SS racers......a question for you....- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    SS racers......a question for you....

    Do you train on a road bike? I just ditched my gears and started racing SS. Do you find riding a road bike to be benificial, or a set back? I was doing training rides on the rd bike for endurance ect when I was racing geared classes. I hate riding them.........

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by fattirebliss
    Do you train on a road bike? I just ditched my gears and started racing SS. Do you find riding a road bike to be benificial, or a set back? I was doing training rides on the rd bike for endurance ect when I was racing geared classes. I hate riding them.........
    Everything counts.

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  3. #3
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    only if you ride like this guy...

    <iframe title="YouTube video player" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/5z1fSpZNXhU?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  4. #4
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    I wish I rode like that guy.....he is an animal! I wasn't sure if it is a good thing switching between gears and SS all the time.......I love riding SS
    Becky

  5. #5
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    Ok, new favorite video!

    I put in 16 miles (well 14 of it) on the road yesterday on my SS w/ my normal summer tires on it (Nano Raptor rear and Maxxis Ikon front) yesterday. But it's the only bike I had and the wife let me dip out for a ride while up at the in-laws so I wasn't going to pass up the opportunity.

    Honestly, I think it is a great way to train in the off season for sure or when ever the trails are mucked up. Intervals and hill climbing will definitely help you out. Fixed gear isn't bad either and can be picked up or built for pretty cheap (though you already have a bike).

  6. #6
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    Road bikes are good for when the trails are too wet and for just changing up the pace. In the winter months I'll do 4-5 rides/ week on my road bike and around 2 on my ss, usually night rides. In the spring and summer it's vice versa with the road bike usually for a weekly group ride with local road racers or a long weekend ride. Then ss the rest of the time.

    If you have a good training program and know what your doing then I think you can get by racing only training on ss.

  7. #7
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    just get on a bike... it's all good.

  8. #8
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    for me: more miles = more gooder.

    I have a geared road bike when I want to get out and do longer miles (>50 miles) but I have a SS road bike for my daily commute (22.5 mile round trip). I think they both help with my speed on the SS mtb, but I really feel that for me I just need a ton of time in the saddle. I mostly do endurance events though, so short distance stuff may be different.
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  9. #9
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    Thanks for the replies I do a lot of 18 to 20 mile races, and a lot of 24 hour races, too.....I am breaking into my first solo on my singlespeed in July for 12 hours at Dark..I agree that just hours on any bike at a time helps a ton!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fattirebliss
    Do you train on a road bike? I just ditched my gears and started racing SS. Do you find riding a road bike to be benificial, or a set back? I was doing training rides on tphe rd bike for endurance ect when I was racing geared classes. I hate riding them.........

    I get out on the road bike occasionly but never enuff.....Lake Mary Rd. is sweet right now and most of the trails are open for business in the Coco NF.Gears are good but I prefer uno speed on the durt.

  11. #11
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    I've been training a lot on my road bike this spring and I hate it too but it's been a necessity. We are getting ready for a long race in Fruita and I would be worn out if I was doing all my training miles on my SS. But I also don't want to spend too much time on my road bike because it kind of spoils me with all those gears back there.

  12. #12
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    Riding my fixed roadie has helped me quite a bit on my SS mtb. I try to get as much road time as possible. It's also easier to just ride to/from the home than driving to the trail. I'd like to get a Big Dummy so I can road ride to the trail, ride the trail, then Dummy it home.

  13. #13
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    It will be beneficial to your racing only if you're racing a singlespeed 29er. If you're racing 26" ss, then no.

  14. #14
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    I am racing on a Niner

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmxer
    It will be beneficial to your racing only if you're racing a singlespeed 29er. If you're racing 26" ss, then no.
    Um.....no.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by fattirebliss
    I am racing on a Niner
    Then of course it will help! It's been raining here in the midwest nearly nonstop for a while now, so my only training option is to try to ride on the road between the showers. Today got the first 25 miles in dry with the last 15 in the pouring rain.
    Still better than no ride at all!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmxer
    It will be beneficial to your racing only if you're racing a singlespeed 29er. If you're racing 26" ss, then no.
    700x23c road tires closer to 26" in diameter than most 26" mtb tires

  18. #18
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    I think any riding will help you train for racing. Riding gears will not hurt you when you go back to the SS. Some people train with gears and race SS. I have a geared CX race bike and a SS 29er. They both work well for me and it isn't hard to switch between them.

