SS Cog/Chain Management- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Rohloff
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    SS Cog/Chain Management

    I'm new to SSing. I sometimes ride some steep, loose, hilly terrain and sometimes flatter hard pack. I'm thinking about changing gearing. I don't want to fuss with this too much but I'd like some options. How do you manage this? Seperate chains and cogs that go together or do you add and remove links? It seems that adding and removing pins would create weak points in the chain. Do quicklinks work well on SS?

  2. #2
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    Are you gearing up pre-ride or looking to make changes midstream? dinglespeed potential?

    edit:

    Upon dropping the beer & focusing... I keep another chain at the ready for my 'running about town' cog. A couple master links & all is well.

    (I suspect a short add-on length would be sufficient as well... considering usage/chain wear.)
    Last edited by steven.c; 12-10-2010 at 08:05 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdc
    I'm new to SSing. I sometimes ride some steep, loose, hilly terrain and sometimes flatter hard pack. I'm thinking about changing gearing. I don't want to fuss with this too much but I'd like some options. How do you manage this? Seperate chains and cogs that go together or do you add and remove links? It seems that adding and removing pins would create weak points in the chain. Do quicklinks work well on SS?
    I have 16, 17, 18, 20T cogs, and 3 chains. The 16, 17/18, and 20. I could add a 15 and 19 to that without adding a chain. There is 1 link difference between each adjacent chain.

    However, my concern is that the sprocket isn't swapped, and could cause premature wear on the other chain/cogs.

    There are only a couple races where 20 is necessary, and will try to use 16 most of next season. This is my first year SS, so I was dabbling with which gears suit local courses.

    I don't know if it is the best solution, but it is what I have.

  4. #4
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    Get a gear changer? I hear there are 9 speeds these days.

    On a serious note, I guess it makes sense to have different gears if you are racing regularly. But if this discussion is to fuss with the gear for your weekend rides, why bother going SS? I would put the gear that gives me the hardest time on my weekend ride and stick with it. I look/sound miserable going up, and spin out like a hamster on a wheel on flats. I'm fine by that.

  5. #5
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by hatake
    Get a gear changer? I hear there are 9 speeds these days.

    On a serious note, I guess it makes sense to have different gears if you are racing regularly. But if this discussion is to fuss with the gear for your weekend rides, why bother going SS? I would put the gear that gives me the hardest time on my weekend ride and stick with it. I look/sound miserable going up, and spin out like a hamster on a wheel on flats. I'm fine by that.
    /\ /\ /\ this for me, pretty much.

    That said, I do have an assortment of cogs and won't hesitate to switch gears depending on terrain, assuming the ride is epic. For example, a 17t or 18t cog works best if I'm doing an out-'n-back on the McKenzie River Trail (50 miles) because there are no extended climbs and the trail follows the river. But if I'm taking on Bunchgrass Trail (a sawtooth ridgetop trail, ~35 miles) I'll leave my 20t on for sure. It is all either steep up or steep down.

    For night rides or shorter spins, I just run what I brung.

    I've had no problems, ever, with a SRAM Powerlink. Multiple Powerlinks in the same chain, even.

    --sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    /\ /\ /\ this for me, pretty much.

    That said, I do have an assortment of cogs and won't hesitate to switch gears depending on terrain, assuming the ride is epic. For example, a 17t or 18t cog works best if I'm doing an out-'n-back on the McKenzie River Trail (50 miles) because there are no extended climbs and the trail follows the river. But if I'm taking on Bunchgrass Trail (a sawtooth ridgetop trail, ~35 miles) I'll leave my 20t on for sure. It is all either steep up or steep down.

    For night rides or shorter spins, I just run what I brung.

    I've had no problems, ever, with a SRAM Powerlink. Multiple Powerlinks in the same chain, even.

    --sParty
    My are all SRAM 870 w/ Powerlink. I did break one chain earlier this season, but I believe that was due to a too tight chain, and not the fault of the Powerlink or chain.

  7. #7
    Rohloff
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonw9
    My are all SRAM 870 w/ Powerlink. I did break one chain earlier this season, but I believe that was due to a too tight chain, and not the fault of the Powerlink or chain.
    Did the chain break at the Powerlink or in the middle of the chain?

  8. #8
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    The SRAM Powerlink is useless after a while; the chain stretches and the link is stuck for good. The best way to go about it owning more than one bike...

  9. #9
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    I only have / ride singlespeed on everything. I've handled this by basically going to two singlespeed bikes -

    So I have my "climber" ride, the Soulcraft geared at 20T, although I may end up having to get a 21T (recently broke a couple of ribs so off the bike a couple of months) when regaining fitness.

    Then my Vassago Jabberwocky (if they ever ship the damn thing), which I'm building to be at 18/19T for most of my local rides.

    Before doing this - I had two separate chains and two different cogs. Takes about ten-fifteen minutes to swap cogs, chains and adjust tension.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdc
    Did the chain break at the Powerlink or in the middle of the chain?
    It actually broke into 2 seperate pieces, one at the Powerlink, and one link exactly opposite.


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