belong here either? What's next, a 10pg. dissertaion on the "proper" way to pedal?
    Well, maybe you need to write a 10 pg dissertation on why you insist that your multi-speed bike with on the fly shifting is still to be considered single speed..

    In my opinion single speed is about a certain mindset. You pick a gear for a trip and stick with it, no matter what. If the going gets tough, you pedal harder or walk. There is no need to consider gear ratios during a ride, because you only have one.

    Dingle speeds and flip-flops are a grey area. Again, it's about the mindset. If you use one gear going to the trail and another gear on the trail, I still consider it single speed because you pick a gear for the task and stick with it. However if you stop before every hill on the trail and flop the wheel over and flop it over again for the downhill part, it's not single speeding anymore, it's a geared bike with a really annoying shifting mechanism.

    Your bike looks like a fun project, but it isn't a single speed, not even remotely. It's a geared bike done in a new way. On the fly shifting defeats the whole idea of single speeding, it's a completely different mindset that you can just push a button and opt for an easier gear if the going gets too tough.

    Basically, if you look at a hill and think "uh, looks steep, I'd better pick another gear" you're not single speeding..

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