solo campout with no sleeping bag in the northwet- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    solo campout with no sleeping bag in the northwet

    I was inspired by glow boy to see if I could get through the night with no sleeping bag. I practiced fire building and came up with the hobo stove.

    I am now confident I can make it comfortable through the worst northwet night in the woods.

    I rode my surly 3x3 about 30 miles from home to Joe's Peak, I pushed it to the top and spent a nice evening on top.

    All I brought was the hobo stove, a space blanket, some trash bags and my crazy creek chair. Some food, water and warm clothes.

    I loved it up there, I was warm and had a great veiw of windy pass, sour grass, saddle blanket, tire, and clover patch mountains.

    Joe's peak trail is very ridable downhill, it's well maintained and had only a few blowdowns. There are some nice rock formations up there and the view is of the upper alpine and tire mountain trails.

    No motor vehicles were used, I rode right from my house in east springfield. It was a pretty ride, streams the whole way and very little traffic.

    My bike has three gears, I have to get off unbolt the rear wheel and move the chain on to another gear to shift. I used the 36x14 to ride the paved 30 miles out there. The trail has a 14% grade and climbs 1700 feet in 2.3 miles. I had to pack all my water up there from cabin creek. I walked the whole way up.

    The hobo stove is key in keeping a fire going and not wasteing much fuel. I can boil water fast with wet wood and easily maitain a fire all night on very little wood. It burns the wood completely. I have built many fires in the wetest conditions I could find while it was raining with my coffee can stove. Chain lube makes a quick fire starter. White Lightning burns like gas.
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  2. #2
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    rocks, hobo stove, sunset, shiggy's fav tires

    there are some very cool rock formations about 1/2 mile from the bottom.

    shiggy hates racing slicks, they are better than knobbys for 60 miles of pavement.

    my break down fire in a can.

    you can see fall creek res. from the top at sunset.
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  3. #3
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    along the jasper rd, winberry area, da map

    nice country, the whole ride was awesome. I'm startin to get the hang of this country, it's super complicated.
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  4. #4
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    food, clothing and fire

    All I have to do is sit in my chair and feed sticks into the can, with hot water, I eat and be happy.

    the stove breaks down and is held together with spokes and nipples

    I fill some platapus bladders with hot water, slip them in my coat and I'm toasty.

    I filled some trash bags with dead grass and ferns for insulation.

    There was a nice moon that evening.
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  5. #5
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    I wonder if I can fill my truck's tank with White Lightning? At least for now, unleaded is a little cheaper.

    Sweet ride Lef-T. You should post these on the Oregon page also. You've been doing some really cool adventure riding in your own backyard. Good job keeping the whole ride human powered. It's an inspiration for when I'm ready to get tough.
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  6. #6
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    This is great but.................

    ..........according to the rumor I heard you spent three nights out there and it rained/snowed/was miserable the whole time.

    Whatever. In any case you da man, lef-t!

    --Sparty
    Last edited by Sparticus; 06-13-2006 at 06:21 AM.
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  7. #7
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    f-in cool man! way to put the adventure back in mountain biking!!!

  8. #8
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    dude

    that rocks!
    nice garbage bag trick too

  9. #9
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    Very Cool..............

    Lef-T
    Excellent post! Nice to see somebody 'sack up', get out and try something.
    Very thoughtful planning, and ingenious solutions to 'survival' problems.
    Especially like the Platypus bladder idea. Simple, but very effective.
    Thanks again for the writeup.

    C.

  10. #10
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    Nice post! Did the bugs leave you alone?

    (I couldn't imagine not using a bug net.)
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  11. #11
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    damn that's a really cool adventure and very nice pics.

    I recently packed my SS for a flatland camping trip. Only took one backpack with tent/sleeping bag/matress/stove and a bar bag with food with me. Very nice to go minimal camping. Altough a sleeping bag is something I will take with me.

    Maybe the special tent hammocks are an idea? No bugs/light/small.

    My packing list:

    TNF Mayfly solo tent (about 9 years old and still going strong)
    Coleman bambusa sleeping bag (fold down to about 20/20/10 cm's )
    Thermarest micro matress (folds down to 20/20/10 cm's)
    MSR whisperlite stove (burns like hell)
    All this bound together in a 20 litre backpack which i put on a el cheapo rack.

