So are tubeless tyres/tires still popular? What's the general consensus?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. So are tubeless tyres/tires still popular? What's the general consensus?

    Hi

    I'm awaiting the delivery of my new Soul Cycles Hooligan SS frame and fork this week, it's been about 2 years since I rode and at the time tubeless tyres were all the rage, I used to have Hutchinson Pythons on my Dekerf and they were a really good tyre, however I'm just wondering was tubeless a passing fad, whats the best setup and general consensus on them nowadays?


  2. #2
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    Here in Phoenix AZ, many, if not most people are running tubeless. The majority are running ghetto style, either the split-tube method, or the pipe/gorilla tape method. Use almost any rim and tire you want. If you live in a rocky area, go with 2x sidewall tires.

    If you are going rigid, I would highly suggest going tubeless with lower air pressure.

  3. #3
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    Mountainflow is on the money....TUBELESS tires, those marked as UST are likely what you remember , but they are pretty much obsolete now with products like STANS NO TUBES and a few simular products. UST tires had a bead that locked into the UST rims but it added WEIGHT, alot of weight. The split tube way is getting crazy popular right now with mountainbike action and bicycling mags both running 'how-to"s in recent issues.

    Use whatever wheels you have, get a light , high volume tire and go tubeless

  4. #4
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    This months Mountain Bike had a good article on tubeless. They ended with this; "Our predictions: With refinement, tubeless tires will be the enthusiasts' future. But that's it. It's too messy, application specific and expensive for the masses. UST is viable only if the weights keep coming down". Pretty much what scyule and mountainflow said. I recently went to 650b tubeless with a rigid fork and they were a significant improvement..
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  5. #5
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    This is really helpful guys thanks.

    I ran UST on my Mavic 819s last time but I also once used a Stans converter kit on some 517 rims with Panaracer Tyres...

  6. #6
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    been running stans tires on stans rims with stans sealant for almost 2 yrs now. Zero flats. Nuff said.

  7. #7
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    It is a passing fad. In the forums I frequent most, SS, 29er, wheels & tires, the same questions about tubeless pass every day, sometimes up to five times a day. People ask and ask and ask, it just passes and passes. Seems more and more manufacturers are coming out with TLR (TubeLess Ready) rims and tires. Too bad there is no interest in a great invention. I have not had a flat in over two years on four tubeless wheel sets and I plan to go back to tubes so I can have the fun of changing tubes two or three times each ride. I do not want to be using a fad product way past the peak of its popularity.
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  8. #8
    still riding
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    absolutely not a fad. I've used ust and non ust tires converted with stans sealant and rim tape on ust and non ust rims and had success with all combos. no flats.

  9. #9
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    I have been running tubeless for about 7 or 8 years. I've had 2 flats in that time. There is a little more upkeep on tubeless, but it's worth it.

  10. #10
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    always a naysayer

    I still refuse to believe that cutting your tube in half and adding goo is saving weight.
    It seems laughable.

    My friend Matt runs Stans Notubes and loves it. All the guys at the shop told him it was great. "Dude, why spend $5 on a tube that might pop when for $45 this goo will keep ya rollin brah?" I borrowed his front wheel for a ride to test out his tire. I burped the wheel, lost Stans and serious air pressure. That was the second time I had ridden tubeless and was oddly the second time I had burped a tubeless tire, running 15-25psi. I love running low psi, maybe cause trials ridding, I don't know. I run lower psi than most everyone I ride with, since I'm fully rigid 26".

    Tubes don't fail often, but when they do, it is easy and clean to replace trail side.
    no chain no gain.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    I still refuse to believe that cutting your tube in half and adding goo is saving weight.
    It seems laughable.
    Definitely not lighter. Maybe the pipe tape method is a little bit lighter, but not much. The biggest reason to run Stans tubeless is to go lower air pressure without pinch flatting, and for flat protection.
    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    Tubes don't fail often, but when they do, it is easy and clean to replace trail side.
    Tubes definitely are simpler and less of a PITA, but the lower pressure and flat protection are worth it for many people.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    I run lower psi than most everyone I ride with, since I'm fully rigid 26".
    Don't want to be a smart ass but maybe you need to kick that psi up a notch or two

    As far as flats go, it's not just about the wheel setup. Its how you ride your bike. Do you read the terrain ahead and ride a "light" front wheel when required? Think about it. We all know somebody who is always getting flats. That my friends is the reason why.

