SS or casette hub? why SS hub?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    FreeRider 4 Real (not!)
    Reputation: erkan's Avatar
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    SS or casette hub? why SS hub?

    Is there any real reason to get a specific SS hub instead of a cassette hub?

    OK so the wheel get a bit stronger, but John Tomac raced downhill on 8 speed casette hubs so the strength is there anyway in a regular hub.

    So why should I purchase King SS hub and limit myself when I sell it? I asume SS hubs are harder to sell if I run out of money and need to pay bills.
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  2. #2
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    well it's not like the reduced dish of an 8-speed hub gives you anything (other than the option to go back to gears)
    and it's not like SS'ers are getting LESS common... so resale shouldn't be a problem!

    ss hubs're usually lighter (well they should be!), and give you a stronger wheel since the dish side to side can be the same (or close to).
    Good tension is what keeps a good wheel straight and round.

    And for the love of GAWD don't say "well a racer did it so it's the same for me" cause you don't have a professional wrench working on your stuff after every race.
    (that comment isn't specific to SS hubs, just a pet peeve of mine when a person assumes that the constant mechanical attention a racer's bike receives will somehow translate into durability on the person's bike)

    So the question is more; why would you deliberately run a weaker set-up unless the option of gears later on was crucial?

    Dunno about you, but I don't build my wheels so I can sell them to someone else, I try and make sure my stuff is set up for me and me alone, whether it ends up in someone else's hands years down the road is never a consideration.
    (if it were a primary consideration... then I'm not really building the wheels for ME)

    and for the record no it's not a HUGE frikking difference, I've run plenty of converted 8/9 speed hubs on ss bikes, but again if you're scratch building the wheel why not do it right the first time?

    tomac also raced downhill with a rigid fork....

    0.02$ right there.
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  3. #3
    Out spokin'
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    Have both... both work fine. SS-specfic is more "SS-y."

    Run wut ya brung. S'all good.

    --Sparty
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  4. #4
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    A lot of SS hubs have higher engagement than their traditional 9 speed brethren. Don't know about Kings but I think Hopes and Hadleys do.

  5. #5
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    Yeah, JT raced downhill with a rigid fork, and also with 24" BMX wheels, so 24" wheel size is going to be the next big trend in the SS-industry. LOL you read it here first.

    He also tried an Alsop Beam so I suggest stockpiling up on them before the secret illuminati brotherhood of vintage bike community order who can purchase them on the 'bay ;-)

    One major non-problem is if you convert a normal frame to SS, what if your knees hurt, then you can convert the expensive casette King hub back to a normal 8-speed setup (or 9-speed if that is the standard today?). If you get the SS-specific hub, you need to get another 500 dollar hub and lace it up again, the hubs are much dineros here in Sweden - the land of the wikings.

    Another question, what color should you go for? I was thinking all black, but it might be boring, mango front, green back or silver on a carbon frame?
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  6. #6
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    24"ers have been done.
    cottage bike's got mag30 24" rear, doubletrack 24" front with highroller/.243 tires.
    still have a trailpimp/woodman ss rear wheel in the basement.

    you heard it in 1993 first!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  7. #7
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    Gears on a SS hub

    If you want to go with gears on a ss hub later you could try this. If you do go with the single speed hub, and if you need to sell it. I am sure it want be too hard to sell. They go really quick around my area.
    Dropbar SS Mamasita
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    CruX
    Anthem X 29
    Unknown trials bike

  8. #8
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    I think the big plus on a SS specific hub is engagement, at least in technical terrain. If you're on spinning trails, maybe not such a big deal - but when you ratchet almost as much as you spin, the extra engagement does help.
    RIDE HARD, live easy.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PutAwayWet
    I think the big plus on a SS specific hub is engagement, at least in technical terrain. If you're on spinning trails, maybe not such a big deal - but when you ratchet almost as much as you spin, the extra engagement does help.
    Hope is the only hub I know of where the SS version has quicker engagement

  10. #10
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    I love my flip flop SS Surly hub. I cant run a rear disc brake but I have 2 gears to choose from and a pretty nice V-brake on the back. I have my 36x18 (2.0) gear for cross country riding and 36x16 (2.3) gear for street/DJ/bmx track riding. The rear wheel has proved to be very strong, despite the fact that I'm abusing the hell out of it, some Bontrager rim laced with double butted spokes to the surly hub.

    The extra engagement of a WI freewheel would be very nice, especially on the shorter gear where I have to work to be extra smooth. This hub uses thread on freewheels which should be less reliable than a cassette drive freehub but both wheels have lasted a year of abuse and still put the power down as they're supposed to.

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