    Camelback mule with water and bike supplies
    agu bar bag with toiletries and some expedition food.

  12. #12
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    I did spend three days out and it rained

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    ..........according to the rumor I heard you spent three nights out there and it rained/snowed/was miserable the whole time.

    Whatever. In any case you da man, lef-t!

    --Sparty
    A few weeks later, in the middle of the week just before momorial day I rode alpine and winberry in the rain.

    I camped the first night wet, cold and hungry at Saddle Blanket trailhead. I got water from a puddle of melted snow, put up my tarp, got the fire going and settled in.

    I collected wet wood on the ground, cut and split some and had a fire going. I brought a bivy sack and a thermarest mattress. Still no sleeping bag.

    The hobo stove warmed me and dried my clothes. It rained all that night and all the next day. I could not have maintained a fire for hours without the coffee can stove. Wiskey in hot drinks helps too.

    It would have been miserable without some planning and practice.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    I was inspired by glow boy to see if I could get through the night with no sleeping bag.
    Ha! Happy to be your muse.

    Awesome adventure camping you're doing there. Wish I could be doing the same. Keep us posted on your epics and your evolution in equipment.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  14. #14
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    NIce Post!

    I have always enjoyed your posts lef-t. Thanks
    Why not use a sleeping bag?

  15. #15
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    Do you ride with a sleeping bag on a fun ride?

    Quote Originally Posted by SSweetleaf
    I have always enjoyed your posts lef-t. Thanks
    Why not use a sleeping bag?
    What if you're cought out overnight on a fun ride with no bag? I was wondering what I could do to be comfy and warm in that situation. I was just testing my skills and trying to keep it simple. I've done the bag a zillion times, I never tried the trash bags before.

    The main thing is keeping the fire going without spending hrs collecting fire wood. All I really needed was the hobo stove, the chair, water bags, space blanket and food were optional comforts I allowed.

    I really didn't have any room for a sleeping bag with no rack on my bike, as it was I had crap tied all over it. I could have rode my camping bike with a rack but it has a gear shifter and the only reason I rode the surly 3x3 was so I could post on my favorite site, ss.

    I just went solo camping again, this time I had a sleeping bag.

  16. #16
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    building fires in the northwet is very hard

    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy
    Ha! Happy to be your muse.

    Awesome adventure camping you're doing there. Wish I could be doing the same. Keep us posted on your epics and your evolution in equipment.
    Your comment a while back about hyperthermia was right on. Fires are next to impossible without some tools. The trash bag idea is unreliable, someplaces don't have anything to collect.

    I went to GI Joes and bought this little worlds fastest pocket saw for $15, I just cut some 3" diameter sticks 6" long and split them with my chisel. That solves the where to find dry wood issue. Once the fire gets going wet wood can be piled on top of the stove to predry it.

    I have started lots of practice fires in the rain with wet wood collected off the ground. It's easy and works everytime in the nastiest conditions. I've never been able to burn all the wood I've collected for the night. You only need a fraction of the wood a campfire needs.

    My latest hobo stove is take apart so it easily fits in a camelbak, with the saw and chisel.

    I love the crazy creek chair for staying comfy and dry on the wet ground anywhere. It's fun to practice fire building in harsh conditions, it sure is harder than Arizona.
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  17. #17
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    Wow, that's pretty rugged! You're definitely more ambitious/adventurous than I am! I'm impressed.

    Say, do you own a lawnmower? Just kidding.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    Y... 3" diameter sticks 6" long and split them with my chisel. ...
    That isn't a titanium chisel, is it?

    --Sparty
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  19. #19
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    That's totally cool lef-ty.
    Love, Impy

  20. #20
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    You could have gone a lot lighter and used a sleeping bag. Why not spring for the good stuff and be comfy? Do you really need a stove that big when a jet boil will do? That would save a lot of weight and effort. Check out poncho liners that are issued by the the U.S military. Light and versatile!
    Great pics and kudos for effort!
    I am immune to your disdain.