  13. #13
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    I run tubeless on all but one of my mtn bikes. I'm 210lbs and way too susceptible to pinch flats to run regular tubes. On my 26" bikes, some have UST tires and rims, some have converted rims and UST tires. My sole 29er has Stans rim, tape sealant and non-tubeless tires. I don't like having to use strips and tape, UST rims and tires worked best, but since there are no UST 29er rims I'll continue doing what I'm doing. FWIW the DT-Swiss conversion kits work well at first, but the rim strips eventually stop sticking to the double-sided tape, squirm around, sealant leaks past the tape and in the case of the 5.1D rim + conversion kit, UST tires are really hard to mount.

    Morgan

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    I still refuse to believe that cutting your tube in half and adding goo is saving weight.
    It seems laughable.

    My friend Matt runs Stans Notubes and loves it. All the guys at the shop told him it was great. "Dude, why spend $5 on a tube that might pop when for $45 this goo will keep ya rollin brah?" I borrowed his front wheel for a ride to test out his tire. I burped the wheel, lost Stans and serious air pressure. That was the second time I had ridden tubeless and was oddly the second time I had burped a tubeless tire, running 15-25psi. I love running low psi, maybe cause trials ridding, I don't know. I run lower psi than most everyone I ride with, since I'm fully rigid 26".

    Tubes don't fail often, but when they do, it is easy and clean to replace trail side.
    Like anything else, I think it's a matter of how the wheel is put together. Stans is very clear that some combinations work better than others and some won't work at all. I firmly believe that Stans system is the best thought out, even better than UST. The rim has a wider bench area (some rims don't even have a bench area), which helps mounting the tires and the bead "socket" causes the tire bead to snap and lock into place, which is very resistant to "burping". The system only fails due to weak tire beads, and they recommend wire beads, especially on 29ers wheels, but I have had no trouble with my foldable Nevegals on a 650b. The problem with the split tube route is, it addresses only the sealant problem without addressing keeping the tire on the rim. Stans seems to have concentrated on keeping the tire on the wheel and than letting their sealant due the sealing work.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  15. #15
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    Hope "do what feels good"

    Quote Originally Posted by markgoldsmith
    Don't want to be a smart ass but maybe you need to kick that psi up a notch or two

    As far as flats go, it's not just about the wheel setup. Its how you ride your bike. Do you read the terrain ahead and ride a "light" front wheel when required? Think about it. We all know somebody who is always getting flats. That my friends is the reason why.
    you said it. I rode trials before I ever rode xc. Good luck talking the trials guys into tubeless. and no one is running pressure as low as they are. I've watched tires fold and beads almost roll right off trials wheels. I had psi lower than joe blow could register. and thats how I liked it. But I dont remember many flat issues. riding xc I am realizing that I can run higher psi if I run a wider tire and not really effect cushion or rolling resistance. of course marginal weight is gained but that is hardly worth mentioning. So that's what I've been doing. 2.35 front and 2.2 rear on my 26" rigid SS.

    I weigh 165lbs and consider myself to have good handling skills, I'm not pinching tubes personally. And unless you are, then you are solving a problem that doesn't exist with an over complicated method. I love the K.I.S.S. system myself. but I am also simple minded.

    at the end of the day- you ride your bike, and i'll ride mine. as long as we are both smiling then it's all fine.
    no chain no gain.

  16. #16
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    I'm on tubes here as well. Two flats in the past 3 years that tubeless wouldn't have solved. 1&2: sidewall gashes leading to tube blowouts. having a tube in there probably allowed me to ride further with the cut in the tire that tubeless would have. 3: 26 x 3" downhill tire not fully seated on a 70mm wide rim at super low pressures led to tire rotation, which led to a pinch flat. If it was tubeless, the air would never have stayed in the tire in the first place.

    I run comparatively high pressure(30-50 psi), and have no problems with traction or comfort.

    I also come from a trials background.

