SS Hub vs 'normal' hub- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    SS Hub vs 'normal' hub

    HI all. Still new to the SS scene. What is the difference/advantages to a SS specific rear hub vs a 'normal' hub and adding some mores spacers?

  2. #2
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    HEY!! SS IS NORMAL! ;-)

    I ride only geared hubs with spacers... just 'cuz.
    Bike Building and Painting

    Crystavox Single Speed Bikes

  3. #3
    King Pin
    Reputation: xrmattaz's Avatar
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    The major difference is one of wheel strength. A SS specific hub will be built with a "dishless" rear wheel, the spokes will be the same length on either side.....stronger wheel.

    I've run both with success, but with the torque a SS'er can generate, spokes on the drive side can break.

  4. #4
    local trails rider
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    A "normal" hub with spacers has an edge in versatility: changing cogs is easy and cheap, and there's a lot of range for adjusting chainline.

    Of course, you can use that same hub to build a gearie too (gasp)...

    Hope's SS Hub is a "normal" hub that has a smaller freehub, enough for 5 or 6 cogs. It comes pretty close to dishless.

  5. #5
    Sweep the leg!
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    As you said in your other thread, Kings and I9's are out of your price range. I understand your motivation for asking "can a normal hub work." I think what you're asking is understandable, can a hub you already have or can get for a lot less work for LONG TERM single speed use. The answer is yes, of course it can.

    The folks espousing the use of "single speed only" hubs have the best intentions, but the reality of the mechanics, dynamics and economics of your bike (and mine) dictate using what works. Yeah, it's great to have blingity parts (I it isn't a word) but the bottom line is to have a bike that you can ride and not have chainline or gearing issues.

    Let's say there's a choice between a Shimano XT/LX rear hub (multispeed cassette compatible) and a Formula (singlespeed compatible) hub. I'd personally choose the Shimano for the simple reason of when I want or need to trade or sell it I'm not limited to who's a buyer. The equal bearing quality (open for debate there) and similar weight make it a viable hub for any rider, SS or Multispeed.

    It has been mentioned that you should seek a SS designed hub for a more dishless configuration and thus a stronger wheel. I don't think you should lose sleep over this point. If having a dishless wheel was more advantageous you'd be seeing all hubs being designed in such a way. Obviously less dish is better, but I don't feel this is an issue since 1987 when everybody and their brother went 8 speed in the rear and opened the Pandora's Box of cogs vs axle spacing.

    Case in point. Most everyone I know and this includes guys much faster than everyone on this board, (Jesse Lelonde, Marco Lelonde, Ron Stawicki, Russell, Bubba, Rick...) are riding multispeed rear hubs. Bontrager, SunRingle, Shimano and King Iso are all being used as go-fast wheels and simply spaced for the one cog.

    Why should your needs be any different? They shouldn't. If you find a decent quality hub that you can work with you should grab it.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  6. #6
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb.mick
    HI all. Still new to the SS scene. What is the difference/advantages to a SS specific rear hub vs a 'normal' hub and adding some mores spacers?
    a freewheel hub has zero chain alignment and requires using a spin on bmx style freewheel.

    ss cassette hubs and "normal" hubs allow for fine tuning chain alignment, but the difference is in the amount of dish and number of spacers.

    after that its all personal preference and what your wallet will allow.

    also, some hubs have more engagement points resulting in a more positive feel and instant engagement.

    and lastly... yes, a dishless wheel is stronger but you will most likely never generate enough torque to expose or exploit the "weakness" of a dished wheel.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caffeine Powered
    Let's say there's a choice between a Shimano XT/LX rear hub (multispeed cassette compatible) and a Formula (singlespeed compatible) hub. I'd personally choose the Shimano for the simple reason of when I want or need to trade or sell it I'm not limited to who's a buyer. The equal bearing quality (open for debate there) and similar weight make it a viable hub for any rider, SS or Multispeed.

    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    and lastly... yes, a dishless wheel is stronger but you will most likely never generate enough torque to expose or exploit the "weakness" of a dished wheel.

    IMO these are the two issues.

    I have run everything from 'multispeed' LX to King SS. All with great success.


    RUN WHAT U BRUNG
    aLaN AT BikeMojo DOT com

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