SS Newbie Questions- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    SS Newbie Questions

    Can I run a standard 9 sp. chain. My Rig chain says narrow on it and I bought a single speed specific chain and it look aweful wide BMX ? maybe.(it may be the wrong type) Also I adjusted my ebb and was wondering how you determine how much slack you should leave in the chain. I adjusted it to put a slightly bigger cog and it feels like it may have a little more drag like I may have tightened it just a bit too much. Not quite binding but not as smooth as when the other cog was on it w/ a bit of slack. Everything is new so it is probably too tight. Any info would be great. Oh yeah I am HOOKED I will always own a single speed now. I wish I wouldn't have waited this long.

  2. #2
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    You need to re-aline the EBB when you change cogs. Sorry.

    A 9 speed chain is 11/128. A 7/8 speed chain is 3/32. A single speed chain is 1/8. If the SS chain looks too wide, try a 7/8 speed chain. A 9 speed might be too narrow. I had issues running a 9 speed on a standard 3/32 SS cog. The chain would stick to the rear cog. Works in a way, but there was a slight, certainly noticeable drag.

    BTW: I've just started SS, too. We can trade beginner mistakes and solutions found.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  3. #3
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    Im going to join the newbie club!

    Tearing apart an old diamondback i picked up a few years back to kick around on.... figure its a good learning platform.

  4. #4
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    I guess a lot of it depends on the set up. My Rig came w/ a 18 tooth cog and it is just a stamped thin cog. I believe these type you can use a 9 speed chain. However the new cog I got is a singleworks machined steel one and is a bit wider. The 3/32 seems to work the best. Funny thing is I was cleaning my bike after a ride and it says right on the cog 3/32 kindof a rookie mistake just started to read today So if you are using a standard chainring and a thin stamped cog a 9 sp. chain would work fine. But once you get into the thicker more high end cogs they are thicker. I was told by the bike shop the 1/8 chains are more for cruiser type bikes and that was what I had at first.

  5. #5
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    rookie question,

    bigger the front gear and smaller the rear gear equals harder pedaling and more speed?

    like I said rookie.....

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom schoonveld
    I guess a lot of it depends on the set up. My Rig came w/ a 18 tooth cog and it is just a stamped thin cog. I believe these type you can use a 9 speed chain. However the new cog I got is a singleworks machined steel one and is a bit wider. The 3/32 seems to work the best. Funny thing is I was cleaning my bike after a ride and it says right on the cog 3/32 kindof a rookie mistake just started to read today So if you are using a standard chainring and a thin stamped cog a 9 sp. chain would work fine. But once you get into the thicker more high end cogs they are thicker. I was told by the bike shop the 1/8 chains are more for cruiser type bikes and that was what I had at first.
    Not exactly true, the stamped steel ones are usually 3/32". I have a bunch kicking around and they all measure .093"
    They usually just stamp them out of 13 gauge sheet (.089"), and then the plating adds a little bit.
    I make my cogs and chainrings a hair under 3/32" so there is less friction.

  7. #7
    nocturnal oblivion
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorBob
    rookie question,

    bigger the front gear and smaller the rear gear equals harder pedaling and more speed?

    like I said rookie.....
    correct

  8. #8
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    ok, follow up

    36*18 would be harder to pedal then a 34*18 and a 34*16 would be even easier to pedal???

    Wow the more I learn the more I learn Im a rookie!

  9. #9
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    Best way to look at it is to divide front/rear.

    36/18 = 2
    32/16 = 2

    Both are the same in terms of transmission ratio. Same speed,same pedalling effort.

    34/18 = 1.88
    34/16 = 2.15

    34/18 pedals easier (and is slower) than 36/18.However 34/16 is harder (and faster). The lower the number for the ratio, the slower and easier the gearing is. Consider a granny on a geared MTB. 22/34 = 0.65.Now consider the fastest combination on a typical MTB. 44/11 = 4.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  10. #10
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    The cog that came on my Rig is visibly thinner than the single works one. I guess different brands may be different. I actually tried a WTB cog and the teeth profile was significantly different enough so it would catch even on a 3/32 chain. I am still experimenting w/ gearing. My Rig came w/ 32 in front and 18 in the back. This a 29er though if you run a 26 you can probably do 32 16. I have tried a 20 and may even try a 19. Up a few steeps on my local trails the 18 was a bit much and the 20 seems to spin out a bit too quickly on the flats and the rolling stuff. There is a fine line something you can push but also something you can stay moving pretty well on the flat and rolling stuff. That is my limited experience anyway. Considering you have only one gear

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