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Thread: SS Springbike

  1. #1
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    SS Springbike

    I just finished the build on my new SS. I have had this frame for a long time and wanted to turn it into something that I would ride and wanted a SS to have something different (for me).

    I decided to leave the small chainring on for 2 reasons besides it was already there. One is that it will catch the chain if it falls off to the inside and also I thought I might like to have one lower gear if the trail is too steep for the 34-20. I also have an 18 tooth it the 20 turns out to be too low.

    I have only gotten to ride the bike around the yard so I don't know how it will work on a trail but it feels pretty good. There is a steep 4 foot transition at the front to the street so I can ride up that as a test. It worked great in the big ring but when I kicked it down to the small 24 tooth ring (with my foot while riding) as I would hit the transition on power as soon as the rear suspension compressed it felt like I would skip a tooth. Maybe because there isn't enough chain wrap on the rear cog or there is too little chain tension. My chain line is a little bit to the outside of the of the big ring but that is as far in board as I can get the rear cog with the Spot ss conversion kit. I was going to try and set it up to the middle of the front rings but I would have to use regular spacers to get that or machine down the large inner Spot spacer.

    At the moment I'm just going to ride in the big gear and deal with the small one later. I was just wondering if anyone had any bright ideas. Do you think a double pulley tension-er like the Paul Melvin would help any? I have my chain as tight as it will go with the current set up and the tension-er as preloaded as possible.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails SS Springbike-rsz_dsc02245.jpg  

    SS Springbike-rsz_dsc02247.jpg  

    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  2. #2
    Out spokin'
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    Wow, blast from the past. Cool.

    Personally I wonder if you'd be better served by a good ol' rear derailleur (or a Melvin, yeah, but why spend that much when the former works as well).

    Have fun,
    sParty
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    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  3. #3
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    As Sparty said, get a two pulley system if you want to drop down to the smaller chainring. That tensioner cannot handle that much chain wrap.

    Sweet frame.

  4. #4
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    I messed around with several rear suspension SS set-ups (Rush, Scalpel and Rize) and was never really able to get it dialed in to my satisfaction. What ended up working best was a SS ring up front and a small road cassette in the rear (11-21), a short cage road deraillier and a thumbie shifter. It was pretty inconspicuous and cheap because I had the spare parts already.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel
    I messed around with several rear suspension SS set-ups (Rush, Scalpel and Rize) and was never really able to get it dialed in to my satisfaction. What ended up working best was a SS ring up front and a small road cassette in the rear (11-21), a short cage road deraillier and a thumbie shifter. It was pretty inconspicuous and cheap because I had the spare parts already.

    Thanks for the input but that is sort of what happened to me about 10 years ago when I tried the ss thing for the first time since I was a kid. But that was on a steep, hardtail, limited travel front fork bike. It just didn't work very well in the rough so I kept adding back gears to make it somewhat rideable. It finally ended up as a street commuter 8 speed bike with a downtube shifter.

    I have other very functional bikes to ride so this is just a play bike and an alternative bike that utilized what was laying around in the basement for the most part except for some dedicated ss parts and I'm hoping that having the suspension will make it easier to keep momentum going as that is a lot of the trick to riding with no gearing choices I understand. The second chainring was an afterthought. So if I put a road cluster on it that kind of works I might as well put an off road cluster on there so that it really works.

    Even though the small cluster and road derailleur would look kind of cool I'm trying to avoid that.

    Also who knows I might end up joining the ss club if I like it
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  6. #6
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    Had the first ride on the new/old bike today. It was a lot of fun and everything worked fine. Having suspension made it a lot easier to keep up the momentum.

    The silent running thing is really cool. Have a Deore rear hub so that is silent too.

    Looking forward to the next few days of a little warmer weather to ride it some more.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  7. #7
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    cool

    That thing is awesome. I love the red Michelins - had totally forgotten about them - I rocked them back in 2003-4.

    No disrespect intended, but that's a super-mullet! 8 inch disc in front and a CANTI in the back - rad!
    Ride.

  8. #8
    CB2
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    What kind of cranks are those?
    I think you'll find the 44" gear you've got on there capable for all but the steepest climbs once you get the hang of SS. You might even find it too spinny.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSingleGuy
    That thing is awesome. I love the red Michelins - had totally forgotten about them - I rocked them back in 2003-4.

    No disrespect intended, but that's a super-mullet! 8 inch disc in front and a CANTI in the back - rad!
    "Super mullet" lol. I was wondering when someone would notice that. I needed a cable brake and the BB7 w/ 203 was on sale for $49 so I took it. I might get an adapter later to go with 160. I have plenty of 160 rotors laying around. But for now the 203 is fine and only a 65g weight penalty.

    I was suspect of the canti on the back having not run one for years but except for the pain in the ars setting it up compared with discs the WTB works really well and is pretty well balanced with the front considering the whole 70%-30% braking force balance thing. I'm also trying to stay off the brakes as much as possible to keep momentum.

    Yeah had those tires hanging around. They hook up ok and I really like the red with the red. I'm not even bothering to set them up tubeless.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CB2
    What kind of cranks are those?
    I think you'll find the 44" gear you've got on there capable for all but the steepest climbs once you get the hang of SS. You might even find it too spinny.
    Those are Morati Ti cranks. Had my old neighbor's parents pick them up for me over there when they came to visit about 8 years ago from the Czech Republic. Nice of them hey?

    Yeah for most stuff that gearing seems fine. I have an 18 too and if I get stronger or more used to the ss thing I might switch it out. Plus I think I will order that Melvin so I can use my 24 inner for really steep stuff. Shifting down to it is just a tap of the toe so the only hassle comes from having to stop and put it back up by hand. If it gives it too much slack and I start t get chain slap again I will probably just stick with one gear, but since I need a tensioner anyhow bc of the rear suspension I might as well try it.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

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