Tell me why I should stay rigid...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Tell me why I should stay rigid...

    Every year, as I descend into the off-season with the long winter ahead and hours on the trainer to look forward to (not), I come up with ideas on what I'm going to do to my bike for the next year. More often than not, these ideas lead to big expenditures which I have to then justify to the family accountant (the wife) who holds the purse strings. I've had the Niner Carbon fork with the Niner Carbon bars for the past year and they have been superb, I mean I love the setup, the clean look, the handling, the light weight, the performance when I'm climbing and the compliance on the bumps. And not having to deal with maintenance, shock pumps, leakings seals, etc....
    My current obsession is putting a Lefty on my SIR9. This means buying the fork, the adapter and the wheel which is going to run at least $1100 mixing new and used components.
    My fear is that I'm going to spend the cash and time to purchase and assemble the project and then feel disgust on the first climb when I detect bobbing.
    So my SS brethren, convince me as to why I should stick with the rigid. Hit me with all you got!

  2. #2
    Bro
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    This should help you stay rigid.

    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by erik1245 View Post
    This should help you stay rigid.

    No good. After 4 hours, the ride becomes painful

  4. #4
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    consider the cost of a decent suspension fork. then consider the cost of replacing the seals, oil, etc, whether you DIY or pay a professional to service the fork. then consider the cost of a decent rigid fork. rigid is more fun (?) and costs a fraction of suspension parts.

  5. #5
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    For the same reasons I'm sticking with it after dabbling for a while and then seeing sense a couple of years back -

    All the added fun that *may* come frome gears and suspension does not offset the frustration at not being able to ride when you want due to technical malfunctions, or having a ride screwed up by technical malfunctions.

    Unless you live to 'pin it' and have DHer skills, suspension is a slippery slope to complexity where I-phone app enabled fork settings and electronic combined fork-and-post lockouts await, biding their time until unleashing a ride-killing dose of technical malfunction mayhem on you. Probably on the morning of potentially the best ride of the year. Except you'll never know it would've been the best or not, you'll be in the garage wondering what that clunk-suck/whoosh noise is or riding that great trail with your forks-of-mass-distraction clunking over every root.

  6. #6
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    I put a borrowed suspension fork, brake and wheel (all reasonably high end, Reba SL, nice DT-Swiss wheel with R Ralph tire) on my rigid bike for a long weekend a bit ago. It increased the weight of my bike 4 pounds! It completely sucked going up hill -- any hill -- and the claim that suspension helps climbing is completely wrong in my (limited) experience. The poor climbing might be mitigated by a bit better setup (bars were higher), but nothing is going to mitigate the weight increase. But the suspension fork definitely enhanced the downhill and cornering properties of my -- the front wheel was glued to the ground, particularly on off-camber sketchy corners. So I too will spend my winter wondering if a suspension fork is appropriate for my rigid bike...will the trade-offs be a net plus or a net minus? Tough to tell without a lot more time on a suspension fork, but the expense...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  7. #7
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    I have a Cannondale Rush and have been considering doing the swap. The Lefty 110mm Speed Carbon fork is silky smooth and light, but I think it would make me slower in a race since there is no lockout.

  8. #8
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    Im dealing with the same thing .I love rigid my main ride is a steel Jones with p35's
    and Dissents its heavy but so smooth.My race bike is a 19lb specialized with a DT swiss
    carbon fork I just picked up a nice used Reba to try out for the longer races I put it on last
    week and rode it a few times and dont think its my thing yaes its smoother but climbing & cornering is annoying.I have a 6 hour race in a few weeks maybe a big front tire like an
    FR3 or Ardent would be better.

  9. #9
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    go fat front. Still rigid, fun to build up and fun to ride.

    I did it and now my wife and I hang out at the lake holding hands in matching bathtubs while watching the sunset. How viagra helps me when we are in different tubs and have to run inside chilly cold to get somewhere more comfortable is beyond me but that is what fat front has done for me.

    Alternately go full fat, sell the trainer and ride outside in the snow. 3 birds with one stone, single speed, rigid and riding.
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  10. #10
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    I have a fat front in the garage I liked some things about it but alot I didnt.Thats what made me go to p35's & Dissents Its like almost fat or chubby!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by fixgeardan View Post
    I have a fat front in the garage I liked some things about it but alot I didnt.Thats what made me go to p35's & Dissents Its like almost fat or chubby!
    I too used the Dissents on SunMTX33 rims. Wide and tractiony but there is definitely a weight disadvantage. I think my fat front Larry actually rolls better than the dissent, although the Dissent definitely wins for sticky traction on rocks.

    I haven't had a ton of rides on my fat front but am looking forward to hitting some of the more technical rides we have here in AZ just to see what it is like.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by james-o View Post
    For the same reasons I'm sticking with it after dabbling for a while and then seeing sense a couple of years back
    They call this slumming

    I went from suspension to rigid, at first it was a tough move you notice a lot of the trail you never noticed before. Your muscle ache even more after a good ride, and your arms are tired. But even after all that the guys on the suspension are still behind me huffing up the hill. Seriously I have never been this fast on a bike in my life.