    If you like riding your MTB more period, then just ride it on or off road. I find my 29er to be more comfortable than my CX bike, so I've been riding it on the road a bit. It's geared for steep trail riding, so I spin a lot and get no where fast..but it roles pretty quick.

  19. #19
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    The geared road bike is good for volume, or specific workouts, but I find for the type of races I typically do a fixed gear is more beneficial.
    Here's why:
    If I'm riding my geared road bike I will not be climbing in as tall a gear. I suppose I could, but in practice I won't. 2/3s of the races I do (and would rather do) have me out of the saddle grinding up hills. I need to keep that muscle group strong.
    There are other races where you need to be able to stay on top of a large gear seated where training on a road bike might be quite handy, but I don't really target those, and do them purely for fun and out of convenience.

  20. #20
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    absolutely.
    IMO it's much easier to train for fitness on a road bike then on my local trails.
    now if you need training for technical skill, obviously not.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by vaultbrad
    only if you ride like this guy...

    Or this one:


  22. #22
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    Why does road bike imply gears? Did 55 miles today on this rig. Rained for about 45 minutes of that which was less than I was expecting.

    I would like to say from a physiology aspect, road riding won't build strength like SSing on trails will. But it will build endurance so if your trails lack steep climbs then great, you'll be able to climb them all day due to the road saddle time you put in.


  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bennymack
    Why does road bike imply gears? Did 55 miles today on this rig. Rained for about 45 minutes of that which was less than I was expecting.

    I would like to say from a physiology aspect, road riding won't build strength like SSing on trails will. But it will build endurance so if your trails lack steep climbs then great, you'll be able to climb them all day due to the road saddle time you put in.
    who said anything about gears?
    your bike is cool and all, but that's quite a stretch just to post a photo. i'm glad you're proud of it & yourself.
    it's easier to control your heart rate on the road, which is typically smoother, both in texture and transition, than the trails i ride. the roads around here also have higher sustained grades than many of the trails, since we don't have mountains and many trails follow greenbelts along creeks and streams.
    it is also easier to log many more hours on a road bike, since you are getting much less fatigued from the trail.
    i specifically said training for fitness (endurance), which is a part of racing.
    Last edited by meltingfeather; 04-27-2011 at 07:51 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather
    who said anything about gears?
    your bike is cool and all, but that's quite a stretch just to post a photo. i'm glad you're proud of it & yourself.
    it's easier to control your heart rate on the road, which is typically smoother, both in texture and transition, than the trails i ride. the roads around here also have higher sustained grades than many of the trails, since we don't have mountains and many trails follow greenbelts along creeks and streams.
    i specifically said training for fitness (endurance), which is a part of racing.
    You seem to have mistakenly thought my post was directed at you. Rest assured, your comments were in no way related to anything I said. Just wanted to point that out. I have zero interest in an Internet argument whatsoever. Others seemed to mention geared road bikes as if the one implied the other.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bennymack
    You seem to have mistakenly thought my post was directed at you. Rest assured, your comments were in no way related to anything I said. Just wanted to point that out. I have zero interest in an Internet argument whatsoever. Others seemed to mention geared road bikes as if the one implied the other.
    i guess cuz you mistakenly replied to my post?
    no sweat. sorry for the confusion
    Last edited by meltingfeather; 04-27-2011 at 08:19 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  26. #26
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    also, I don't think I could ride a bike I hated. that would prolly be enough for me to sell it. I have a ton o fun on my roadie. whole different world...
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  27. #27
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    There is no better base training for conditioning than geared road riding. Let's you isolate and target your training in a way that SS or even geared MTBing really can't, or usually can't, or cannot easily, anyway. Can you race SS and be competitive without road training? Perhaps, depending on lots of factors, but it would definitely be the exception to the rule. I race Open SS and spend most of my training time on a road bike before the season, then kinda shift to more MTB. MTB'ing is more for 'practice', or pure enjoyment. I LOVE LOVE LOVE MTB'ing, but I road ride a lot simply for the most effective training to make me competitive against some tough competition. But I also don't "hate" road riding, either. But if you wanna win, you either gotta be a freak of nature, or spend some quality time on a road bike, IMHO. ymmv

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather
    absolutely.
    IMO it's much easier to train for fitness on a road bike then on my local trails.
    now if you need training for technical skill, obviously not.
    ^This

    I race endurance and do 90% of my training on a road bike. The trails in my town are all pretty short and don't lend themselves well to steady intensity rides. I like the weekend world championship ride or road race on the occasional weekend. I'll do one SS specific workout a week on hills and also go to the Syllamo Trails in Arkansas for skills practice/long SS rides.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by raganwald
    Or this one:

    Wow. I feel completely inadequate!