  17. #17
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    To throw a wrench in things, Eclipse's new tube has finally started to trickle in to stores over in Europe, and hopefully they'll be available in the US soon. What's special about them is a 26x2.3 tube only weighs 56g, is extremely flat resistant, and is said to roll and feel the same as tubeless.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=490356

    For someone who's refused to go tubeless because of the mess and hassle, I can't wait to get my hands on a set of those.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    I'm on tubes here as well. Two flats in the past 3 years that tubeless wouldn't have solved. 1&2: sidewall gashes leading to tube blowouts. having a tube in there probably allowed me to ride further with the cut in the tire that tubeless would have. 3: 26 x 3" downhill tire not fully seated on a 70mm wide rim at super low pressures led to tire rotation, which led to a pinch flat. If it was tubeless, the air would never have stayed in the tire in the first place.

    I run comparatively high pressure(30-50 psi), and have no problems with traction or comfort.

    I also come from a trials background.
    my brother
    no chain no gain.

  19. #19
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    I ride tubeless. I love it - don't intend to go tubed again at all.
    :wq

  20. #20
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    I can probably count the number of flats on one hand I have had while riding with tubes in the last 19 years. I never flatted during a race. I want to try tubeless just to see, but really, for the riding here in central/eastern VA, tubes are fine.
    Last edited by TiGeo; 12-31-2009 at 05:43 PM.
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  21. #21
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    After walking out a time or 2 after pinching my last tube, it's been stan's ever since. I will never go back to tubes.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    To throw a wrench in things, Eclipse's new tube has finally started to trickle in to stores over in Europe, and hopefully they'll be available in the US soon. What's special about them is a 26x2.3 tube only weighs 56g, is extremely flat resistant, and is said to roll and feel the same as tubeless.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=490356

    For someone who's refused to go tubeless because of the mess and hassle, I can't wait to get my hands on a set of those.

    Now those look interesting!

    I've used the Eclipse Tubeless Kits (not Stans, my mistake!) and they worked pretty well too. I like UST just the range of tyres used to be pretty limited when I last rode...

  23. #23
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    Tubeless believer here! Yeah, @10speedbiopacefreewheel, even all my fixed mtb stuff.

    Three 29ers, five wheelsets, all with Stans. For me, I can tell the tread compliance to the ground, plus the flat protection. In the summers here, I used to carry 3-5 tubes cause of this little bastiges


    it was not unusual to get 3 flats in 10 miles. Now, I do not get flats.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

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  24. #24
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    good discussion,

    slocaus: we got those here too. we call em goat heads. they are indeed pricks!

    I'm not trying to change anyone here, just circulating data.


    another question though: you guys running tubeless, still carry a spare tube, no?
    at the end of the day, in tubes we trust.
    no chain no gain.

  25. #25
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    two tubes carried on every ride!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    good discussion,

    slocaus: we got those here too. we call em goat heads. they are indeed pricks!

    I'm not trying to change anyone here, just circulating data.


    another question though: you guys running tubeless, still carry a spare tube, no?
    at the end of the day, in tubes we trust.
    Goat heads, puncture vine, @#$%&! and other names.

    Yes, always a spare tube, glueless patches (Lezyne), a 3"x4" piece cut from an old water bottle, and some tyvek, 8" x 8" (FedEx bag); all can be handy if you tear a sidewall. All fit in a seat bag with a multitool, a few links of chain, and extra power links.

    I get places where it would take the better part of a day to walk out.
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  27. #27
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    No good

    Quote Originally Posted by Shrederland
    two tubes carried on every ride!
    and this only strengthens my point.

    at the end of the day- tubes are the old fail safe.

    1. you admit you aren't saving weight

    2. it has been stated that "method of riding" can cause or prevent pinch flats, so again the tube is innocent

    3. and my final remark is those of you who claim they are puncture proof carry a TUBE for back up on every ride, ready to bail you out.

    weight savings=none
    allows lower psi=riding style dependent
    thorn proof=but we all carry tubes
    simplicity=lose

    I'm sure this comes off cocky but I am stretched to see any real points for tubeless tire systems.

    Disclaimer: I bored, it's just crappy out enough I won't ride, and I like arguing.

    Ride whatever- I'm a scumbag.
    no chain no gain.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    and this only strengthens my point.

    at the end of the day- tubes are the old fail safe.

