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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm ss pedals clipless or platform

    I like platform pedals myself because im a everyday type person and I like using my feet when I crash. Im not knocking clipless pedals I have never used them. But what do other riders use? Tell me why you use a certain type.

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    Thanks

    I say some stupid things sometimes.Usually I say or type it before I know it. Gets me in trouble with the ladies but o'well. THANKS ... What do you ride and why

  4. #4
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    Clipless. Upstroke is crucial when you can't downshift. The idea that clipless pedals are dangerous is 95% garbage. Your feet just sort of pop out of them when they need to. I'll take the tiny bit of increased danger associated with being clipped in over the danger of my foot coming off the pedal on accident. Survive the first week with them and your on easy street. Different strokes for different folks I suppose.

    And yeah, this thread is super redundant and I probably shouldn't have contributed to it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wes m.
    The idea that clipless pedals are dangerous is 95% garbage.
    its 100% garbage. i have been riding clipless for 5 years now. i put more thought into clipping in that i do when i need to get out. i could not imagin riding any mountain bike with platforms, let along a single speed. your upstroke is equally as improtnant as your down stroke.

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    So let me get this straight: I buy clipless than a special pair of magic shoes to ride. Ok and hows this suppose to help me? I've never had problems with slipage. So now how will these improve my riding? I dont want to but something because everyone else has them, they look cool, or there they in thing. Performance is key: so does this give me more on my stroke? HOW? I know im Fred Flintstone when it comes to technology or change? I go with what I know.

  7. #7
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    here is my take:

    if your at all serious about going fast you NEED clipless. the gain in efficiency once you learn to use them is ridiculous.

    if not, who cares, use what makes you happy...

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    So what are decent pair that are inexpensive?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain_America1976
    its 100% garbage. i have been riding clipless for 5 years now. i put more thought into clipping in that i do when i need to get out. i could not imagin riding any mountain bike with platforms, let along a single speed. your upstroke is equally as improtnant as your down stroke.
    I reckon it's all bollocks unless you're racing when that tiny percent of extra thrust from the upstroke may make that few seconds difference.

    If you have trouble with your feet coming off a good quality set of platforms you probably have too much weight on your arse instead of taking it on your feet.
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    I don't ride plats 'cause I think they're 'dangerous'. Contraire, I've ridden thousands of miles in clipless pedals on my roadie. Unclipping without having to think about it is 2nd nature, but I confess I haven't done it offroad. I ditched 'em because I got iliotibial band syndrome one spring when I added too many miles too fast (basically a century 1st good warm day we had, really dumb), and I was never able to get rid of it UNTIL I ditched the clipless pedals. Being able to shift my foot around on the pedal goes miles (heh...) towards relieving any tightness I start feeling at the outside of my knee. It just feels better, so that's why I rides plats.
    I'm hearing what everyone says about how crucial the upstroke is to SS'ing. I've got a pair of Eggbeaters I'll throw on my new SS 29'er (when I get it) and give 'em a try again.
    But I like the feeling of being on plats, so if it's not night and day, I'll probably go back to 'em. Besides, it makes a statement when I'm pedaling in my Converse hightops. Entry level, inexpensive? I had Shimano PD540's, and no complaints. I'll let you know how I like the entry level stainless Eggbeaters soon as I try 'em. A really good shoe to go with those PD 540's I found to be the Specialized Body Geometry Mountain Sport shoes. No hotspots, don't look dorky, give your feet good support. It's just trail riding...you don't have to spend a freakin' fortune, like the roadies do.

  11. #11
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    The earth is 6000 years old, forget that carbon dating stuff and trust that old book. Its also flat and supported by elephants who are standing on a turtle.

    And platforms are just as efficient as clipless. Carry on, no need to change what you're doing at this point.

    Quote Originally Posted by big ro
    I know im Fred Flintstone when it comes to technology or change? I go with what I know.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by big ro
    So let me get this straight: I buy clipless than a special pair of magic shoes to ride. Ok and hows this suppose to help me? I've never had problems with slipage. So now how will these improve my riding? I dont want to but something because everyone else has them, they look cool, or there they in thing. Performance is key: so does this give me more on my stroke? HOW? I know im Fred Flintstone when it comes to technology or change? I go with what I know.
    Its hard to distinguish some ones tone over the internet but this seems to be a dickish response considering that you asked people to tell you why they like clipless.