  30. #30
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    As mentioned earlier everything counts. I ride probably 90% road in training, split between a Ridley road race bike and a Niner SIR 9 set up monster-cross with drop bars and 34x13 SS. this is due to time availability more than anything. I race a SS hard tail, and until last Saturday at Syllamo, rigid too. Done with that. My technical skills suffer a bit as a result but the road riding builds great power that translates well to SS racing IMO.

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    I find the responses interesting and overall helpful also. I was always curious about riding my geared road bike for training, i knew it couldn't hurt.
    However in my experience training for ss mtb races, (ss is all I ride on the trail) nothing beats saddle time on the bike that I race. I have a second set of more road friendly wheels that I am starting to utilize more than my road bike. I feel that miles in the same geometry/position are the most beneficial to me.
    ymmv...

  32. #32
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shalom View Post
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    Wow, very nice and true imo.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  34. #34
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    Don't over think it. You will find that you will start riding any geared bike like a SS anyway. You will forget that you have gears to use, hammer downhills to get momentum for the next uphill, and be waiting for people with gears (because you keep forgetting you have any)!

  35. #35
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    I also race MTB and do most of my training on the road. I've raced geared MTB in the past and have recently switched over to SS. I found I have been able to kill singlespeed races simply due to higher level of fitness, I feel is a result of road riding. I get at least 100 miles (which I'm not saying is a lot) per week that would be otherwise be really hard to get in on the MTB. These are hard training rides with local groups so they are usually tough rides.
    Losing MTB skills from riding road is hogwash. I took a break from MTB for a while after some hand injuries and didnt loose a step. Instead I put in tons of miles on the road and saw a nice jump in fitness when I came back. In my opinion, this is why pre-riding race courses is so important.
    As far as the geared road vs singlespeed road, I do both. Usually geared. If I do ride geared at our shop ride I usually run 48x16 and have been able to keep up with the group averaging 23+ for the 45mile route. However, I would argue that if you can't keep up with a group on a shop ride it would be more beneficial to ride geared and get the work out with the rest of the group rather than cruising around solo.

    My experience.

  36. #36
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    My Experience:
    -I suck at road riding.
    -I get dropped by a lot on road endurance rides.
    -I drop those same riders on mtb endurance rides.
    -I ride a road bike like a SS mtb (coast down hill, work hard up hill...and I often forget to shift)
    -I ride the geard roadie when trails are in bad shape...might ride more now due to the dusty trails causing me respiratory issues.
    -A buddy of mine races at a high level and his coach has him on gears quite a bit for training sessions that would be hard to replicate on a SS.
    -Rode a SS roadie for years in central NC and it helped a lot. Purchased a geared one when I moved to the Sierra Foothills in Norcal (too much elevation). I can't even make it up my street on my SS mtb (so forget about a SS roadie).
    To finally answer your question...Yes, in my experience, a mtb'er training on a geared road bike (or SS roadie) is much more effective than the opposite (roadie training on a mtb) and if you want to get better, you should ride more road. I plan on it...even though my road bike weighs ~3lbs more than my mtb.
    I no longer deserve a signature. :skep:

  37. #37
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    I just signed up for an endurance race (Stewart SUper Six Pack) and I KNOW I'm gonna have to put in some miles on the road bike in order to be ready (hoping to be ready?) for this event ...

    SPP
    Rigid.

  38. #38
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    SS racers......a question for you....

    Here is what Gerry Pflug has to say. I think he knows a thing or two about training/racing SS's.

    Training: There are many different training plans out there about how to best prepare for a long race. Iím not a coach and I donít use a coach, so I doubt my training information would be very useful for someone looking for a specific training plan. As mentioned above, the most important thing about training for an ultra-endurance event is doing longer rides of four-plus hours. Personally, I ride my bike between 15-25 hours each week from early spring until the endurance-racing season ends. It is the only way I think the body can get used to riding for an extended period of time and it is the best way for a rider to learn what food, clothing and level of effort to use during the race for the best possible finish. When I do my long rides, I do not stop to take breaks. I feel that stopping for 5-10 minutes during a ride gives the body time to recuperate, which is a luxury I donít have when racing. I also recommend training on the same type of bike you will use for the race. It never made much sense to me to train on a road bike or dissimilar mountain bike for a long race. For instance, since I race in the singlespeed class, so I almost always ride my singlespeed mountain bike. Riding a singlespeed is different than riding a bike with gears, so I want to know how my body will react after pushing one gear for an extended period of time. I also train with a heavier bike setup and a harder gear than I would use during the race; however, everything else on my training bike is kept identical to my race bike. I feel like my body becomes completely accustomed to my bike this way and I am sure this makes my riding more efficient and comfortable on race day.