    1. you admit you aren't saving weight

    2. it has been stated that "method of riding" can cause or prevent pinch flats, so again the tube is innocent

    3. and my final remark is those of you who claim they are puncture proof carry a TUBE for back up on every ride, ready to bail you out.

    weight savings=none
    allows lower psi=riding style dependent
    thorn proof=but we all carry tubes
    simplicity=lose

    I'm sure this comes off cocky but I am stretched to see any real points for tubeless tire systems.

    Disclaimer: I bored, it's just crappy out enough I won't ride, and I like arguing.

    Ride whatever- I'm a scumbag.
    When I was riding tubed, I carried a spare tube too. I also carried a patch kit and I carry spare chain links. Just because something is solid and reliable doesn't mean you shouldn't have a backup. The only times I've flatted while riding tubeless was when I forgot to add more Stan's after a few months and it had dried.

    Obviously though, tubes still work great, for most people mountain biking. When I went from tubes to tubeless, I felt a difference in the feel of the bike - the way it handled, which could have been related to the lower pressures as much as anything else. In my personal experience, it was enough of a difference for me to stick with tubeless. I think I've been fortunate to some degree though, in that I don't suffer from tires that are always losing air, or Stan's flying out, or anything. The tubeless setup on both of my bikes (with different wheel sets and everything) have been just as trouble free as tubes are when it comes to inflation, air pressures, etc.
    :wq

  29. #29
    is buachail foighneach me
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    If I rode somewhere with alot of thorns, I would almost definitely be riding tubeless. It just seems to be more hassle than it's worth for my current environment.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    and this only strengthens my point.

    at the end of the day- tubes are the old fail safe.

    1. you admit you aren't saving weight

    2. it has been stated that "method of riding" can cause or prevent pinch flats, so again the tube is innocent

    3. and my final remark is those of you who claim they are puncture proof carry a TUBE for back up on every ride, ready to bail you out.

    weight savings=none
    allows lower psi=riding style dependent
    thorn proof=but we all carry tubes
    simplicity=lose

    I'm sure this comes off cocky but I am stretched to see any real points for tubeless tire systems.

    Disclaimer: I bored, it's just crappy out enough I won't ride, and I like arguing.

    Ride whatever- I'm a scumbag.
    I carry chain links but do not break chains.

    In the 70s, I spent weeks at a time in the backcountry, 50 miles from towns. I carried prescription medical supplies thanks to a doc friend who was a wilderness adventurer too. Never needed them, thank god, but being prepared can be a good thing.

    Keep your head in the sand. You probably believe this too?

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  31. #31
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    Stans tubeless

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    and this only strengthens my point.

    at the end of the day- tubes are the old fail safe.

    1. you admit you aren't saving weight

    2. it has been stated that "method of riding" can cause or prevent pinch flats, so again the tube is innocent

    3. and my final remark is those of you who claim they are puncture proof carry a TUBE for back up on every ride, ready to bail you out.

    weight savings=none
    allows lower psi=riding style dependent
    thorn proof=but we all carry tubes
    simplicity=lose

    I'm sure this comes off cocky but I am stretched to see any real points for tubeless tire systems.

    Disclaimer: I bored, it's just crappy out enough I won't ride, and I like arguing.

    Ride whatever- I'm a scumbag.
    I've spent, at most, one hour's work on the tubeless setup on my bike. That hour was setting it up. I haven't had to do anything other than top off the air periodically. In the two months leading up to the conversion alone, I probably spent nearly an hour just patching or replacing tubes. I even fixed the annoying leaky tire on the lawnmower with some stan's.

    The bulletproof reliability of the tubeless setup isn't why I ride it, though. The difference in feel between tubes and tubeless with my nanoraptor and nevegal was drastic. I never lose traction on uphills any more, I roll over roots like they've been shag carpeted. I like tubeless so much that when I wear through the gatorskins on my road bike, I plan to give tubeless high pressure road tires a try.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnypecans
    The difference in feel between tubes and tubeless with my nanoraptor and nevegal was drastic. I never lose traction on uphills any more, I roll over roots like they've been shag carpeted.....
    I gotta agree with this. Most tires roll, feel, and grip a bunch better with a tubeless setup. That's the reason for me.

