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  1. #1
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    Is there any parts of your trails that you can clear with 29" that you can't with 26"

    Just curious if there's any technical climbs or some sort of log bump run or something that you can't do on a 26" dia. SS but that you can on your 29".

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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay
    Just curious if there's any technical climbs or some sort of log bump run or something that you can't do on a 26" dia. SS but that you can on your 29".
    Would not say can not clean on the 26" bike but many of the log overs and such are much easier on the 29er.
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  3. #3
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    Not so far...only been riding the 29er for a short while though. I find technical climbs sometimes harder on the 29er than the 26. Also, lifting the front wheel over things is harder on the 29er due to the extra weight and geometry issues. Traction in turns and the ability to smooth out the trail with the 29er are great though.
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  4. #4
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    When approaching this ledge from the opposite direction it is easier with the bigger wheels, but definitely doable with the smaller.


    But this switch-back has a log on top of the ledge so there is no run-out, so it is easier with the shorter wheelbase, but again, it's doable on a 29'er.


    Some situations favor one over the other, but not so much that it can't be done.

  5. #5
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    Something I've picked up on over the last 2 + years is that I can routinely clean things on my 26er that gave me issues before I rode 29ers. Something about rolling through, and up/over, really tough obstacles on the 29er lets me know I can do it regardless of wheelsize. This confidence has definitely extended itself to my 26er rides as well. I still ride a 26" 1x1 fairly often, a lot more this time of year especially. I do not have issues with the transition between wheel sizes. Some of this may be due to the very neutral handling of the 1x1, or it could be the 16+ years of riding 26ers, I can't say for sure but I'm glad it's an easy switch.

    Lofting the front end up and over step up logs/rock faces is certainly different on the 29er. Once the muscle memory is developed though it's kind of an automatic thing (unless I just fell attempting something similar, then it's more work to override the last second bail out urges ). Some really bony, and slow, climbs are easier on the 26 due to the wheelbase, acceleration and maneuverability. On the 29er it becomes more work and an exercise in ample body english to clean the nasty bits.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CB2
    that looks slippy.

  7. #7
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    I've got a rigid at both ends Singular. The first time I had it out it romped over stuff I got stopped on on my Voodoo with a White fork. This is despite the Singular being geared about 2 teeth higher.
    It seemed to improve my riding because after that I was able to ride the stuff on the Voodoo.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay
    Just curious if there's any technical climbs or some sort of log bump run or something that you can't do on a 26" dia. SS but that you can on your 29".
    Yes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ionsmuse
    Yes.
    K - what type, why?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay
    K - what type, why?
    We've got a short, vaguely steep climb around here that's a wee bit sandy and filled with enough chunky rocks that one cannot hope to dodge all of them. Then, right before the top, there are two 4" roots, spaced just less than a normal bike wheelbase apart. On the wee bike, those dame roots got me every time. On the rigid Karate Monkey, it's tough but doable. The Levaithan makes it seem trivial.

    There's another hill close by with a tight switchback halfway up. The start of the climb is steep, rutted, and powdery so you have to put the pedal to the metal on a SS right away, and are nice and depleted when you get to the turn. Just as the radius of the turn is cleared by the front wheel you've got a 10" step up, at a weird angle, formed by a root. I never made that on the little bike, though not for lack of trying.

    I can also think of some XXXL log piles in Flagstaff and some ledges in Moab that are exponentially less terrifying to roll on the big wheels (presuming a rigid fork). I had also never cleaned some sand pits on Poison Spider or the entirety of Upheavel Dome wash on the White Rim until I got me a niner.

    Eh?

  11. #11
    CB2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ionsmuse
    the wee bike

    Eh?
    I'm no 29'er zealot, in fact the zealots made me resist the 29'er with their rants and their holier than thou attitude, but from now on I think I'm going to have to refer to a bike with 26" wheels as a "wee bike"!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ionsmuse
    We've got a short, vaguely steep climb around here that's a wee bit sandy and filled with enough chunky rocks that one cannot hope to dodge all of them. Then, right before the top, there are two 4" roots, spaced just less than a normal bike wheelbase apart. On the wee bike, those dame roots got me every time. On the rigid Karate Monkey, it's tough but doable. The Levaithan makes it seem trivial.

    There's another hill close by with a tight switchback halfway up. The start of the climb is steep, rutted, and powdery so you have to put the pedal to the metal on a SS right away, and are nice and depleted when you get to the turn. Just as the radius of the turn is cleared by the front wheel you've got a 10" step up, at a weird angle, formed by a root. I never made that on the little bike, though not for lack of trying.

    I can also think of some XXXL log piles in Flagstaff and some ledges in Moab that are exponentially less terrifying to roll on the big wheels (presuming a rigid fork). I had also never cleaned some sand pits on Poison Spider or the entirety of Upheavel Dome wash on the White Rim until I got me a niner.

    Eh?
    Disclaimer: I've never ridden a 29'er.

    I don't know your riding style or abilities and I'm sure that the 29'er can smooth out some obstacles, BUT I really have a hard time believing that the 29" wheels make more things passable. I say that because it would seem that, I'll use your second example, you could maybe work on some track stands or a small bit of trials skills to clear that small ledge.

    I would argue that maybe the 29'er makes things potentially easier, but it seems like it may be bandaiding some potential weaknesses. And I don't by any means want to indicate you're a weak or poor rider, but that just maybe with a few more skillsets you'd be clearing that ledge with ease.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88 rex
    Disclaimer: I've never ridden a 29'er.

    I don't know your riding style or abilities and I'm sure that the 29'er can smooth out some obstacles, BUT I really have a hard time believing that the 29" wheels make more things passable. I say that because it would seem that, I'll use your second example, you could maybe work on some track stands or a small bit of trials skills to clear that small ledge.

    I would argue that maybe the 29'er makes things potentially easier, but it seems like it may be bandaiding some potential weaknesses. And I don't by any means want to indicate you're a weak or poor rider, but that just maybe with a few more skillsets you'd be clearing that ledge with ease.
    This can be the case sometimes. If there's traction you can tech your way up stuff on a 26er, but the 29er will be able to make the same section easier to keep moving on. Also, on a single speed, drivetrain moves like you would make on a trials bike are much harder due to the steeper gear, so you're left with static hopping. Charging through using momentum and flow on the 29er just feels smoother. Now when it comes to loose, chaotic surfaces, the 29er definitely finds traction where the 26 won't.

  14. #14
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    rode a 26 inch bike again (first time in over a year) two nights ago and would have to say that it is a blast, made me want to build up a 1x1. climbed awesome, quick handling, i do like the bigger tires overall but i don't see 29er replacing 26 any time soon.

  15. #15
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    traction

    The things that I have cleaned on the 29er SS that I couldn't do on my 26 gearie I chalk up to the extra traction of the 29er footprint. Although, it could be the momentum thing of the SS vs the gearie...

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