  39. #39
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    SS racers......a question for you....

    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Ark View Post
    Here is what Gerry Pflug has to say. I think he knows a thing or two about training/racing SS's.
    As he said... he knows what he thinks works for him. He was also talking particularly about ultra-endurance, which is one very very small niche in the racing world.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Ark View Post
    Here is what Gerry Pflug has to say. I think he knows a thing or two about training/racing SS's.
    First of all, Pflug is a freak! Seriously. The guy recently won the Mohican 100 outright, on his SS. Amazing! My friend I mentioned in an above post actually trains on both his SS mtb and a geared mtb...not a road bike, so sorry for that error. Actually he raced against Gary his first race of the season, and actually beat him. Of course, since then, Pflug has been on fire!
    Anyway, for most mere mortals, or at least riders who are not sponsored or have 15-25 hrs a week to dedicate to in-the-saddle training, gears are a great way to get specific heart rate zone training. Still, I like the idea of only training on my SS as it is the bike I love the most. But regardless, when the trails are in poor condition, I'm hitting the road.
    I no longer deserve a signature. :skep:

  41. #41
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    SS racers......a question for you....

    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    As he said... he knows what he thinks works for him. He was also talking particularly about ultra-endurance, which is one very very small niche in the racing world.
    He also kicks ass at XC, CX and road.

    http://www.usacycling.org/results/?compid=27999

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Ark View Post
    Here is what Gerry Pflug has to say.
    I believe we're all talking about mortal beings, not super non-humans.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowPokePete View Post
    I just signed up for an endurance race (Stewart SUper Six Pack) and I KNOW I'm gonna have to put in some miles on the road bike in order to be ready (hoping to be ready?) for this event ...

    SPP
    seeing that you are only 20 days out from the six pack, i would utilize both. the road bike will help with your legs and ability to recover on the bike, and the mtb will get the rest of your body ready. extend your rides out but remember to allow for recovery between rides.i would also start thinking/experimenting with hrydration and nutrition.

  44. #44
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    O.k., I decided to pull the road bike off the wall (hanging there since April) and give it a go. I did 63 easy miles...easy in that there was little elevation to speak of, but I kept my cadence up and averaged a bit faster than I thought I could...and only had two short stops (seat adjustment and a whiz). Overall I felt like it was a decent workout, but it was more 'fun' than anything...of course I was on a picturesque bike trail the entire time with plenty of eye candy to keep one occupied and motivated (don't judge). In the end I felt like the only way gears would help me is if I had a coach (not gonna happen) or a heart rate monitor (not going to happen) and a plan for intervals or zones etc. It seems that long rides with plenty of hills definitely would be good training for endurance events, but I gotta lean more towards Pflug's Philosophy of riding the bike you are racing and riding trails similar to what you will be racing on. Heck, on a SS every hill is an interval. Still, I will plan more road riding this summer (two a month would be an increase). It might not drastically improve my endurace on the mtb but I doubt it will hurt, it will be easier on the body, and it is a fun way to mix it up.
    I no longer deserve a signature. :skep:

  45. #45
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    "easy" miles are for winter base. it's almost summer, and you should be challenging yourself. if you don't overreach, you will not adapt, and become stronger. DO WORK SON!

  46. #46
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    whatever allows you to ride the most effectively in your allotted time.

    if you live near legit hills and want to train to race SS, it's reasonable to come up with nothing but long SS rides that continuously challenge you. if you live somewhere flat and your options are riding roller-coaster singletrack that's probably not making your body adapt, or driving an hour+ to get to a decent hill...then you're probably better off challenging yourself on a road bike with 2x20's or shorter, harder intervals to try to replicate the differences in SS riding and if nothing else creating better overall bike fitness.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmxer View Post
    It will be beneficial to your racing only if you're racing a singlespeed 29er. If you're racing 26" ss, then no.
    Nope. Cross training, running, riding unicycles, doing cartwheels all the way to work and back, anything helps.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowPokePete View Post
    I just signed up for an endurance race (Stewart SUper Six Pack) and I KNOW I'm gonna have to put in some miles on the road bike in order to be ready (hoping to be ready?) for this event ...

    SPP
    good work out there on going out and getting your sixth lap. for as flowy as a park that stewart is, riding that many hours ss puts a beating on you

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