  21. #21
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    I own lot's of high tech gear, I still like old fashion fire.

    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    You could have gone a lot lighter and used a sleeping bag. Why not spring for the good stuff and be comfy? Do you really need a stove that big when a jet boil will do? That would save a lot of weight and effort. Check out poncho liners that are issued by the the U.S military. Light and versatile!
    Great pics and kudos for effort!
    I've made a huge $$$ investment in camping gear, I even have a gas stove. You might notice everything in the pictures are high quality gear.

    Can your jet stove dry your shirt and pants while it cooks your potatoes, boils your water, and keep your spirits high while you sit on a mountain top all night alone?

    Look at all that free fuel laying on the ground, pick it up and turn it into free solar heat.

    Hobo stoves are kinda like single speeds, so simple, dependable and fun to use.

    A tent forces you inside for hours with nothing to do, I feel cut off from the reason I'm outdoors in the first place.

    I just returned from another adventure, this time I took my bling bling gear on my 2x3 adventure bike. Conditions were cold and wet, I had a great time again.

    I love the fact this part of Oregon is covered with unlimited wood and water, I can travel in safety with my hobo stove technology.
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  22. #22
    Nat
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    What's the white device hanging around your neck?

  23. #23
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    The key is right here.

    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t

    It would have been miserable without some planning and practice.

    You have the essense of the issue right here. It helps when the practice is fun.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    I've made a huge $$$ investment in camping gear, I even have a gas stove. You might notice everything in the pictures are high quality gear.

    Can your jet stove dry your shirt and pants while it cooks your potatoes, boils your water, and keep your spirits high while you sit on a mountain top all night alone?

    Look at all that free fuel laying on the ground, pick it up and turn it into free solar heat.

    Hobo stoves are kinda like single speeds, so simple, dependable and fun to use.

    A tent forces you inside for hours with nothing to do, I feel cut off from the reason I'm outdoors in the first place.


    I love the fact this part of Oregon is covered with unlimited wood and water, I can travel in safety with my hobo stove technology.
    awesome thanks for sharing! I did a one month backcountry solo bike trip in baja with no tent. at first, it is so difficult to sleep out with no tent. something psychological. I knew it would not rain and there was nothing that my tent could really protect me from. I did have a sleeping bag. After a while, I got used to it. It really opened my eyes to the need for shelter innate to all of us. One morning I woke up and a deer was licking my face.

    There is so much hi-tech gear, it's awesome to eschew it all and go minimal. I love the hobo stove!
    Only boring people get bored.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    Can your jet stove dry your shirt and pants while it cooks your potatoes, boils your water, and keep your spirits high while you sit on a mountain top all night alone?

    Look at all that free fuel laying on the ground, pick it up and turn it into free solar heat.

    Hobo stoves are kinda like single speeds, so simple, dependable and fun to use.

    A tent forces you inside for hours with nothing to do, I feel cut off from the reason I'm outdoors in the first place.

    I just returned from another adventure, this time I took my bling bling gear on my 2x3 adventure bike. Conditions were cold and wet, I had a great time again.

    I love the fact this part of Oregon is covered with unlimited wood and water, I can travel in safety with my hobo stove technology.
    I really agree that a wood fire is very good at keeping up the spirits. And those are really nice pics. It's pity that there are almost no really large forests in the netherlands where this is possible. But you definately seem to be enjoying yourself. BTW: Do yu have any close ups of the hobo stove? I want to try to make one.

  26. #26
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    That is too cool. Nice job! One thought, have you tried a B.O.B. trailer? I have friends who swear by them. Supposedly much easier to ride with then weighing down a bike with all the gear. You can even get them with suspension!

    In any event, enjoy!!

  27. #27
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    I'm Jealous...

    I'd love to rough it like that... but wifey won't let me leave the house without my scarf and mittens.

    If I were to do it, I'd probably bring my Whisperlite camp stove, a nylon hammock, and a tarp... and a sleeping bag. maybe even one of these:
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    Don't confuse me with facts, my mind's already made up.

  28. #28
    wait a minute....
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    What is that?

    Quote Originally Posted by SwollenYak
    I'd love to rough it like that... but wifey won't let me leave the house without my scarf and mittens.