    Clipless can improve your riding in the following ways compared to platforms:

    Having upstroke, in fact add improved forward and backward stroke to that. This helps a lot in climbing because it adds to your total power and allows you to use more of your leg which reduces fatigue in the muscle that push the pedal down.

    Power transfer, stiffer shoes = better power transfer

    Maneuverability, being clipped allows you more ability to manipulate the bike, especially the rear end

    Bike specific shoes, clipless shoes are designed for riding, lots of vents and other stuff to keep your feet comfy.

    These are benefits that I have personal experience with. I have ridden both types or pedals and oldschool toe clip pedals too. My ability to climb with clipless pedals is seriously double what it was on platforms. You dont even need to choose between the two, just buy crank bros mallet c. I love them and they cost less than high end platforms. I got a pair of mallet c pedals and the low end of the racing level shimano shoes from 07 for $120 out the door.

    This analogy is a exaggerated but it should give you an idea of how I feel. Riding with platform pedals is like not wrapping your fingers around the handlebars. Being attached means being in control.

    I find the idea of people riding clipless because its fashionable to be sort of misguided. The shoes look f'ing ridiculous if you ask me.

    Thats my 2 cents.
    Last edited by wes m.; 12-27-2008 at 07:51 PM.

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    For me it's not the upstroke when climbing that matters most, it's the ability to stay connected to the bike when bouncing around in rocky terrain. With platform pedals you have to maintain downward pressure on the pedals or you lose contact. With clipless pedals you don't have to worry about coming off the pedals. As far as crashing goes, the only time I have ever had an issue with getting unclipped is during super low speed tip overs. I'd much prefer platforms for slow technical climbs, but that's the only time they work better. For all other conditions, a clipless pedal is superior. And don't forget, if you do pop off of your platform pedal, you are quite likely to get a serious case of "shin burger" when that sucker rakes across your leg.

    And yes, this has been covered ad nauseum in other posts. But I just felt like spewing my worthless 2 cents anyway. Thanks for listening.

  14. #14
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    I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

    If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

    I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

    BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
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  15. #15
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    Ride each way for a year or so and then decide. It's as easy as that. There is no shortcut to finding out for yourself.
    I ride with platforms. I don't find clipless to be more efficient or increase power but you might. For me clipless pedals would feel as out of place on a singlespeed as gears or a suspension fork.
    bruce b.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

    If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

    I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

    BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
    Great post! You're right....thanks for reminding me for the other major reason I like plats. You can actually walk around like an ordinary person, when you get to the beautiful place you're going to...DOH! Try that with your dork shoes. I used to hate that, with my roadie. I'd get to this beautiful place, have to walk like a penguin. Even SPD, the cleats aren't going to let you hike any trails. It's called 'real world' riding. You rule, Velobike.

  17. #17
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    Not trying to start anything here, but what does deep into the mountains mean, and not using the bike as a toy? Bikes are toys. 20 miles in? 40? A multi day trek? If so, you're smart to pack a kit including extra shoes and a GPS beacon. Its no reason to go for that long with less efficient pedaling. Here is a pic at the finish line of the GDR after 22 days of riding from canada to mexico. Check out the clown shoes and those crazy pedals!

    Edit, linky don't work, clicky instead:

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/_ttmJ_nLqv...-h/GDR_024.JPG

    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

    If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

    I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

    BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

    If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

    I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

    BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
    I'm gonna go out on a limb and say most mountain bikers don't walk for miles in their clipless shoes, they ride in them. Who knows really, I might be totally off.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_slacker
    ... what does deep into the mountains mean...
    ...Bikes are toys. 20 miles in? 40? A multi day trek?
    ...If so, you're smart to pack a kit including extra shoes and a GPS beacon. Its no reason to go for that long with less efficient pedaling....
    Deep is relative. Think broken bike, or broken self, and it all becomes very different. Expect it to happen to you one day and be prepared for self rescue.

    In Australia people have died when they had to walk just 10 miles to get help - simply because they did not have suitable cover or sufficient water - they relied on the reliability of their transport, but it broke.

