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Thread: SS Set-Up

  1. #1
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    SS Set-Up

    General question about setting up my SS.

    Is their a reason why many SSr's have a more upright set-up? Has anyone tried a lower more aggressive set-up? I figure the upright setup has to do with climbing, but since I live in Florida it is really not a problem.

    And, what are the handlebars all so wide? I hear this too is for climbing (leverage) and again in FLA this doesn't really seem necessary but does cause a bit of tree branch trimming on occasion with me ending up on the ground.

    I went to a mtb race recently and the SSr's were all upright and the geared guys many down low....I am tempted to get a negative rise stem and trim my handlebars even more,
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    An upright position allows you to move around on the climbs. It is also more comfortable out of the saddle. As for wide bars, you got it: leverage.

    For yourself, use what works for you. There's no fashion police. Run bar ends on risers, its all cool.

    -Rob.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by robcycle
    . There's no fashion police. -Rob.
    But wearing a "wife beater" during a race may get REAL police interested in you.

    Personally I don't see any reason to set up a SS bike any differently than a multispeed bike.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  4. #4
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    Wide bars....

    Give you more leverage on climbs. Sort of like bar ends. They also allow you to negotiate rough terrain better.


    Up right posture. Most single speeders are getting their power from out of the saddle hammering so the need for a lower - more powerful, while seated - position probably isn't as important. Personally, I keep my position a bit more stretched out on my SS as compared to my FS trail bike. I only stand on my SS when I have to. I find I burn out too quickly when standing.

  5. #5
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    less wrist-thrashing on rigid forks

  6. #6
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    My SS and geared bikes have virtually the same setup. Right now they even have the same handlebar, except the SS has bar ends.

    But I don't quite see how an upright setup helps in climbing. If anything, when climbing, I don't want the handlebar to be too high or too close.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
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  7. #7
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    My handlebar used to be lower. I had to be standing but reaching down at the same time. This was very uncomfortable and tiring for me. I was struggling to keep my butt back for traction.

    With the higher bar, I can almost stand up when standing up.

    Ali

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    You could get a off-road drop bar and get the best of both.

  9. #9
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    I run a fashion faux pas... I have a riser bar AND bar ends.
    Graeme Hunt Design - www.graemehuntdesign.com

  10. #10
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    whatever works for you.
    I personally like a lot of drop to the bars; on my 29'er I have to run the stem upside down to get even close to where I want the bars.

  11. #11
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    I run a slight riser bar with a negative stem

  12. #12
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    I ride a narrow zero rise bar with small bar ends. It is almost the exact same set up as my C'dale Rush. Low and narrow puts me in a comfortable position for climbing. Wider and higher is nicer for descending, but I can gain more time by being comfortable on a climb then on a descent. Just pick what is more comfortable for you.
    "Don't take life too serious. You'll never get out alive."

  13. #13
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    I'm running a 90mm stem, 10 degrees maybe? I found it in my parts bin and I'm too lazy to measure. Perched on the end of it is a Soma Noah's Arc. Narrow, flat, with a little bit of sweep. The riding position is low and aggressive (as you say) and the bar is fairly narrow, like riding a flat bar, but the sweep helps the wrists. I recommend it.

    http://somafab.com/arcbar.html

  14. #14
    (Ali)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    You could get a off-road drop bar and get the best of both.
    I considered drop bars at the time; but they didn't work with my Juicy 7 brakes. I looked at many options and finally decided to go with the Mary bars.

    Ali

  15. #15
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    I run a 10 degree rise stem with a riser bar turned upside down with bar ends.... (LOL)

    What ever works for you, just don't be wearing a wife beater. Yo.
    Bike Building and Painting

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by duotone
    ..........just don't be wearing a wife beater. Yo.
    I believe you are seeing the wider bars and rise not so much for climbing, but rather to aid in lower back pain while moving trailers from one trailer park to the next. This is also why there is an influx of wife beater wearing bikers. He did say he is in FL!

  17. #17
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    Since I wear 80's and 90's neon road spandex occasionally I feel most qualified to point out fashion faux pas

    We've all spotted the wife beater, but since when is wearing a baseball cap under the helmet correct for singlespeeding? Visit your LBS and cough up the money for a helmet visor.
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    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caffeine Powered
    We've all spotted the wife beater, but since when is wearing a baseball cap under the helmet correct for singlespeeding?
    Dont'cha know? That's "FLA punk rock!"

  19. #19
    Sweep the leg!
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    Quote Originally Posted by long hazy daze
    Dont'cha know? That's "FLA punk rock!"

    you kidz these days
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  20. #20
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    i rock a flat bar with bar ends on all my bikes, i never really use the bar ends but they serve a purpose as bark busters. i tried out a wide riser bar once and it was definitely more comfortable but it slowed down the steering too much and I like to ride with my weight farther forward.
    99 GF Big Sur SS 32x16
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  21. #21
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    As far as bars go, I have a flat bar, bar ends, and negative rise stem on the 26" SS, and risers, stem at the bottom of the steerer tube, and bar ends on the 29er. I also have Gary's on the fixed cross bike, and I think I'm going to put some Midges on the 29er when I get the dough.

    I tend to prefer a more stretched out riding position with my hands much closer to parallel to the bike than perpendicular. I blame it on countless days of commuting on drops and bullhorns

    -Rob.

  22. #22
    Exclusively Single
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    My 700mm wide risers are about 1.5" above my saddle height. I love it. I ride for fun. I don't race and I don't kid myself.

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