stand over height- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    TANSTAAFL
    Reputation: addictionms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    402

    stand over height

    I have started looking at getting a SS, and I have looked at a Salsa Juan Solo, Titus FCR, and a Stumpjumper HT as frames, so here is my quesiton, I ride an XL Stumpjumper FSR and an XL Epic FSR today and it seems the standover height of the HT is really tall in the XL sizing.

    I am 6'3" and wear a 35" inseam, so I think I need to be on an XL, but at the average of a 33" standover it seems really tall.....

    I am missing something?

    Jim
    "It is a bad sign when people stop identifying themselves with the county and start identifying with a group."

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    238
    I recently went through this as well, having been out of MTB'ing for a number of years, and coming from the non-sloped top tube variety of MTB which was the only game in town in the old days (in the old days you sized a MTB alot like a road bike, and you paid for it off road).

    I'm 6'0 tall with a 33" inseam and I chose an 18" Haro Mary, with a 31.8 standover and it's functionally perfect, even with the stock length seat tube.

    Plenty of reach as well.

    The only thing I can say is try the 'L' too..

    The seat to handle bar length is critical. You need enough room there, and it's adjustment is limited to sliding the seat forward or aft.

    Whereas if you go for more clearance above the top tube by choosing a smaller frame, seat height is an easy thing to solve with a longer seat tube if necessary.

    Larger frames make roading easier, smaller frames are easier to flick around and handle off road. It's somewhat a compromise. And choosing the best compromise involves considering what type of riding you're most likely to do..

    Therefore I would say if you do more off road type stuff, consider getting the 'L' (if there's enough seat to handbar adjustment).. If you do more on road, or cruiser type riding the 'XL' may seem like a more comfortable choice, although you may find yourself reaching too much, even with your seat slid all the way forward. And off road, you may find the 'XL' handles more like a road bike and is far too close to the jewels for comfort.

    This is the best frame sizer out there, and according to your inseam measurement you need a 19" frame mountain bike. Check it out. It helped me greatly in choosing my current frame size and I can attest to its accuracy.

    http://www.totalbike.com/service/frame_size.php



    --------

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,667
    Focus more on ETT than standover.

  4. #4
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,631
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Focus more on ETT than standover.
    +1

    on a side note.... i like to run ny rigid SS rig slightly on the larger side....makes it easier to *crawl* all over the bike on hard uphill grunts...my .02

    PS - to the OP....just grab a Surly......all-around solid frame
    Click Here for Forum Rules

  5. #5
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,818
    Top tube length is first, seat tube second.

    I'm 6'3" tall, 37" inseam. 37" sleeve. All arms and legs, with a very short torso; because of that, I want a shorter top tube, so I ride smaller frames. I have a 20" Inbred 29er (18" c-c) termed a large size, with 33" stand over; they make a 21" that would have too long a top tube for me.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  6. #6
    organically fed
    Reputation: w00t!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,175
    WTF is ETT?
    <------n00b

  7. #7
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,818
    Effective Top Tube. A theoretical horizontal tube from the head tube to seat tube; actual seat tubes slope at different angles and make comparisons tough. ETT measurements all real comparisons between different frame designs.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: john_mcdonough's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    97
    Focus on the ETT and then look for a frame with a sloped top tube to protect the jewels. As one person told me:

    "how many times have you stood over a bike and said, if I had an extra quarter inch, I could avoid racking myself. If you are going to rack yourself, you are going to rack yourself."

  9. #9
    organically fed
    Reputation: w00t!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,175
    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Effective Top Tube. A theoretical horizontal tube from the head tube to seat tube; actual seat tubes slope at different angles and make comparisons tough. ETT measurements all real comparisons between different frame designs.
    Awesome.

    Thanks. 'Preciate the information.

    Bye,

    w00t!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.