    About a year ago, here in the Highlands of Scotland, we had an experienced fit young man who had raced in 24 hour winter races, die of exposure in a blizzard within half a mile of his car. From what I read, the weather conditions went bad and he didn't have suitable gear on.

    So deep depends on you. How far can you go self supported when things go really really bad? Say broken bike, severely adverse weather, some injury - pick how lucky you think you are going to be.

    My day ride kit means I can self support at least 24 hrs without shelter. No way am I going to add the weight of an extra pair of shoes to that. If I add extra weight it would be clothing or food.

    As for the bike being a toy, that comes back to my original statement. Some people use a bike as transport, but if you are using your bike as a toy, then you are usually well within the reach of help, so what you put on your feet is irrelevant.

    As far as the extra efficiency of pulling up, has there been any real world tests on this on a mountainbike for several hours? (I don't doubt its usefulness on a road bike where you are seated most of the time)
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  20. #20
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    The shoe makers realize the need for walkable bike shoes - check out the choices from Sidi, Shimano and Lake as well as some new entries from Bontrager including the cheap(er) Race which I use in Pisgah for the many hike-a-bikes and rocky stream crossings. No need for extra shoes.... although the Race is a bit heavy it makes a great training shoe.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullet dew
    I'm gonna go out on a limb and say most mountain bikers don't walk for miles in their clipless shoes, they ride in them. Who knows really, I might be totally off.
    You're right of course, and there's nothing wrong with that

    Just so long as nothing goes wrong.
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    Im glad to see my Mt. Bike Brothers and Sisters are so opinionated. Thanks for all the advice its been helpful. As for me Im going to ride until the pedals fall off and then Ill decide. With the money I save the first pitcher is on me at the watering hole (if youre of age). Just for the record Im not a racer just an everyday guy who likes to play with my toys and get dirty, roll down hills, and drop-off big rocks. For now I lean toward plats.

  23. #23
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    What if...
    What if I fall and break my helmet, should I carry another just in case I fall again?
    What if... etc you really have to draw a line somewhere when it comes to being prepared vs over prepared.
    If my bike was not ridable I could hike out in my clipless shoes, my feet might be sore but thats the extent. I wear Lake shoes with Vibram soles and my feet were not sore after I got lost and had to hike a bike for 30 minutes(I wasn't the one reading the map). After a few hours that would probably change, but I will take that risk in exchange for the extra power and control of clipless.

    Weigh the options and decide for yourself, or better yet try them both for a significant amount of time.

  24. #24
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    Sounds like a plan. I've enjoyed the many excellent points made by both sides, and intend to try some Eggbeaters on my SS. But knowing my knee, I'll bet I'll end up going back to plats.

  25. #25
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    In addition to the basic common sense of clipless, on a singlespeed, the upstroke really does give you an extra gear. Try it you'll like it.

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    Good luck with that knee Doggity. As for me I have a bum wrist I deal with, maybe I need a Suspension Fork.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.
    .

    This is the single speed forum, right? The vast majority of single speed bikes are hard tails. So, if you are hitting rocks, roots, etc at high speed, there is a very real chance that you'll hit something wrong and your weight could shift in such a way that you lose contact with the pedals (if you're on platforms). I'm not talking about riding seated - I am talking about going extremely fast downhill, and using your arms and legs to absorb shock. Riding platform pedals is like riding rigid - it is more challenging and overall more difficult if you like to go fast downhill. If you like that particular challenge, more power to you. Just don't tell me you have the same control, because you don't.

    PS - It is NOTHING like riding a dirtbike. Off road motorcycles have long travel suspension and a lot more mass than a bicycle. And if you were going 90mph, you'd have a lot of momentum that would tend to keep you from getting kicked off the foot pegs unless you bottomed the suspension really hard, in which case you might also need an ambulance.

  28. #28
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    I run platforms on my Karate Monkey now because its going to get an xtracycle welded onto it next week and I would just rather run flats on a cargo rig...but my scalpel has eggbeaters on it for the sole purpose of control, being clipped in makes you one solid unit.
    Broken ankles = bullshit!

  29. #29
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    I'd rather hike for days in crappy shoes than hike at all with a sprain/fracture because my foot came off the pedal when it shouldn't have. For someone to say their feet never ever come off the pedals when on platforms is just leading you wrong.

    BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
    Worst advice ever. You might get injured, you might not, but I'll learn from someone wiser than myself and avoid a possible 40+ year long injury.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thor29
    ...This is the single speed forum, right?...
    I hope so

    Quote Originally Posted by Thor29
    ...The vast majority of single speed bikes are hard tails. So, if you are hitting rocks, roots, etc at high speed, there is a very real chance that you'll hit something wrong and your weight could shift in such a way that you lose contact with the pedals (if you're on platforms). I'm not talking about riding seated - I am talking about going extremely fast downhill, and using your arms and legs to absorb shock. Riding platform pedals is like riding rigid - it is more challenging and overall more difficult if you like to go fast downhill. If you like that particular challenge, more power to you. Just don't tell me you have the same control, because you don't...
    Ok, I see your point, but I thought I made it clear (in an earlier post) that I was not talking about racing.

    BTW I do ride a rigid hardtail, and I don't know if I have the same control as you, but I haven't had a foot come off my pedals in many years on downhills. I ride downhills on the assumption that I may meet people walking up, so maybe that restricts my speed.

    Where my feet come off the pedals is when I stick the front wheel in a big hole and it stops suddenly. That's when I am happy to be on flat pedals because I don't do a header.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thor29
    .
    PS - It is NOTHING like riding a dirtbike. Off road motorcycles have long travel suspension and a lot more mass than a bicycle. And if you were going 90mph, you'd have a lot of momentum that would tend to keep you from getting kicked off the foot pegs unless you bottomed the suspension really hard, in which case you might also need an ambulance.
    I disagree. It is something like riding a dirtbike (in my day, dirtbikes didn't have long travel suspension ). On either machine, my experience has been that if you have your weight in the saddle and hit rough stuff at speed, there's a good chance your feet will come off the pedals. The way to keep your feet planted is to be putting your full weight on them.

    The only time I attach my feet to pedals is when I take my fixed gear bike out for a trot (but that's road and it's straps).

    Has anyone actually got measurable proof (not anecdotal) that using the pull up has any benefits in real world mountain biking? (As opposed to the short periods of the average mountain bike race).
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    Has anyone actually got measurable proof (not anecdotal) that using the pull up has any benefits in real world mountain biking? (As opposed to the short periods of the average mountain bike race).
    This will probably classify as anecdotal, but then who in their right mind would even want to undertake an objective study on this topic:? Anyway, I've raced eight 100 mile mtb races and eight 100 K mtb races over about the last 10 years, and I will swear on a stack of bibles that no one riding platforms has ever placed in the top 50% of any of those races. True, not many attempt those races with platforms, but still... Anyone out there who does endurance races ever get beaten by someone sporting platform pedals on their bike? (It doesn't count if you're bringing up the rear or are just racing yourself and you're on platforms!) But your arguments are so persuasive that I truly hope everyone reading this thread who also intends to race the Laramie Enduro 100 K this coming July switches to platforms 'cause they're clearly superior to being clipped in...

    Actually, the one guy I ride with who does use platforms keeps up for the first 10 miles, which quite frankly I find impressive considering my perception of them as a handicap, and then falls off the back of the group as the ride continues. So my read on this whole platform versus clipped debate is that platforms are okay for short distances at a reasonable speed (say, an hour or 10 miles if you're fit like my friend) and for trick riding at terrain parks (preferable there), but for prolonged speed or distance riding being clipped in is the way to go. I'm not anti-platform pedal -- my townie has them!

    And then there's the "I might have to walk out" issue. That's just a silly argument -- mtb shoes with cleats on the bottom walk well enough to do what needs to be done on foot, whether it's to scramble up a hill or walk 10 miles carrying a broken bike. If you can't get yourself out, don't got there.

    YMMV and for some it apparently does...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    This will probably classify as anecdotal, but then who in their right mind would even want to undertake an objective study on this topic:? Anyway, I've raced eight 100 mile mtb races and eight 100 K mtb races over about the last 10 years, and I will swear on a stack of bibles that no one riding platforms has ever placed in the top 50% of any of those races...
    It was a serious question. I appreciate that in racing there may be some advantages in clipless because differences of even 0.5% can separate the winner from the first loser.

