Is A Susp. Corrected Frame Better?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    59

    Is A Susp. Corrected Frame Better?

    Was wondering if y'all could comment on spec'ing a frame for a rigid fork only or compensated, say for a ~ 80mm, squishy fork.

    Assuming one would always run rigid, is there a benefit (or detriment) to having a compensated frame?

    Thanks for your thoughts and opinions!

    ssRR

  2. #2
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
    Reputation: Drevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,906
    Obviously with the non-corrected geometry, running a taller suspension fork makes things all wackity-wack, for lack of a better term. (Edit: it'll change the handling characteristics compared to the shorter rigid fork, which some people don't mind.)

    On a suspension-corrected geometry frame, you can run a suspension fork later with little detriment to the handling, but generally you get less standover height and higher handlebar position. The builder can adjust for this stuff with a shorter headtube and a steeper sloping top tube. You can also flip your stem for a negative rise (if that racy roadie look appeals to ya) and wear a cup.

    A suspension-corrected frame is the way to go if you think you'll dabble with squishy forks.
    Last edited by Drevil; 10-08-2004 at 03:44 PM.

  3. #3
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,659
    What Drevil said. If you're asking opinions, here's mine: I'd go with susp. corrected geometry and enjoy the knowledge that if I ever wanted to run front suspension, I'd have the option.

    I occasionally take the Fox 125RL off my Vulture and implant a Karate Monkey rigid fork in its place. The option is a nice one to have and adds nothing to the cost of the frame.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  4. #4
    Probably drunk right now
    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,749

    In addition....

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    What Drevil said. If you're asking opinions, here's mine: I'd go with susp. corrected geometry and enjoy the knowledge that if I ever wanted to run front suspension, I'd have the option.

    I occasionally take the Fox 125RL off my Vulture and implant a Karate Monkey rigid fork in its place. The option is a nice one to have and adds nothing to the cost of the frame.

    --Sparty
    I agree. I run a Marzocchi 100 mm fork but I also have the capability to run rigid. So a suspension corrected frame provides more practical versitility.

    Ken

  5. #5
    Derailleurs owned: 0
    Reputation: c0jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    354
    I think ssRR is saying that he will NEVER use a suspension fork.

    I'm the same way, a benefit I've found for suspension-corrected frame/fork is the ability to convert to 29er.
    -another is resale value.

    If I ever buy a custom frame, it will be a rigid-specific, disc-specific 29er w/EBB.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Halloween's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    76
    IMO, I'd get a suspension length rigid fork for two reasons, even if you never plan to go suspension.

    1) A longer rigid fork is apt to have more compliance due to greater fore-aft movement.

    2) You may break your wrist someday and have to run suspension. One never knows...

  7. #7
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,659
    Quote Originally Posted by c0jones
    I think ssRR is saying that he will NEVER use a suspension fork.

    I'm the same way, a benefit I've found for suspension-corrected frame/fork is the ability to convert to 29er.
    -another is resale value.

    If I ever buy a custom frame, it will be a rigid-specific, disc-specific 29er w/EBB.
    Never say never.

    Seriously, even people who are dead set against something at one point in their lives may find themselves open to the idea at a later time. Mine is the voice of experience (more times than I care to admit).

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  8. #8
    highly visible
    Reputation: GlowBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,179

    Give yourself the option!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Never say never.

    Seriously, even people who are dead set against something at one point in their lives may find themselves open to the idea at a later time. Mine is the voice of experience (more times than I care to admit).

    --Sparty
    I'm one of those people.

    I'd been dead set against suspension for several years, but then I got rear-ended and hurt my neck. Twice. I'm still hoping to achieve a 100% recovery, but many people with spinal injuries only recover 99%, and experience pain at least on occasion for the rest of their lives. It's quite possible that even years from now, the all-day rides that I love (and haven't done in well over a year) will still aggravate my injury unless I run suspension. Right now I'm very glad my Karate Monkey gives me the option. In fact, I'm shopping for suspension forks right now.

    And as already mentioned, it doesn't just give you the option to run suspension. It also gives you more options if you want to upgrade your rigid fork, since most come suspension-corrected now. It gives you the option to run a 29" front wheel, should you someday decide it's a good idea. And it gives you better resale value. Go suspension corrected.

    - Dan
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 10-08-2004 at 08:37 PM.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dodjy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    478
    Quote Originally Posted by ssRoughRider
    Was wondering if y'all could comment on spec'ing a frame for a rigid fork only or compensated, say for a ~ 80mm, squishy fork.

    Assuming one would always run rigid, is there a benefit (or detriment) to having a compensated frame?

    Thanks for your thoughts and opinions!

    ssRR
    Compensate for a suspension fork, keep your options open. Or, don't worry and just ride. If your riding style is more than one-dimensional, an 80mm suspension fork on a non-suspension corrected frame will not hinder you.

    dd..''

  10. #10
    Derailleurs owned: 0
    Reputation: c0jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    354

    Good point...

    When I bought my P.1 and D.I.S.S. frames, I had no intention to ever use them as singlespeeds. I was just looking for the ideal frame for internally geared hubs. I have since seen the light.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Never say never.

    Seriously, even people who are dead set against something at one point in their lives may find themselves open to the idea at a later time. Mine is the voice of experience (more times than I care to admit).

    --Sparty

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    59

    Thanks For Your Insights!! (nm) -ssRR

    Thanks everyone for your insights. Much appreciated!!!

    ssRR

  12. #12
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,236
    Quote Originally Posted by ssRoughRider
    Was wondering if y'all could comment on spec'ing a frame for a rigid fork only or compensated, say for a ~ 80mm, squishy fork.

    Assuming one would always run rigid, is there a benefit (or detriment) to having a compensated frame?

    Thanks for your thoughts and opinions!

    ssRR
    I would have the frame designed for at least a 100mm susy fork and have a custom rigid fork made. The "corrected" rigid fork will have more tire and mud clearance that a non-corrected fork so you can use anything you want. I can easily run a Gazzaloddi 3.0 in my Karate Monkey fork with room to spare.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

Similar Threads

  1. Bought a frame with a crack
    By MegaVolt in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 06-18-2009, 11:51 AM
  2. What did my 88 Fat Chance sell for new?
    By mojo in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-20-2005, 02:26 PM
  3. Besides less weight, why do people buy XC frames?
    By BudhaGoodha in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: 08-30-2004, 10:53 PM
  4. comparison of ProPedal, Float and ALPS on same frame
    By ccm in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-15-2004, 08:37 AM
  5. what is lightest 4" horst dual susp frame?
    By ccm in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 01-23-2004, 02:34 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.