    Bulletproof? No flats? FAR from it, IMO. I found it does allow me to run slightly less pressure, but you can still pinch flat tires and sealant wont fix it. Some tire casings pinch about as easy as tubes too, though most times you can get away with hitting the rim a little. Folks can talk all they want about riding smooth, but if you send a bike over nasty stuff at speed, anyone will get hooked up eventually (especially with a rigid bike). Those that say they don't aren't trying hard enough. Small puncture protection is nice though.

    Once you figure out how the process works, it's not much trouble to use. Refresh the sealant once in a while, whatever. The worst is when you tear a tire or pinch it and sealant shoots all over. Then you have to tube the tire with sealant everywhere.

    But still worth it for the feel and grip.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    . You probably believe this too?



    HAHAHAHAHAHA.

    I officially concede

    There is no rebuttal to that link!
    no chain no gain.

  35. #35
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    what my point was gonna be is if a tube fails, you install a new tube.
    if stans fails, you install a new tube.


    if stans was superior than it would be: stans fixing stans, and ultimately, when tubes fail, install stans. but that is not so. we all rely on tubes in a jam. thats really it.

    but slocaus pulled out the ultimate trump card with that link so I really have no wind left in my sail. I had to email the site to see if it still operated and if I could order a T shirt.

    i bow down.
    no chain no gain.

  36. #36
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    mostly I carry the tubes in case of sidewall rips. the stans has fixed most punctures and the last time I used a tube was when I tried a very ghetto tubeless setup(packing tape). Not trying to save weight, just hate sitting on the side of the trail fixing tubes every week or so.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    but slocaus pulled out the ultimate trump card with that link so I really have no wind left in my sail. I had to email the site to see if it still operated and if I could order a T shirt.

    i bow down.
    Naw man, don't give up! Tubes are the ultimate, the earth IS flat, there is gold in them thar hills, and yes Virginia, there is a Santa Claus!

    I almost fell of the chair, LOLed out loud, fer sure!
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Naw man, don't give up! Tubes are the ultimate, the earth IS flat, there is gold in them thar hills, and yes Virginia, there is a Santa Claus!

    I almost fell of the chair, LOLed out loud, fer sure!
    still bowing.............
    no chain no gain.

  39. #39
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    I keep telling myself I'll try tubeless next time I flat. That was over a year ago and I weigh 205 on a full rigid SS. I tacoed a wheel, the bike wouldn't roll and I had to carry it home, but there was still air in the tire.

    My bike is steel, I'm not worried about weight. I change tires alot cause I get bored. Tubeless isn't practical for me.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Diesel
    My bike is steel, I'm not worried about weight. I change tires alot cause I get bored. Tubeless isn't practical for me.
    Ditto, except the not practical part.......

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/LON_r3xmVpGh1QwdRGahzA?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.ggpht.com/_rrYqLPGLdY4/SRIkYa56fWI/AAAAAAAAAdI/30dNqhJ8y-Y/s800/PB040487.JPG" /></a>
    WWlt / Saguaro

    A week later.....

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/JuiF1L0k5QCa-l7Zc11rPw?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh5.ggpht.com/_rrYqLPGLdY4/STCMTHLAFxI/AAAAAAAAAxI/pX_LbEaSWsM/s800/PB280516.JPG" /></a>
    MtnKing / Ardent

    Takes all of 15 minutes.
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  41. #41
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    If you change tires with any degree of frequency, then tubeless is useless. I have 3-4 sets of tires that see ride time and using anything other than tubes would be way too much of a hassle.

    2 sets of standard trail tires that get changed fairly often
    1 set of studs
    1 set of slicks for spinning
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  42. #42
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    I think I disagree with many on the weightless/hassle free argument of tubes. I loaned tenspeed that wheel and while he blew off the bead, I have never done so in three years of riding tubeless. I have not had a single flat since running tubeless. I have burped air out of my tires in the process of going over my bars, which would normally mean a pinch, but I have have yet to actually get a flat. In those cases, the bead sealed again almost instantly leaving me with 10 pounds less pressure, not a flat. Not to mention, if I get a flat, I still have a tube with me. Mostly, I hate paying five dollars every time I get a flat. Even if it isn't that much more economical, I think the peace of mind I get from tubeless wheels outweighs all of the time I spent before changing flats.

  43. #43
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    Tubes give me peace of mind.

