solo, no bag, 2x3 adventure bike up Mt June- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 29 of 29
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    solo, no bag, 2x3 adventure bike up Mt June

    I just got home today from a two day solo from home to Mount June and back. I had great weather, no rain.

    I left home 9 am tue morn, went out weyerhouser to wallace creek to high way 58 and rattlesnake rd to eagles rest and mount June.

    Mount June is 4600 ft, Springfield is 500ft. I had a nice ride out, it was a struggle climbing the Eagles Rest rd. The whole ride was 66 miles round trip.

    I had a cheeto burrito for lunch near the eagle rest trail. I had lot's of climbing to go.

    The 2x3 worked great, just like a single speed/gearie should. I wouldn't have wanted to do this ride from home an my ss. I'm not that tuff. I didn't miss all the gears that much, I have a nice wide range for touring off road.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    Only the essentials were brought

    Booze and cheetos are essentials for my solo campout.

    I only carry one water bottle and a water bottle filter, I count on finding water along the way. Part of the challenge is finding water when you need it so you don't have to haul too much weight. I am not wearing a camelbak.

    I was hoping the spring on Mount June was running, it was. I filled my bladders and put them on my bike for the last 3/4 mile straight up June, that was the hardest part. My bike was heavy with camping bike and all that water.

    Water is essential for staying warm all night without a sleeping bag or tent. Hot water will be put in the platapus bags for snuggling up to when it's freezy during the long night.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    bikes make good carts

    It's steeper than steep the last 1/2 mile up June, I put the water in trash bags hung over the frt rack, the black bladder hung on the rear. Now my bike was really heavy and I had the hardest part to go.

    I took in the views along the way, anyone know the name of this pretty flower? I enjoyed all the many flowers the whole way.

    Good views of Lookout Point Lake, Sawtooth Ridge and Hardesty. A forest service lookout tower used to be on top of Mount June.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    The hobo stove went all night

    I collected a few arm loads of sticks for the Hobo stove. The wood was dry and it was windy so it fanned the flames and really made the stove work great.

    I filled three trash bags with conifer branches for a mattress. Soon the fire was cracklin and I had hot water for hot whiskey drinks and filling my bladders.

    I am always amazed how little wood I use, I had half what I collected left over in the morning. I really enjoyed the star show and the sunrise/sunset. I saw several metors and satelites.

    I filled the whiskey bottle with water and dropped it in the stove to heat, it made an nice warmer.

    I wore all my clothes to bed, that whole black bag on the frt of my bike was warm clothes.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    I camped on an exposed rock

    I put one hot bladder between my legs and the other in my jacked. I lay on the conifer branches in the white trash bags and put a poncho over me for wind protection. I put the unfolded crazy creek chair on top on me under the poncho for insulation.

    I was nice an cozy, I wore two long sleeve jerseys, a pile vest and a rain jacked with hood and a balaclava. I wore warm tights, baggie shorts, two socks and water proof socks with warm slippers, I wore my gaiters too.

    The wind was non stop and kept blowing smoke in every direction, I had to move the stove farther away to not get smoked out. My poncho kept blowing off too, I was up all night feeding the fire and refreashing my hot bags.

    I got my usual 2ish hours of sleep. I was glad to see the dawn.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    You can't tell I had a fire all night

    the hobo stove burns wood completely, this is all the ash I had after burning wood for 12 hrs. I left my campsite like I found it.

    I was packed up an on the trail by 9am, I took the Lost Creek trail back. I had never been on that trail before, I loved it.

    Fog was sitting in the valley floors early this morning. I was home by 1:30, the ride home was a lot easier.

    I'm already looking forward to my next adventure.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,657

    Dude, write a book...

    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    ...

    I'm already looking forward to my next adventure.
    ...I'll buy it.

    I'm already looking forward to your next adventure, too.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  8. #8
    E !
    E ! is offline
    .........................
    Reputation: E !'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,093

    excellent post

    Very cool story. i knew i liked these boards for something. here it is. Well written.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    17
    Thank you for sharing your adventure. Great pictures to go with the story, or is it the other way around?


  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    168
    thats cool
    2003 Kona Kikapu

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FrontRanger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,469
    Quote Originally Posted by brschmid
    thats cool
    ok time to get some details on the creation of that Hobo stove. I am liking the practicality of it as well as the LNT capabilities.

  12. #12
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,657

    Yeah!

    Quote Originally Posted by FrontRanger
    ok time to get some details on the creation of that Hobo stove. I am liking the practicality of it as well as the LNT capabilities.
    C'mon lef-T, we all want a hobo stove. Give us a schematic, please.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  13. #13
    Fahrrad fahren
    Reputation: Hjalti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    301
    Nice report. Thanks!
    Fixing Frederick Coasting Carroll Wandering Washington

  14. #14
    Who are the brain police?
    Reputation: Locoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,111
    The Who - Glittering Girl
    Ween - The Grobe
    Yellowman - Strong Me Strong
    all your base are belong to us

  15. #15
    RidetoLive,BuildtoRide
    Reputation: Squirrely1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    198

    That was

    an AWESOME read Lef-t I haven't been on the board for awhile, now I'm back after that great trek>

    Peace
    I'm only as fast as the previous nights 12 pack, and as crazy as Einstein

    www.cyclinglyfestyle.blogspot.com
    http://cyclingtattoogallery.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
    Who are the brain police?
    Reputation: Locoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,111
    The Who - Glittering Girl
    Ween - The Grobe
    Yellowman - Strong Me Strong
    all your base are belong to us

  17. #17
    dirty hippy mountainbiker
    Reputation: wolfy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,146
    So is this the new singlespeeding? No sleeping bag and a wood stove for heat? Next there will be a sticky thread called, "Why Sleep in a Garbage Bag?"

