SS Ridged or F. Suspension Which and why?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm SS Ridged or F. Suspension Which and why?

    I know another redundant question? However we all have different reasons. I perfer a suspension fork because it eats the big stuff. Why do you use the fork you ride?

  2. #2
    Making fat cool since '71
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    Since I run on limited funds...my SS is also my part-time dirtjumper/urban thing so I have a 2006 Z1 light on it with the travel wound down to 5". That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

    Brock...
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  3. #3
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    Rigid - because I want my bikes as simple as possible and I'm oldsschool.

  4. #4
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    Thats a great answer. Say what you mean and mean what you say

  5. #5
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    rigid. I feel like if Im already riding a steel singlespeed I might as well carry that through and ride a rigid fork. Also, I'm young enough to have not collected many injuries that would bother me during a harsh ride. They say it helps for climbing too but I have no personal experience with that.

    I already see how this is going to play out. One day I'll feel like I need a little smoother ride and buy a suspension fork, then I might get a 5 speed hub, then maybe a 1x9, and Ill end up as an old man spinning a granny gear up a fire road on a full suspension 27 geared bike.

  6. #6
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    That sounds about right..

  7. #7
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    I ride rigid. It took awhile, but I realized that a suspension fork didn't increase my speed anywhere. To be honest, I'm more than a little afraid of speed -- I get to some speed (dependent on terrain, fitness, freshness, and general level of anxiety) and I just don't want to go any faster, and that upper limit is not set by the lack of suspension. So I figure why should I carry the extra weight up hills? My ride time is not limited by arm or back fatigue, so a shock wouldn't do me any good there. Finally, I like a quick handling bike and the small offset of most suspension forks (corrected now on some of the newer models) would require a much too steep of a head angle on the frame, so I went with a custom fork to get the handling I desired.
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  8. #8
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    Rigid. It feels better on climbs. My local trails only go up and up and up. I also don't need to mess around with a lock out.

    I still ride my geared front suspension bike and feel spoiled when I'm on it but the SS gets most of the seat time.

  9. #9
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    I prefer rigid. Lighter and less hassle.

    If you're looking for the ultimate in downhill speed maybe a suspension fork would be better.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57║36' Highlands, Scotland

  10. #10
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    Suspension fork on a 26" hard tail. The newer forks are really getting good (light weight, durable, lockout etc), I just find myself enjoying the ride more with a suspension fork (and as large a volume tire as will fit). When I started riding there were no suspension forks we all rode rigid. Then I got a Manitou 2 and currently use a 2009 SID Team on my SS and a 2008 Reba on my 1x9.

    Maybe if I had smooth single track to ride I would go for a rigid fork but it is roots, rocks and mud so I'll take some cush.



    PS I also use a USE Shoxpost on my rides.

  11. #11
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    Rigid is the way to go on a SS I used to ride a full suspension because I had bad back and my buddy talked me into going ss and I never rode the FS again.My first ss was a c-dale 1fg and I never locked the fork out.I was amazed from going from fs to hardtail how much was lost in the suspension.One day I finally locked the fork out and I was like holly cow what took me so long to do this.Now I just built up a ss 29er with a carbon fork and love it.What ever you put inot the bike you get out,and the ride is great.I do evrything I used to do with no problems.

  12. #12
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    Just to add a bit more. I'm faster downhill with a suspension fork, but the downhills are over really quickly. I did a comparison recently on a long downhill - 5mins with suspension, just under 6 with rigid. The same height has to be regained by climbing - I'll more than make up the time lost on the rigid fork in the climb. Even if I was superfast on the downhill and did it in zero time, the better climbing with the lighter rigid makes up for it.

    Maybe if you're racing you would go for a fork with a lockout, but I prefer the simplicity of the rigid.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57║36' Highlands, Scotland

  13. #13
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Rumor has it that ladies prefer rigid over squish.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Rumor has it that ladies prefer rigid over squish.
    Well a remote lockout would be a fine thing then
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57║36' Highlands, Scotland

  15. #15
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    Rigid....

    Riding rigid is different. Not better or worse, just different. You need to handle your bike much differently with no suspension. I have a FS gearie that I ride, well, like a FS gearie. When I move over to the SS I want a totally different game. If I had only one bike, a SS, I may consider putting a suspension fork on it, mostly because that way it would be a more all-around-bike and allow me to keep up with the guys on tricked out FS rigs. Riding full rigid and keeping up with the geared duallies on rough, steep, rocky terrain is tough.

  16. #16
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    Suspension and no guilt

    My SS is my only bike so I like to have the suspension available for certain trails. Eventually I will buy a rigid fork fork and second crown race to switch back and forth

  17. #17
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    Suspension here!