    I asked because I race occasionally, not a lot, just a 24 hour race each winter in Scotland plus an odd 12 hour. Oh, and any single speed race that happens near me, but they are mainly about beer, so not being clipped to the bike is a distinct advantage for them.

    As somewhat of a relic, I'm happy with my usual placing near the 50% mark in 24 hr races against geared riders. Last 24 hr race I did the same amount of laps as the 3rd SS rider, but he was faster.

    If there was evidence of a benefit I would consider clipping in for the race.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    ...And then there's the "I might have to walk out" issue. That's just a silly argument -- mtb shoes with cleats on the bottom walk well enough to do what needs to be done on foot, whether it's to scramble up a hill or walk 10 miles carrying a broken bike ...
    That's fine then, so long as you have tested it. My observations are that riders wearing cleated shoes or boots seem to suffer considerable discomfort if they have to walk any distance. Hobbling with blisters is not a good way to cover distance. Probably new technology is improving this. Any winter boot recommendations?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    ... If you can't get yourself out, don't got there. ...
    Exactly, but my philosophy is to dress and carry kit suitable for adverse conditions, so that I can go there and get back if it goes pear-shaped.
    Last edited by Velobike; 12-29-2008 at 12:08 PM. Reason: clarification
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  33. #33
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    Who cares? Ride what you want. These clipless vs. platforms treads are pretty pointless IMHO. If you ride for performance, the answer is obvious.

    -Chuck

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCast
    Worst advice ever. You might get injured, you might not, but I'll learn from someone wiser than myself and avoid a possible 40+ year long injury.
    Mmm, if you read it, it says when carried to extreme (which he apparently did). There are also lots of complaints of knee injuries from people with improperly adjusted cleats. Any idiot can damage his joints if he does something to excess.

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckjoga
    Who cares? Ride what you want. These clipless vs. platforms treads are pretty pointless IMHO. If you ride for performance, the answer is obvious.

    -Chuck
    Chuck, it may surprise you that some people actually ride their bikes for enjoyment. They even, gasp, get off them at some points and walk/climb extensively in the mountains. This is quite a valid subject of discussion for us.

    Simply is there sufficient advantage in wearing clumsy shoes with cleats to make up for the disadvantages? Is there a real (measurable) performance advantage on a long mountain bike ride? I was hoping someone could point me to evidence of this.
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  35. #35
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    With 33 replies its obvious someone cares. There a lot of mountain bikers who think very deeply and have strong opinions. Its also fun to see what people will spend their money on and just how much there willing to spend. Do Air Jordan basketball shoes make a person jump higher or run faster? Probably not, but they feel good and look cool. In a sport that has a heavy financial influence I prefer simplicity, too me that is best.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by big ro
    ...I prefer simplicity, too me that is best...
    Me too. If I liked dipping complex mechanical stuff in the mud, I'd also fit a derailleur so I could punish more of Mr Shimano's products.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike

    Chuck, it may surprise you that some people actually ride their bikes for enjoyment. They even, gasp, get off them at some points and walk/climb extensively in the mountains. This is quite a valid subject of discussion for us.

    Simply is there sufficient advantage in wearing clumsy shoes with cleats to make up for the disadvantages? Is there a real (measurable) performance advantage on a long mountain bike ride? I was hoping someone could point me to evidence of this.
    My point is that nobody really cares that the OP improve his performance. This is mostly about expressing an individual's opinion. For as many good reasons to use clipless, somebody is going to have a pretty lame reason not to use clipless pedals.

    Like I said, ride what you want. Meaning, whatever makes you happy. That's what it's all about.

    As for proof of advantage, I think that the fact that probably near 100% of road and off-road racers use clipless pedals should be enough to give the theory some credibility. I'm sure somebody is going to take me to task and say that this is an "opinion" rather than fact.

    Look at one simple fact. By not "pedaling in circles", you are accelerating with each pedal stroke and slowing at the top/bottom stroke. You can hear this as the tire tread grips the surface when accelerating. The constant acceleration/deceleration of your own mass and to spin up the mass of the wheels/tires takes more energy than if you could maintain a constant speed. This is very similar to driving your car at a constant speed on the highway versus erratic accelerations. Your mileage will be better at a constant speed. Even though this assumes a perfectly constant speed, no matter how minute the excess energy expenditure, it can be measured and any savings will allow a rider to be more efficient and either ride faster or longer.