    If I were to do it, I'd probably bring my Whisperlite camp stove, a nylon hammock, and a tarp... and a sleeping bag. maybe even one of these:
    Where do you find one?

  29. #29
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    Too many blow downs for BOB

    Quote Originally Posted by one1spede
    That is too cool. Nice job! One thought, have you tried a B.O.B. trailer? I have friends who swear by them. Supposedly much easier to ride with then weighing down a bike with all the gear. You can even get them with suspension!

    In any event, enjoy!!
    There are always some blow downs to deal with on most trails, especially early in the season. With a bob you have to disconnect to get through some blow downs

    I have used bob's for years, they are awesome haulers.
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  30. #30
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    My music box

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    What's the white device hanging around your neck?
    I had some Hank 3 and Cash down loaded from a coworkers collection, I really dug the new tunes.

  31. #31
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    Wow Tom, that is inspiring! I can see you've been doing some thinking and DOing about this.
    My first thought was WOW...my second was, hmmm...wouldn't it be cool to ride up to....from my house...just like that!
    Thanks!
    bob
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  32. #32
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    Check out my post on the Oregon forum

    Quote Originally Posted by red-haze.com
    Wow Tom, that is inspiring! I can see you've been doing some thinking and DOing about this.
    My first thought was WOW...my second was, hmmm...wouldn't it be cool to ride up to....from my house...just like that!
    Thanks!
    bob
    Thanks Bob, you all inspire me. Glad to return the favor. I have done three campouts from my house in the last month, it's nice to not worry about who's looking in your vehicle while you're out on a ride.

    I just posted my Alpine-Winberry three day rain campout on the Oregon forum

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jh_on_the_cape
    awesome thanks for sharing! I did a one month backcountry solo bike trip in baja with no tent. at first, it is so difficult to sleep out with no tent. something psychological. I knew it would not rain and there was nothing that my tent could really protect me from. I did have a sleeping bag. After a while, I got used to it. It really opened my eyes to the need for shelter innate to all of us. One morning I woke up and a deer was licking my face.

    There is so much hi-tech gear, it's awesome to eschew it all and go minimal. I love the hobo stove!
    Was a deer really licking your face?

    I just camped with no tent for the first time ever last weekend. It is a wierd feeling at first to just be out in the open at night. Can't beat the view of the stars though. I did have a sleeping bag, just a normal one, nothing expensive. I was in the upper peninsula of Michigan and even though its the middle of June, it got down to 40 degrees at night. I was very surprised I didn't really get cold at all. No fire either. I used a fishing hat with an attached mosquito net tucked into my shirt to keep the bugs (ticks) off. The next night it got down to 34 degrees and I decided to use a tent, with the same sleeping bag and again I wasn't cold.
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  34. #34
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    Excellent...

    Way to go on the setup and effort Tom! That's the way to travel singletrack by bike. I'll have to look into the stove more, really a key to entertainment and simplicty. These are some great posts that many want to do but never attempt.

    Thanks man,
    Lou

  35. #35
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    simple is better in the boonies

    Quote Originally Posted by lswing
    Way to go on the setup and effort Tom! That's the way to travel singletrack by bike. I'll have to look into the stove more, really a key to entertainment and simplicty. These are some great posts that many want to do but never attempt.

    Thanks man,
    Lou
    Thanks for the encouraging words, I am heading up Mount June in the morning, solo no bag again. I will post more when I get back.

    Tom

  36. #36
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    speaking of stoves...
    while this certaily doesn't have the same appeal of a wood stove it's a cheap way to get at the hot food/water aspect
    penny stove

  37. #37
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    Interesting but I don't want to carry fuel. I get great pleasure converting a simple wet stick on the ground into heat, with simple tools and a coffee can. Simple is better.

    I have an unlimited supply of wet sticks in these parts. With my magic can I can turn a stick into solar heat. The suns energy is in every peice of wood, it's easy to convert a stick into fuel. I can keep it going all night with little work.

  38. #38
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    man, just love reading your posts about this. seems like a good time. maybe somethign to look forward to doing here in Texas when it gets a little cooler out.

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