    I have tried the whole rigid thing, and it's just not for me. I'm 30 now and will never ride a rigid again! Just to teeth-jarring for me.

    On the other hand, I give mad respect to the guys who ride rigid.

  18. #18
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    It depends on the time of year for me. In winter a lot of the trails round here are pretty soft and boggy anyway, so a suspension fork doesn't make that much difference and although I do ride a lot of technical stuff it's mostly at lowish speeds (because it's pretty tight and steep) and here one advantage of the rigid fork is no brake dive and predictable geometry.
    Plus, cleaning is easier and maintenance practically non existant.

    In the summer (if we get one - we're talking the British Isles here remember) I'll sometimes swap to suspension forks - just for a change mostly, but also because the trails are harder and dryer (well, maybe....).
    For me, I'd say rigid 75% of the time and if I had to, I'd quite happy for it to be 100%.
    You learn to live (and ride) with what you've got.

  19. #19
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    My main ss has some F100X forks on the front. I had a cheapie (Trek Mountain Cycle 850 I think) steel fully rigid bike first, but when I'd do longer rides and team 24hr rides, I just found the back and wrists got too beat up. The new frame is a much better frame (steel & geo wise), and probably would be better than the trek for pain etc (as in less). But, with these forks on it, it's just a dream to ride.

    I have a 29er ss with no forks (Kona Unit 2-9), but I've not ridden it properly yet, so don't know how that's going to turn out.

    Heavy forks that bounce, would suck, but if you can get some nice forks (to me the F100X is the ultimate xc ss fork), then they can really improve the enjoyment.

  20. #20
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    I ride both.
    I am faster on the hardtail, which is actually lighter than the rigid, but I enjoy both. This time of year I prefer the rigid with all the mud, slush, snow, and ice. I have the rigid set up fixed now too.


  21. #21
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    Nice bikes. I like the lines of the black HT.

  22. #22
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    Suspension

    I live in a VERY rocky & rooty area and I prefer to have the suspension to take the edge off.
    If it means anything I run my fork really stiff.
    this space left intentionally blank

  23. #23
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    Anyone who has been out riding in the Vegas area knows how extremely rocky it is out here. Because of this I ride with a suspension fork. I think that if I lived in an area that was smoother (like tahoe where I came from) I would go full rigid on my SS and leave the squish for my 1x9.

  24. #24
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    both?

    Rigid currently, but I just threw some money at a suspension fork and I'll take both forks with me to the trail. With a crown race on each fork and v-brakes set up on each, I should be able to switch out really quick (under 5 mins). There is a crazy amount of different riding conditions around where I live.. Rigid is the 75% choice, but there are some pretty techie trails that I just prefer a little squish.

  25. #25
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    The place where I have the most trouble with a suspension fork is on rocky/rooty technical slow stuff. I seem to have a propensity for sticking my wheel into deep holes and then the fork dives down and I come to a crashing halt. With a rigid fork I don't have this trouble, and I avoid it on the suspension fork by using the lockout.

    It's something I should sort out with a bit of practise I suppose, but seeing as I can do it using the rigid, I never get round to it.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57║36' Highlands, Scotland

  26. #26
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    If I am rocking a Reba with lockout, is that like semi-erect or partially suspended. Count for both!

  27. #27
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    Rigid for me. Simple like the drivetrain

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J
    Riding rigid is different. Not better or worse, just different. You need to handle your bike much differently with no suspension. I have a FS gearie that I ride, well, like a FS gearie. When I move over to the SS I want a totally different game. If I had only one bike, a SS, I may consider putting a suspension fork on it, mostly because that way it would be a more all-around-bike and allow me to keep up with the guys on tricked out FS rigs. Riding full rigid and keeping up with the geared duallies on rough, steep, rocky terrain is tough.
    This is almost my thoughts exactly. I have a FS gearie that i love and rode most through the summer. After switching to a different frame (one that actually fits) I have ridden my single speed probably 5 rides to 1 on the gearie. Could be new bike syndrome, or it could be that its nice to be riding something different. My singlespeed cost me maybe $30 in parts i didnt have laying around, v brakes, rims i won at a race about 5 years ago (red ano rims i HAD to put on something) and $20 for BOTH hubs off ebay. The frame is an old steel marin that i managed to bend back to straight after I was hit by a car on it so its defintally not anything blingy that making me like the bike so much...i just do.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by baycat
    If I am rocking a Reba with lockout, is that like semi-erect or partially suspended. Count for both!
    Good point! Now that I think about it, I will never ride a SS without a lockout. Don't know if you have a poplock but it is a much better convenience to have!

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