    If you never pull up on the pedals and try to round out the stroke, clipless pedals will not help you. Stick with flats.

    -Chuck

  38. #38
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    Clipless, it is more effecient.

    My choice is crankbrothers.

  39. #39
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    I vote for what Sir137 said -clipless all the way for SS riding. I have a pair of crank bros Candy T4i on my traibike and use standard candy pedals on the ss. Some of the crank brothers pedals like the mallet give you a good size platform to put your foot on if you want to ride some sections not clipped in.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    Me too. If I liked dipping complex mechanical stuff in the mud, I'd also fit a derailleur so I could punish more of Mr Shimano's products.
    Y'know, it's whatever works for you. My single speed currently runs a rigid fork but has hydraulic disc brakes and clipless pedals. I've seen the same argument against disc brakes, but I had a lot more issues with V-brakes and Avid mechanical disc brakes than I have with my Formula hydraulics. My eggbeaters are from the very first generation, have never been lubed, and have never failed. (The bearings are getting a little worn out from the abuse though). They aren't really all that complex - you add a clip to your shoe and a spring to your pedal. I guess the clip could come loose from your shoe or the spring could fail, but if you want to stop every potential mechanical failure, you could just go hiking instead. Or unicycling - they have no chains to break, can't run suspension or clipless pedals, and have one fewer wheel/tire combo to give you problems. There's your ultimate solution!

  41. #41
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    Hey now thats a genius idea. Im buying a unicycle and putting a 29" wheel on it, with beefy tires, and a set of clipless pedals. I'll see ya at the trails dont laugh when I pass you on my new SS UNICYCLE.

  42. #42
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    Do they use clipless with unicycles? Definitely do go 29'er with you uni...you just might start The Next Big Thing.

  43. #43
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    Im gonna have to be real good to pull off clipless on a unicycle. Maybe I should look on forums at www.uni.com.and see what other people are using on their unicycles.

  44. #44
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    It's getting a bit personal

    My "lameness" and "stupidity" are now exposed for the world to see.

    So for those who have not read the whole thread:

    1. I do not doubt the benefit of attaching your feet to your pedals for road racing. The percentage increase is not high, but every increase is worthwhile in racing. The only studies that prove this (of which I am aware) are for road bikes and the aerodynamic position adopted. If there is one for mountain bikes, please tell me where to find it.

    2. I do not believe the argument about keeping your feet on the bike in rough terrain has any great merit. Plenty cycling is done at speed on platform pedals over rough terrain - eg downhill racing. BMX and Trials riders also show that complex manoeuvres can be done without clipping in.

    3. I do not believe that there is an advantage gained by attaching your feet to your pedals when you are using your mountain bike for non speed purposes. Cleats are a curse if you want to do anything any non-bike. I'm sure I'm not the only one here who likes to hike his bike over unrideable stuff, sometimes for miles. There are several other disadvantages, but let's talk about the advantages. If there is any proof that there is a benefit greater than the disadvantages, again tell me where to find it.

    4. I don't think you are stupid if you prefer to use cleats for recreational riding off road.

    In short, where is the evidence? (A proper study, that is)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  45. #45
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    I don't have a study to give you nor do I think that is the only way to determine which is more effective. A simple ride on both does it, which I've done. 5 years on platforms and 6 with clipless. I don't think you're stupid either FWIW but can't for the life of me figure out why anyone who has ridden both would prefer platforms.

    With that said, the argument about hiking in cleats is bunk. Take a look through any modern catalog or website and you'll see MANY examples of hiking style shoes/boots with cleats, even sandals!

    I hike a bike from time to time as any SSer does, and anyone who has been to vegas will not dispute the roughness of the terrain here. Yet I've had no significant discomfort, blisters or crippling of any type. I wouldn't want to run a marathon in my sidi's but its not like all of a sudden you can't walk a mile or two. LOL!

  46. #46
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    I offer the following question to anyone pondering the choice of clipless or platform: are you now or have you ever been a serious bmx or trails rider? If the answer to that question is yes, you already know that platforms are the way for you. If no, you will likely enjoy the benefits of clipless. That said, if you have always ridden on one style of pedal, I'll wager you'd learn a lot about riding technique by exploring the other.

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