    I like my 2 lb down bag and Jetboil just fine. I mean holy crap! Was all that water for heating?!?!? I use this sometimes for water.

    Glad you had a nice trip! I guess it does sound better than what I did Monday and Tuesday even with the garbage bags.

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,041
    i love your adventures, please keep on posting them! and i too would love a quick and dirty on how to make my own hobo stove!

    i could really use that in my own backyard for sittin around with friends at night enjoying cold one's! and for camping of course...

  19. #19
    highly visible
    Reputation: GlowBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,179
    Another great report, Lef-T. Looks like fun.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    thanks for the link

    Quote Originally Posted by Locoman
    I came up with the idea years ago, we used trash cans with a big hole cut in the side for all our campfires in the White Mountains of Arizona.

    My design is so simple anyone can make it for nothing from trash. It's the single speed of wood stoves.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    It's a coffee can cut in half

    Quote Originally Posted by FrontRanger
    ok time to get some details on the creation of that Hobo stove. I am liking the practicality of it as well as the LNT capabilities.
    I drilled little holes where the sides overlap and insert a bent spoke through with a nipple threaded on.

    I cut the bottom slightly smaller to fit inside, two spokes cross at the bottom so it can't fall out.

    I didn't do any scientific testing, it works well enough as it is. The sides of the can reflect the heat back into the fire, that's one reason it works so well.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    I like my hobo stove because.......

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy
    So is this the new singlespeeding? No sleeping bag and a wood stove for heat? Next there will be a sticky thread called, "Why Sleep in a Garbage Bag?"

    I like my 2 lb down bag and Jetboil just fine. I mean holy crap! Was all that water for heating?!?!? I use this sometimes for water.

    Glad you had a nice trip! I guess it does sound better than what I did Monday and Tuesday even with the garbage bags.

    -M
    I don't need to carry fuel, it can melt enormous amounts of snow,make unlimited amounts of hot water and purified water,warm your bones,less overall polution (drilling, refining,transporting),free to make,and a wood fire is magical, you can't resisted staring into a fire.

    Your jet stove is nice and light, but you need to carry fuel and you can't waste it boiling water or melting lot's of snow. It's fun to stay with basics.
    Homemade crap great fun to use.

    I love the challege of finding wood, keeping a fire going, watching the fire helps pass the time. I love it's simplicity and usefulness. And it didn't cost anything to make. I't's way better than a campfire unless your at Barbie Camp

    On the down side your clothes and gear all smell like a smoke when the wind is crazy like it was up there. It is a chore to maintain. Your pot is all black and it might burn the woods down in fire season.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    109
    don't you get worried about being attacked by a bear/serial killer/etc?

    i love your reports!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    742

    Yeah I worry but I don't let it ruin the whole experience

    Quote Originally Posted by alexb618
    don't you get worried about being attacked by a bear/serial killer/etc?

    i love your reports!
    I worry about getting creamed by a logging truck or a wild redneck in a peekup truck.

    I worry about taking a wrong trun and not finding water where I expect it.

    I worry about Poison Oak and Ticks.

    I worry about falling on pavement at 30 miles an hour and getting skinned alive.

    I worry about the hot spot on my right heel

    I worry about forgeting something like a tube.

    I worry about getting 20 spokes riped out of my frt wheel by a random stick.

    I worry about falling off the down slope while traversing a wicked steep slope.

    I worry about being stobed like a bug in a bug collection by a random stob.

    I worry about sticks in the eye and greesy off camber sticks, and bridges

    I worry about hikers not being friendly like me because I'm their enemy.

    I worry about a limb blown from a tree top on a windy day crushing or wounding me.

    I worry about head winds, long slow climbs, bonking,mechanicals,stuff falling off, my rack bolts breaking, why do my disc brakes squeak and chirp, what's all these creaks and growns my bike is making? Blown sidewalls, blown freehubs, fried brake pads, blown shocks.

    Geeze I worry a lot.........I try to be safe and aware of all these worries and still free my mind and let nature unfold, I'm still blown away by all the beauty on this place. I'm drawn by the adventure and exploring a new place.