  44. #44
    Ride Good or Eat Wood
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    Haven't looked back since running tubeless. Worth the "hassle" of topping up every 6 months or so..... then again, better that in the comfort of my home than sitting on the side of a trail changing a flat.......
    "Though my life is changing fast,
    My roots are planted in the past,
    Who I am, is who I want to be
    "

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonzinmj
    I think I disagree with many on the weightless/hassle free argument of tubes. I loaned tenspeed that wheel and while he blew off the bead, I have never done so in three years of riding tubeless. I have not had a single flat since running tubeless. I have burped air out of my tires in the process of going over my bars, which would normally mean a pinch, but I have have yet to actually get a flat. In those cases, the bead sealed again almost instantly leaving me with 10 pounds less pressure, not a flat. Not to mention, if I get a flat, I still have a tube with me. Mostly, I hate paying five dollars every time I get a flat. Even if it isn't that much more economical, I think the peace of mind I get from tubeless wheels outweighs all of the time I spent before changing flats.

    How many times in your life have you flatted on the trail?? I bet you can count them on your hands. $5 x 10 flats equals the cost of tubeless on just one of your bikes. So if more than one bike has stans, which they do.... you lose. $$ savings $$ is not really a valid argument from you. I think you just like thinking that nothing can happen to your bike. "Peace of mind" but you are in fact paying more for that illusion.

    honestly matt, I was just pissed the one day I didn't have my pump, I had your front wheel and it burped on me, forcing me to limp down coyote ridge on <10psi. So that grudge is the basis for all my online venting and trash talking.
    no chain no gain.

  46. #46
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonzinmj
    ........I have burped air out of my tires in the process of going over my bars, which would normally mean a pinch, but I have have yet to actually get a flat........

    I don't think I have ever pinched a tube as a result of something that sent me OTB. Nearly every pinch flat I've ever had has been the result of hitting something really square edged or pointy at way too high of a speed, without crashing.

  47. #47
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    I rarely pinch flat tubes, even at fairly low pressures - a lot of it comes down to riding style. However, I still prefer tubeless and think it is well worth the hassles for two big reasons - lower rolling resistance at lower pressures and better traction with less tread (again to lower rolling resistance). If you care at all about going as fast as you can for a given level of energy output, you will use tubeless tires. However, the difference is not so large that I don't sometimes prefer the simplicity of tubes when I am not racing, especially as I seem to be able to get away with pretty low pressure in my tubes without pinch flatting much.

  48. #48
    trail rat
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    I got tired of having 10-15 flats each week, carrying 2-4 tubes

    and spending hours each week patching tubes because of goat head thorns.


    Now I do not get flats. Works for me. All the other tubeless benefits are gravy, yummy free gravy on my biscuits.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  49. #49
    Come on, dare me!
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Yes, always a spare tube, glueless patches (Lezyne), a 3"x4" piece cut from an old water bottle, and some tyvek, 8" x 8" (FedEx bag); all can be handy if you tear a sidewall. [/IMG]
    This can be handy too for a teared sidewall (sorry, got to be a bit patriotic ) and it fits in your Camelback (or your jersey pocket, for that matter). Used this trick once and it worked out great - saved me a 10-miles walk home.


  50. #50
    Come on, dare me!
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Diesel
    Tubes give me peace of mind.
    Tubeless gives me peace of mind.

  51. #51
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    Hey Jerome, long time no speak! (Jamie, Ex Dekerf if you don't remember?!)

    I went with tubes in the end, I do kind of miss the peace of mind of tubeless as you say, however, I guess it's easier to change a tube than a tubeless tyre if the worst really does happen.

    Hope you're well anyway!

  52. #52
    Come on, dare me!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just J
    Hey Jerome, long time no speak! (Jamie, Ex Dekerf if you don't remember?!)

    I went with tubes in the end, I do kind of miss the peace of mind of tubeless as you say, however, I guess it's easier to change a tube than a tubeless tyre if the worst really does happen.

    Hope you're well anyway!
    Hi and thanks. I still carry a spare tube, just in case, but with the right quantity of Stan's sealant, the tubeless-ready tires don't let me down in case of a flat. You have to be careful to add sealant regularly, though (each 3 months, +/-).

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