    I rode a lefty which is pretty light for a fork and I still dropped a solid pound off my bike, I also lowered the front end a bit and really liked the quicker handling it brought.

    If you really want a lefty hit me up I will sell you it with the project321 adapter and hub for half that, mine was for a 29er.

    EDIT: There is dude around here rolling Dissents front rear on a SS. I do not know how you guys do this that's like 6lbs of rubber!
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  13. #13
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    Im up in Prescott let me know if you want to come up and ride some tech stuff.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57 View Post
    They call this slumming

    I went from suspension to rigid, at first it was a tough move you notice a lot of the trail you never noticed before. Your muscle ache even more after a good ride, and your arms are tired. But even after all that the guys on the suspension are still behind me huffing up the hill. Seriously I have never been this fast on a bike in my life.

    I rode a lefty which is pretty light for a fork and I still dropped a solid pound off my bike, I also lowered the front end a bit and really liked the quicker handling it brought.

    If you really want a lefty hit me up I will sell you it with the project321 adapter and hub for half that, mine was for a 29er.

    EDIT: There is dude around here rolling Dissents front rear on a SS. I do not know how you guys do this that's like 6lbs of rubber!
    Its like training with a weighted vest!

  15. #15
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    I think you will miss the rigid fork as soon as you ride your SS with the squishy fork. I say the same thing to myself from time to time, and am afraid that over the winter I'll do something like put the same headset on my SS that's on my geared 29er so they can share forks. Good idea I guess, but I just don't want to go there. 30 min after I start riding my geared 29er, I instantly crave the light, flicky SS. Plus, it's amazing how much better you get by just riding anything on the SS. Did a nasty 1.25 mile descent on the SS 2 weekends ago, got over my head in speed, hit some embedded rocks hard, and then got amazingly smooth over the rest of the rough stuff for the rest of the ride. It's like muscle memory doesn't like the hits, so your body adapts super quickly. Good luck, but I'm going to try to keep mine rigid. Well, you know... as long as I can I guess. ???

  16. #16
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    $1100 is over half way to an air9.
    2011 Kona unit with some carbon.

  17. #17
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    SS is all about making climbs and a rigid fork provides a serious out of saddle climbing advantage. One could argue that a suspension fork allows greater speed and momentum as you approach the climb but once you slow to climbing speed the suspension is a liability.

    If the trails you ride are super long climbs, stay rigid. If the trails are rolling, flowy, with a few steep inclines here or there then consider suspension.

  18. #18
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    Fork dive.

    I put a suspension fork on my rigid after riding this way for seven years now. I hated the fork dive feeling on downhill switchbacks. I dumped several times. I went back to rigid after riding a full suspension for about five years, and like Rockcrusher, I've gone fat at least for the next six months. The Large Marge/Larry/Salsa Enabler setup with leftover parts set me back almost $300 but worth it, because I can switch back to a narrow rigid pretty quickly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tell me why I should stay rigid...-larry.jpg  


  19. #19
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    I have a 26 rigid SS. Love it. Thought i needed a suspended 29er. $1300 later i had a front suspension Niner and really prefer the SS. You won't know until you try it. Have fun.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57 View Post
    They call this slumming
    : ) that's part of what I liked about it- cheap, simple, put it away filthy.

    So now I have a Jones ti SS with XTR cranks and discs. Gets treated almost as badly but there's something nice about spending on the stuff that doesn't really wear out. Ti Truss fork or Kashima-coat 32s with travel adjust remote lock etc? Cost's the same, one will last without careful maintenance though.

    Spending money on good rigid stuff is an investment. 'Quality is remembered after the price is forgotten'..

    OP could buy some lovely custom forks and wheels for under $1100.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyb View Post
    Fork dive.

    I put a suspension fork on my rigid after riding this way for seven years now. I hated the fork dive feeling on downhill switchbacks. I dumped several times. I went back to rigid after riding a full suspension for about five years, and like Rockcrusher, I've gone fat at least for the next six months. The Large Marge/Larry/Salsa Enabler setup with leftover parts set me back almost $300 but worth it, because I can switch back to a narrow rigid pretty quickly.
    I rode yesterday and decided I'll stick with the rigid. It's just too much fun. Thanks for the offer MrPink! I was thinking hard about that. I like the fat front idea for the winter!

  22. #22
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    Welcome back, the beers in the fridge but the one in the garage not the one downstairs.
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  23. #23
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    I like that the rigid fork never needs rebuilding, is cheaper, and always performs the same (unlike a fork in need of servicing). I like the same things about a SS. A new drivetrain for a SS is about the same as that of a good 9 speed cassette (and could be much less depending upon one's choices).
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  24. #24
    miwuksurfer
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    I just switch from years on a 26" with 100mm front sus to 29er with carbon fork and handlebars and 2.4 ardent. I'm faster rigid. Up and down hill.

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