  25. #25
    try driving your car less
    Reputation: jh_on_the_cape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,097

    you rock!

    thanks for sharing.

    although the cheeto burrito scares me. try a PB and honey burrito next time.

    do you bring toilet paper?

    have you found anything edible in your local forest? that's the next step.

    before we had kids, sometimes i would sleep out on our deck, just for the hell of it. it freaked my wife out a little. but she sort of understands. when my kids are a little bigger, i look forward to camping out in the backyard woods.

    fire is caveman TV.

    is the hobo stove titanium? how much does it weigh? is it flexy? does it bottom out going off huge drops? does it work while watching TV and talking on the phone? does it come in carbon fiber? is it made in USA or taiwan? are the spokes butted? nipples alloy or brass? are they colored? do you get wireless internet up there? did your blackberry work? what about porn?
    Only boring people get bored.

  26. #26
    dirty hippy mountainbiker
    Reputation: wolfy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,146
    East vs West: Most of the places I go are either over 10k feet which means Fires are prohibited by wilderness regulations, or covered in snow/above treeline. Also burning a fire all night is risky out here.

    I wonder if that stove of yours would be good for travel. A lot of places around the world still rely on wood for heat...

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  27. #27
    highly visible
    Reputation: GlowBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,179
    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    I worry about getting creamed by a logging truck or a wild redneck in a peekup truck.

    ...
    Good list. Mine is similar:
    • Running out of water and not being able to find more, especially in the desert.
    • Getting hurt (from a fall, burst appendix or something else unpredictable) and not being able to get out on my own.
    • Decapitating myself by riding through an unmarked cable gate stretched across some old dirt road. Note how high this is on my list. Had a close call a couple years ago.
    • Hypothermia (from unexpected weather, underpacking, stove failure or getting a piece of critical gear wet). #1 killer in the NW mountains, by far. Not #1 on my list because most of the deaths are easily preventable, but still always a risk.
    • Riding off a cliff, or crashing through spring snow into a stream underneath.
    • Falling limbs (and/or powerlines) on windy days.
    • Lightning.
    • Having a stem, bar or front QR fail on me, or having something fall into the front wheel, causing a crash.
    • Getting lost.
    • People. Malevolent rednecks. Drunks. Careless RV and truck drivers. Hunters.
    • Multiple stings from stirring up a wasps' nest.
    • Poison oak or ivy.
    • Bulls. Fortunately the ones I've encountered have always let me pass. So far.
    • Loose dogs. Got chased by a pit bull once on a road ride.
    • Rocks falling down cliffs.
    • Cougars.
    • Ticks.
    • Bull elk in rutting season.
    • Bears. Low on the list. Leave our Black bears alone, don't be stupid with food, stay off the line between Ma and the Kids, and they leave you alone.
    • Rattlesnakes. In my 20-ish trips to the Oregon Desert over the years, I've only encountered them twice, and our Pacific Rattlers aren't particularly poisonous.
    • Scorpions. Had one run across my campsite in the Mickey Basin last year. Also common in SW Oregon. Fortunately the Northern Scorpion's sting, like that of our snakes, is not very toxic.
    • Coyotes. ZERO danger to adults, but a real danger to my young child.
    • Rabid critters. Very minor risk these days, but still makes the list because my aunt was killed by rabies.
    • Skunks.
    • Porcupines. Never seen one, but we do have them.
    • Wolverines. Don't expect to ever see one, but we do have them.


    The worries are all worth it for the adventure. Prepare for what you can, and let someone know where to look for you if you don't return on time, and you can minimize the risks.

    Besides, there are lots of things I don't worry about: equipment failures except those that can cause a crash. I can handle those. Also grizzlies, wild boars, moose, wolves, fire ants, killer bees, barbed plants like Cholla, Mojave greens, water moccasins, alligators/crocs/caimans, polar bears, Sasquatch, trolls, flying saucers, Gila monsters or Komodo dragons. I'm not aware that we regularly have any of those here.
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 06-22-2006 at 03:23 PM.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  28. #28
    highly visible
    Reputation: GlowBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,179
    Quote Originally Posted by jh_on_the_cape
    thanks for sharing.

    do you bring toilet paper?

    although the cheeto burrito scares me. try a PB and honey burrito next time.

    have you found anything edible in your local forest? that's the next step.
    I can see why you asked the TP question immediately after commenting on the cheeto burrito. Talk about exit wounds.

    My knowledge of local wild edible stuff is mostly limited to berries, but boy do we have a lot of those: salmonberries (available NOW!), thimbleberries (soon), strawberries, raspberries, blackcaps, gooseberries, juneberries, blueberries, huckleberries, and of course the invasive himalayan blackberry. Most of them yummy. Also chanterelles, though I'm not a big fan. I know there are lots of edible grubs, tree bark, etc., but I wouldn't know what to look for.
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 06-22-2006 at 03:21 PM.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  29. #29
    Master Gardener
    Reputation: Velokid1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,347
    Greetings from Arizona. I hear you have a little experience in these parts.

    1. What's this "water" stuff you speak of? I am unfamiliar with it.

    2. Are you married and/or w/ children? (I am... and wondering how you manage to pull off the little adventures. Tips appreciated.LOL)

    3. How did you manage to talk said S.O. into relocating to OR? I'm currently working on this... you'd think the fact that it ISN'T 60% retirees, Republican and that animals and plants actually GROW in Oregon would be enough to convince my wife, but alas it has not.

    Peace.

    Greg

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.